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Let’s Do This: Becoming a Healthier You

Fort HealthCare’s Vision is "Be the healthiest community in Wisconsin." How do we make this a reality?



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Fort HealthCare’s Vision is "Be the healthiest community in Wisconsin." How do we make this a reality? As the leading health care provider in our region, Fort HealthCare has created a bold, daring, challenging and important health and wellness campaign – directed to the public as well as our partners – to positively affect change. To make this happen, the following need to be achieved:

• Educate area residents as to the benefits of becoming the healthiest community in Wisconsin

• Help each community be ready to embrace and act upon health-related messages

• Help area residents to see the benefits of healthy eating, health screenings and lifestyle improvements.

• Encourage individual responsibility and accountability

What does this mean for you? Your role is quite specific. We want you to exercise regularly and follow a diet that provides you and your family with healthy, nutritious foods. Also, we will remind you to have regular health screenings such as mammograms, colonoscopies and blood tests that assess your likelihood of becoming diabetic. And, we will encourage you to maintain or establish an ongoing relationship with a Fort HealthCare primary care physician.

Becoming Wisconsin’s Healthiest Community is a mission accomplished one person at a time. So start today and make the commitment to yourself – as well as those you love – by putting your words into actions. Are you in? Complete our online pledge towards a healthier you and join the cause. Let’s Do This!

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Grab and Go with Do-It-Yourself 100-Calorie Packs

Snacks can help curb your feeling of hunger between meals and help prevent you from arriving at your next meal ravenously hungry. The challenge is to make it healthy and satisfying.



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Snacks can help curb your feeling of hunger between meals and help prevent you from arriving at your next meal ravenously hungry. The challenge is to make it healthy and satisfying. At first when you see the 100-calorie packs of crackers and cookies you may think "How convenient!" But upon closer look, many of these snacks are loaded with empty calories and lack nutrients. You can make your snacks work for you by delivering nutrients like protein, carbohydrate, some fat, fiber, vitamins, minerals or antioxidants in a do-it-yourself pack.

What does a healthy snack look like?
Choose foods that will satisfy you and keep you feeling fuller longer by combining lean protein, some healthy fat, and nourishing carbohydrates. Ideally, you will include foods from at least two of these groups for each snack: a nourishing whole grain, a vegetable/fruit, milk or alternative, meat or other protein. In general, aim for snacks between 100 and 200 calories each.

Below are ideas for nutrient-loaded 100-calorie snack packs. Combine your bags to create a satisfying snack.

Fruits

  • Grapes, berries, or melons (1 C)
  • Banana, pear, apple, or orange (1 medium)
  • Apple (small) and peanut butter (1 tsp)
  • Dried figs (2), prunes or apricots (4-6), raisins or dried cranberry-raisins (2 T)

Vegetables

  • Mini carrots, cut up cucumber, cherry tomatoes, snap peas, peppers or other raw vegetables (1-2 C)
  • Vegetables (1 C) with dip (1 T)
  • Mixed green salad (5-6 C), with regular salad dressing (1 T)
  • Avocado (1/3) with lemon juice

Grains

  • Whole grain cracker stack (3) topped with hummus (1-1/2 T), or peanut butter (1-1/2 tsp), or cheese (25 g shredded)
  • Pretzels, low salt (18 g)
  • Whole grain cereal corn bran-type squares, or O-type cereal (1/2 C). Top with raisins (1 T)
  • Small homemade muffin such as banana or blueberry oat bran (1)

Protein

By preparing a series of grab and go snack packs, you’ll be prepared for your next snack attack with foods that help nourish your body and fuel your busy day.

