Print Header

Shapedown Program Helps Families Improve Health & Well-Being


Fort HealthCare clinicians are undergoing extensive training to offer Shapedown, a family-based wellness program that targets weight, nutrition and activity in both children (ages 10-16) and parents.



Read more...

Fort HealthCare clinicians are undergoing extensive training to offer Shapedown, a family-based wellness program that targets weight, nutrition and activity in both children (ages 10-16) and parents.

Read More

Hide

Teaching Kids to Wash Their Hands

It’s hard enough to get grownups to wash up. Only two-thirds of adults wash their hands after they use the restroom, studies show. How do we get our kids into the hand-washing habit, then?



Read more...

It’s hard enough to get grownups to wash up. Only two-thirds of adults wash their hands after they use the restroom, studies show. How do we get our kids into the hand-washing habit, then? The obvious first step is to practice what you preach: Wash your hands before eating or cooking a meal, after using the bathroom, and after working or playing with your hands.

More than half of food-related illness outbreaks are caused by unwashed or poorly-washed hands, says the American Society for Microbiology. For example, outbreaks of hepatitis A in children in day-care centers have been directly connected to lack of hand-washing after changing diapers or using the bathroom.

Other illnesses

Other pathogens such as E. coli, Shigella, and Norwalk virus have also been spread by lack of hand washing. Spread of other conditions such as respiratory infections, impetigo, and conjunctivitis (pinkeye) also can be prevented by washing hands with soap and water.

Tell your children to wash their hands before a meal, after using the bathroom, after playing, and after touching or petting pets or other animals. Show them how to do it, over and over. Don’t get frustrated: It takes a while for the habit to become second nature, says the Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

Children know when and why and how to wash their hands, but they forget to, the APIC says. They will wash their hands if the dirt is the obvious kind like mud or finger paints. Less obvious dirt and germs tend to be ignored.

Tips for washing
Try these techniques:

  • For visibly dirty hands, wash in warm or hot running water, which is more effective at dissolving oils.
  • Keep water running throughout the washing to ensure greatest removal of bacteria.
  • Wet your hands and then lather with soap.
  • Wash all hand surfaces: palms, back of hands, fingers, and fingernails.
  • Rub lathered hands together for at least 20 seconds, and up to 30 seconds (about as long as it takes you to recite the ABCs).

If a child is too small to reach the sink and can be safely cradled in one arm, hold the child to help him or her wash hands. A child who can stand should either use a child-sized sink or stand on a safety step at a height that allows the child’s hands to reach the running water. An alternative method for a child who can’t reach the running water and is too heavy to hold is to wipe the child’s hands with a damp and soapy paper towel. Use another clean, wet paper towel to rinse soap off the hands. Dry the hands with a third clean paper towel. Wash your own hands after helping the child.

For more information on keeping your family healthy this season, visit FortHealthCare.com/FamilyWellness.

Hide

Myths and Tips About Dressing for Winter

Do you know enough about the cold to keep warm? Poor planning of a winter outing can lead to frostbite and hypothermia. The following are some misconceptions about the cold and suggestions for staying toasty this winter. 



Read more...

Do you know enough about the cold to keep warm? Poor planning of a winter outing can lead to frostbite and hypothermia. The following are some misconceptions about the cold and suggestions for staying toasty this winter. 

Myth: Dressing warmly avoids colds, viruses, and flu.

Mom was wrong on this one-mostly. If you haven’t been exposed to a virus, cold weather won’t make any difference. There are over 200 viruses that can cause the common cold.

  Myth: You lose body heat through your head.

There’s nothing special about your head. You’ll lose body heat from any part of your body that is exposed. It’s a good idea to wear a hat, but other parts of your body must also be covered to keep you from getting cold, experts say. 

The amount of heat you can lose through your head depends upon a number of factors, including how thick your hair is and how much energy you expend in the cold.  The ratio of the surface area of a child’s head relative to the child’s body surface area is much greater than that of an adult, so that children lose proportionally more heat through their heads. Hoods and hats are more important to children because of this.

Myth: Men and women feel cold at same temperature.

Ever notice that women’s hands and feet tend to get colder before men’s? It’s because the external temperature at which men’s and women’s bodies begin conserving heat—called the set point temperature—varies by about three degrees.

When surrounding temperatures drop to a certain point, your body will conserve heat by shutting off the blood flow to the hands and feet, making them feel chilled. For women, that temperature is about 70 degrees, while men can hold steady until about 67 or 68 degrees. 

