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Eating healthy is an important part of a healthy lifestyle and is something that should be taught to children at a young age. The following are some general guidelines for helping your child eat healthy. It is important to discuss your child’s diet with your child’s health care provider before making any dietary changes or placing your child on a diet.

  • Eat three meals a day, with healthy snacks.
  • Increase fiber in the diet and decrease the use of salt.
  • Drink water. Try to avoid drinks and juices that are high in sugar.
  • Children under the age of 2 need fats in their diet to help with the growth of their nervous system. Do not place these children on a low fat diet without talking with your child’s health care provider.
  • Eat balanced meals.
  • When cooking for your child, try to bake or broil instead of frying.
  • Decrease your child’s sugar intake.
  • Eat fruit or vegetables for a snack.
  • Decrease the use of butter and heavy gravies.
  • Eat more lean chicken, fish, and beans for protein

Making healthy food choices
MyPlate.gov
The Choose My Plate icon is a guideline to help you and your child eat a healthy diet. My Plate can help you and your child eat a variety of foods while encouraging the right amount of calories and fat.

The USDA and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services have prepared the plate to guide parents in selecting foods for children age 2 and older.

The My Plate icon is divided into five food group categories, emphasizing the nutritional intake of the following:

  • Grains. Foods that are made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley, or another cereal grain are grain products. Examples include whole wheat, brown rice, and oatmeal.
  • Vegetables. Vary your vegetables. Choose a variety of colorful vegetables, including dark green, red, and orange vegetables, legumes (peas and beans), and starchy vegetables.
  • Fruits. Any fruit or 100 percent fruit juice counts as part of the fruit group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut up, or pureed.
  • Dairy. Milk products and many foods made from milk are considered part of this food group. Focus on fat-free or low-fat products, as well as those that are high in calcium.
  • Protein. Go lean on protein. Choose low-fat or lean meats and poultry. Vary your protein routine—choose more fish, nuts, seeds, peas, and beans.

Oils are not a food group, yet some, such as nut oils, contain essential nutrients and can be included in the diet. Animal fats are solid fats and should be avoided.

Exercise and everyday physical activity should also be included with a healthy dietary plan. For more information, visit FortHealthCare.com/HealthyKids.

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One in eight women either currently has or will develop breast cancer in her lifetime.

If detected early, the five-year survival rate for breast cancer exceeds 96 percent. Mammograms are among the best early detection methods, yet 13 million U.S. women 40 years of age or older have never had a mammogram. The National Cancer Institute and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommend that women in their forties and older have mammograms every one to two years. A complete early detection plan also includes regular clinical breast examinations by a trained medical professional. In addition, monthly breast self-exams are strongly suggested.

At Fort HealthCare, we use the best available imaging technology referred to as “full-field digital mammography.” This offers greater power to detect subtle breast tissue changes ultimately enhancing the ability to detect breast cancer early.

Because early detection is so critical, we partner with the UW Health Radiology department for reading and interpretive services. That means that radiologists, specializing in breast health, will review your mammogram. You get the same care and service you would get at a larger facility while staying close to home. And, your results can follow you electronically at UW Health and Meriter facilities.

FREE MAMMOGRAMS FOR UN- OR UNDER-INSURED WOMEN
The Wisconsin Well Woman Program (WWWP) provides preventive health screening services to women with little or no health insurance coverage. Women aged 45 – 64 (with some funding for ages 35 – 44) who meet income requirements, can be enrolled in WWWP for breast and cervical screenings. For women in this category, age 40 – 49, Fort Memorial Hospital Foundation Vouchers are available to use for a free mammogram. For more information on WWWP or Fort Memorial Hospital Foundation Vouchers, please contact the Jefferson County Health Department at (920) 674-7193.

STATE-OF-THE-ART CARE
FHC Pink Ribbon FacilityFort Memorial Hospital is a Pink Ribbon facility, recognized as providing excellence in breast health paired with exceptional commitment and support to the women of our community.

When something is found during these routine screenings, it can be a confusing and scary time. To help ease stress, provide knowledgeable guidance, support, and education to women in all stages of breast care, we have created our new Healing Breast Care Center.

SAVE THE DATE for the Fort HealthCare Healing Breast Care Center Open House at Fort Memorial Hospital on Tuesday, October 29th from 3-6 p.m. Email promo@forthc.com if you would like an invitation sent to you!

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