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Top 10 Health Threats to Men - Act now to stay on top of your game

You may worry about having a heart attack or getting cancer, but you don’t bother to get a flu shot or wear a seatbelt. Well, you should. The Mayo Clinic has determined that the flu and accidents are among the top 10 health threats to men. Check out these other dangers, and take action to avoid them:



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You may worry about having a heart attack or getting cancer, but you don’t bother to get a flu shot or wear a seatbelt. Well, you should. The Mayo Clinic has determined that the flu and accidents are among the top 10 health threats to men. Check out these other dangers, and take action to avoid them:

  1. Heart Disease. There’s a reason worrying about a heart attack is a cliché: American men die from heart disease more than anything else, and more than 1 in 3 men have some form of cardiovascular disease. There are many forms, but coronary artery disease is most common. It causes the arteries to narrow and leads to heart attack. Prevention: Maintain a healthy weight, eat a low-fat diet, exercise often and find ways to de-stress. Follow your doctor’s orders if you have high cholesterol or hypertension, and control your blood sugar if you have diabetes.
  2. Cancer. More American men die of lung cancer than any other form of cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. Prostate cancer and colorectal cancer are the next two greatest concerns. Prevention: Don’t smoke, and avoid secondhand smoke, to reduce lung cancer risk. To minimize your risk of other forms of cancer, maintain a healthy weight, exercise regularly, wear sunscreen, only drink alcohol in moderation and see your doctor regularly for cancer screenings.
  3. Injuries. Think twice before speeding or weaving in traffic: Car crashes are the top cause of fatal accidents among American men, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Falls and poisonings are second and third on the list. Prevention: Always wear seatbelts, and obey posted speed limits. Never drive under the influence of alcohol or when you’re sleepy. Be cautious when standing on ladders. Use nonslip mats in the shower. Install carbon monoxide detectors at home.
  4. Stroke. When a blood vessel in the brain bursts or is blocked by a blood clot, the resulting lack of oxygen to areas of the brain can have devastating results, including paralysis on one side of the body, speech problems and memory loss. Prevention: You can’t change all of your stroke risk factors (like age and race), but quitting smoking, eating a low-fat diet, taking hypertension medication, losing weight and getting regular exercise can help lower your chances.
  5. Type 2 Diabetes. Eleven percent of American men ages 20 and older have type 2 diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Complications can cause hypertension, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness and amputations. Prevention: Lose weight if you’re too heavy. Exercise regularly and stick to a low-fat diet rich in fruits and vegetables.
  6. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). COPD encompasses a group of chronic diseases like emphysema, bronchitis and asthma. All negatively affect breathing. COPD is sometimes caused by respiratory infections, but it occurs most frequently because of tobacco use or inhaling air pollutants. Prevention: Quit smoking, and avoid air pollution or inhaling chemicals whenever possible.
  7. Flu. If you’re young and healthy, the flu may only sideline you for a few days, but it can be fatal if you have a weakened immune system or develop complications. According to the CDC, about 36,000 people die annually from flu complications. Prevention: Get a flu vaccine every year. Wash your hands often to minimize contact with germs.
  8. Suicide. White men commit suicide more often than any other group. Depression is a major risk factor for entertaining suicidal thoughts. Prevention: Seek treatment or counseling for depression; talk therapy and medication are often effective.
  9. Kidney Disease. Some people with diabetes or hypertension develop kidney failure over time. Once it becomes severe, patients need dialysis or kidney transplants. Prevention: Eat a healthy, low-salt diet, exercise regularly and take blood pressure medications as needed.
  10. Alzheimer’s Disease. It’s the most common form of dementia in older people, and it usually strikes after age 60. At first, patients may have trouble remembering events or blank on someone’s name, but when Alzheimer’s becomes severe, patients are unable to care for themselves. Prevention: There’s no cure for Alzheimer’s and no way to prevent it, but experts believe that eating a low-fat diet rich in fish containing omega-3 fatty acids and staying mentally and socially active may help reduce risk.
  11. Visit FortHealthCare.com/LetsDoThis/Men to find more resources that will help you become the healthiest man you can be no matter your age!

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Container Gardening: Get a Jump-Start on your Summer Garden!

Mother Nature is dragging her feet to get spring started this year, and many of you are having spring fever! Consider container gardening – a spring-like activity that can start indoors and give you a jump-start on your summer vegetable cache until spring-like temperatures catch up with the calendar! All that is needed is adequate sunlight, water and fertilizer plus a well-draining growing medium.



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Mother Nature is dragging her feet to get spring started this year, and many of you are having spring fever! Consider container gardening – a spring-like activity that can start indoors and give you a jump-start on your summer vegetable cache until spring-like temperatures catch up with the calendar! All that is needed is adequate sunlight, water and fertilizer plus a well-draining growing medium.

Start with containers made of plastic, clay, ceramic or wood (avoid treated lumber and select those made of cedar or redwood). If drainage holes are not provided, you can drill them yourself into the bottom of the containers. Most vegetables require containers that hold at least 6-8 inches of potting mix. Root crops such as carrots and large plants such as tomatoes require deeper containers.

Fill containers with soilless potting mixes which drain well, yet do not dry out too fast. Soilless potting mixes have several advantages over soil because they are free of plant disease organisms and weed seeds, are less likely to compact, hold moisture and nutrients well and are lightweight – making the container more portable. Plant vegetables that grow well in a backyard garden such as; beets, carrots, cucumbers, green beans, lettuce, radishes, spinach, summer squash, swiss chard and tomatoes.

When it comes to caring for your container gardens, follow the below tips:

  • Location – Nearly all vegetables grow and produce best when grown in full sunlight. Plants that bear fruit such as cucumbers and tomatoes and root crops (beets and carrots) require at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day. Leafy vegetables (lettuce and spinach) can tolerate more shade than most other vegetables.
  • Watering – Container plants require frequent watering because they dry out more quickly from the sun and wind (some may even require daily watering). Apply enough water to reach the bottom and drain through the holes. Never allow the soil to dry out completely because this could cause the plants to drop their fruits and flowers. When watering, avoid wetting the leaves. Wet leaves can encourage the development of plant diseases.
  • Fertilization – Container grown plants require more frequent fertilization because they have less soil from which to obtain nutrients. Apply a soluble fertilizer once every 1-2 weeks while watering. Many commercial potting mixes contain a slow release fertilizer- if you use one of these mixes it may not be necessary to begin fertilization until mid-summer.
  • For those without a green thumb, locally grown produce is still available throughout Jefferson County all season long! Fort Memorial Hospital hosts Peace of Eden Farm every Wednesday from 2 – 5:30 p.m. The market will be held in the Fort Memorial Hospital Mezzanine throughout the month of April. In May, the market will be held outdoors on the front hospital lawn (off of Sherman Avenue). Surrounding cities such as Cambridge, Fort Atkinson, Jefferson, Lake Mills and Whitewater also host farmer’s markets on a weekly basis.

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5 Ways To Keep Your Kids Germ-Free

Avoiding all the bacteria, viruses and organisms that cause colds, stomach flu and other illnesses is impossible. Children, with their developing immune systems, are extra susceptible to passing bugs; The average preschooler suffers as many as 10 infections a year. Still, you can take steps to bolster your child’s resistance. Adopt these five healthy habits to keep your child out of the school nurse’s office:



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Avoiding all the bacteria, viruses and organisms that cause colds, stomach flu and other illnesses is impossible. Children, with their developing immune systems, are extra susceptible to passing bugs; The average preschooler suffers as many as 10 infections a year. Still, you can take steps to bolster your child’s resistance. Adopt these five healthy habits to keep your child out of the school nurse’s office:

1. Eat smart - Good nutrition that comes from a varied and well-balanced diet is one of the most important influences on your child’s health. If you breastfed, you already gave your child a terrific start, but it probably didn’t take long for that same child to begin making his or her own food choices. Most kids today consume far too much fat and sugar and not nearly enough calcium, fiber, fruits and vegetables.

To ensure your child eats healthy, the whole family needs to practice the following measures:

  • Schedule regular family meals and limit fast food.
  • Aim for at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day.
  • Serve lean meats and other sources of protein such as poultry, fish, eggs and nuts. Grill, broil, roast or steam instead of deep frying.
  • Limit junk food such as chips, candy, cookies, sodas and fruit-flavored drinks.
  • Stock your home with healthy choices like fresh produce, yogurt, cheese, popcorn, pretzels, whole-grain bread and cereal, water and low-fat milk.

2. Play hard – Getting enough regular physical activity is essential. It strengthens the heart, lungs, muscles and bones, enhances sleep, reduces stress and anxiety, improves mood and helps maintain a healthy weight. Some research suggests these benefits translate into improved resilience against illness-causing germs; others believe exercise directly affects the immune system. The bottom line: Everyone needs physical activity to stay healthy. Experts say kids should get at least 60 minutes of moderate activity every day.

To get your child moving:

  • Limit TV watching, computer time and video-game playing to no more than two hours a day.
  • Provide opportunities for physical play—give toys like jump ropes and skates as presents and sign your child up for karate, gymnastics or team sports.
  • Ride bikes, hike or walk together as a family.

3. Sleep well – There’s more to getting enough sleep than staying awake during math class. Lack of proper sleep affects memory, physical performance and mood as well as the ability to fight off bacteria and viruses. Some experts believe sleep lets the body’s neurons shut down and repair themselves. Sleep needs may vary, but most kids require 10 to 13 hours a day.

To help your child get enough rest:

  • Set a regular bedtime.
  • Establish a nightly routine and include winding-down rituals like taking a bath and reading stories.
  • Play soft, soothing music.

4. Don’t be late to vaccinate – The American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention jointly advise immunizations to prevent rotavirus, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, pneumonia, meningitis, blood infections, influenza and Haemophilus influenzae. However, as many as 37 percent of children under age 3 are not up to date with their vaccinations, placing themselves and others at risk, according to the American Medical Association.

Even if your child got all the "baby shots," he or she still needs a round of boosters at about age 5 and again at age 11 or 12. In addition, talk to your pediatrician about yearly flu vaccines and other immunizations that may benefit your child.

5. Create a smoke-free environment – If you or someone in your home smokes, your child is at risk for bronchitis, pneumonia, frequent colds, asthma, chronic coughs, ear infections, high blood pressure and learning and behavior problems. Using air filters or smoking in another room isn’t enough to protect your child. Quitting smoking not only improves the health of everyone around you but also sets a good example.

How healthy is your family? Healthy habits learned early help to make long and healthy lifetimes – it’s never too early (or too late) to start! Visit FortHealthCare.com/LetsDoThis/Families for more resources!

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Protect Yourself from Sexual Assault

Sexual assault, including but not limited to rape, is any kind of sexual physical contact that involves force or any form of coercion or intimidation.



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Sexual assault, including but not limited to rape, is any kind of sexual physical contact that involves force or any form of coercion or intimidation.

Rape can happen to anyone—children, grandmothers, students, working women, wives, mothers, and even males. Many victims know their assailants. In more than half of reported cases, the rapist is an acquaintance, neighbor, friend, or relative of the victim, according to the National Women’s Health Information Center (NWHIC). Most rapes occur in the victim’s home.Women who use illegal drugs and alcohol are more vulnerable to sexual assault because they’re less aware of their surroundings.

The following suggestions from the NWHIC can help decrease your chance of being sexually assaulted.

Safety at home:

  • Install a peephole viewer in your door, and never open your door without knowing who’s on the other side.
  • Install effective locks on all doors and windows and use them.
  • Install an intruder alarm system.
  • Don’t let any strangers into your home, no matter what the reason or how dire the situation appears to be. Offer to make an emergency phone call while they wait outside.
  • If you come home and find a door or window open or signs of forced entry, don’t go in. Call 911 or your local emergency number from a safe location.

On the street:

  • Be alert to your surroundings and the people around you, especially if you’re alone or it’s dark.
  • Walk confidently, directly, and at a steady pace on the side of the street facing traffic. A rapist looks for someone who appears vulnerable.
  • Always park in a well-lit area.
  • Use the alarm button on your automatic car door opener if you think you are being followed to your car.
  • Have your keys out and ready before you need them, whether it is for your car or home.
  • Always look around, and in the back seat of your car, before you enter your vehicle.
  • If you think you’re being followed, walk quickly to an area where there are lights and people. If a car appears to be following you, turn and walk on the other side of the street.
  • If you’re in danger, scream and run, or yell “fire."

At parties and bars:

  • Avoid intoxication and drug use. When a person is drinking alcohol or using drugs, it’s harder to think clearly and evaluate a potentially dangerous situation.
  • In a bar, accept drinks only from the bartender or wait staff.

If have been raped:

  • Go to a safe place immediately and call the police. The sooner you report the incident, the greater the chance the attacker will be caught.
  • Don’t wash, douche, change clothes, or clean up in any way until you talk with the police and go to a hospital.
  • Remember, you’re the victim. You have nothing to feel guilty or ashamed about. Contact a rape crisis center to help you deal with the assault. The Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network has crisis workers available 24/7 at 800-656-HOPE or through its website.

The Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) program at Fort HealthCare provides confidential medical care, reporting and support to sexual assault victims. The SANE program is staffed by registered nurses who have received advanced education and instruction in medical-forensic examination of sexual assault victims. They are also equipped to respond to the psychological and emotional trauma that may be present after an assault. Victims are encouraged to come to the emergency room as soon as possible after the incident of a sexual assault.

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Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Fueling Your Fitness

Supplementing your exercise routine with proper nutrition and hydration plays an integral role in maintaining and enhancing your total fitness and boosting your body’s ability to perform at its maximum capability.



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Supplementing your exercise routine with proper nutrition and hydration plays an integral role in maintaining and enhancing your total fitness and boosting your body’s ability to perform at its maximum capability.

Aztalan Engineering, RateWatch and The Fireside accept Commitment to Corporate Wellness Awards

Being well is made easier when you are surrounded by those who share your goals and can help motivate you to make good choices. With this in mind, Fort HealthCare is encouraging businesses and other organizations in the area to promote wellness in the workplace.



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Center of Excellence Award for Fort HealthCare Wound & Edema Center

For the third consecutive year, the Fort HealthCare Wound & Edema Center has been recognized as a Center of Distinction by Healogics, a national leader in wound care. For the first-time ever, the clinic was also granted the Robert Warriner III, MD Center of Excellence Award, making it one of only two in Wisconsin to receive this honor.



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Construction Proceeds on Fort HealthCare Integrated Family Care Location

Construction is moving ahead quickly at the future location of the Fort HealthCare Integrated Family Care clinic. Currently located at 426 McMillen Street, the primary care clinic is moving to a permanent site at 1520 Madison Avenue in May. The new location is adjacent to Fort HealthCare Orthopaedic Associates and Fort HealthCare Therapy & Sport, in the former Goodwill store. The clinic will continue to be staffed by Family Medicine physicians Edwin Fischer, MD, Sara Barnes, DO, Aaron Beck, MD and pediatric nurse practitioner Laurel Runte.



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Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.

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Tabouleh Salad

Tabouleh salad is a Middle Eastern dish made with bulgur, fresh veggies, olive oil and spices.



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Tabouleh salad is a Middle Eastern dish made with bulgur, fresh veggies, olive oil and spices.

Prep time: 10 minutes
Ready in: 1 hour, 10 minutes
Servings: 4

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup bulgur
  • 1/2 cup boiling water
  • 1 cup chopped parsley
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint leaves
  • 5 tomatoes, diced
  • 1 onion, finely diced
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • salt to taste

Preparation

  1. Place the bulgur in a small mixing bowl. Add the boiling water, mix and cover with a towel; Let stand for 1 hour. Drain any excess water.
  2. Combine the parsley, mint, tomatoes, onion, olive oil, lemon juice and salt. Add the bulgur; mix well and serve.
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