Myth: Dress in layers to stay warm.

It’s true that dressing in layers allows people to adjust for different levels of activity. But one well-made, warm garment will do just as well to keep away the winter chills. 

Dressing in layers does have merit, particularly for someone exercising in the cold. For the best results, wear polypropylene or another synthetic fabric next to the skin, a knit middle layer (which can be taken off if you get too warm) and a synthetic outer layer. 

Myth: Cotton is a good insulator.

Don’t drag those old cotton long johns out of the closet yet. They may be comfortable for lazing before a fire, but they can be downright dangerous outside in the cold. 

When cotton gets wet, it conducts heat away from the body at a much more rapid rate than other fabrics. Anything that can dampen your clothes, such as perspiration, rain, or falling in the water, can cause cotton to start robbing you of heat fast. 

A good substitute is polypropylene, Capilene, or some other synthetic substance that pulls water away from your skin.

  Myth: Drinking alcohol will keep you warm.

Drinking alcohol may make you feel warm because it causes blood to rush to your skin’s surface. But it actually causes your blood vessels to dilate and makes you lose heat faster. Drinking alcohol in the cold also impairs the shivering process, which generates extra body heat. But the worst part about alcohol consumption is that it impairs judgment.  

Hide

Start Some Healthful Holiday Traditions

The month of December can produce extra stress, a breakdown in healthy eating habits, even depression. But you and your family can adopt some new traditions that may help relieve the season’s stress and make your holidays healthy and happy.



Read more...

The month of December can produce extra stress, a breakdown in healthy eating habits, even depression. But you and your family can adopt some new traditions that may help relieve the season’s stress and make your holidays healthy and happy.

Your physical health

When the holidays become more than you bargained for, your physical health can be compromised because you may put aside healthy habits. And stress can put additional demands on your body. Here are some tips on maintaining your health during the holiday season:

  • Don’t do too much. Give yourself some time to relax.
  • Share the workload. Let everyone play an active role; make the holidays a family affair so you’re not burdened with all the work.
  • Establish priorities. You can’t do everything; say no to some demands on your time.
  • Simplify your life. Be less elaborate this year. Relax your housekeeping and holiday preparations.
  • Continue to exercise. Don’t let your regular regimen lapse.
  • Eat healthy foods and limit your consumption of high-fat holiday treats. Serve healthy fare at your family’s holiday party.

Your emotional health

It’s easy to become overwrought this time of year, especially if you believe something is lacking in your holiday celebration. Here are some ways to create new holiday traditions that will help level your emotions:

  • Ask yourself if you really enjoy all the rituals or whether they have merely become habits. Try adopting less elaborate traditions of holidays past.
  • Don’t be afraid to scale down gift giving. You’ll probably receive a lot of support.
  • If your annual party is too much to handle, postpone it until after the holidays when you have more time to prepare. This also will help alleviate post-holiday letdown by giving you something fun to anticipate.
  • If you are unable to be with your family, get out around people. Plan to be with friends or volunteer to help others who also may be separated from their families.

Happy and healthy kids

Children are especially vulnerable to commercial stimuli during the holiday season. But basically, all kids really need are realistic expectations about gifts, an even-paced holiday season and strong, loving family traditions. Here are some ways to make the holidays special for your children:

  • Spend more time with your kids. Entertain less and attend fewer parties that exclude children.
  • Watch less television and do more activities as a family.
  • Include your kids in all preparations. Let your children help you decorate and bake, even if it means your creations aren’t perfect.
  • Teach children the meaning of giving. Adopt a needy family and have your youngsters help you prepare a meal for them. Suggest that your children buy a gift for an underprivileged child with their own money. Or ask them to donate one of their own gifts to a less fortunate child.
  • Teach your children that gifts don’t have to be tangible. Trade intangible gifts with each other, such as helping with homework, washing the dishes and polishing shoes. Let your children come up with their own ideas of what they can offer.

Fort HealthCare wishes you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season!

Hide

Simple Ways to Indulge Without Guilt

Ah, the holidays. Visions of sugarplums, cookie exchanges, and company parties dance in our heads. Trouble is, we often find ourselves with several post-holiday pounds dancing around our hips. Research has shown that the average person gains nearly seven pounds between Halloween and New Year’s Day.



Read more...

Ah, the holidays. Visions of sugarplums, cookie exchanges, and company parties dance in our heads. Trouble is, we often find ourselves with several post-holiday pounds dancing around our hips. Research has shown that the average person gains nearly seven pounds between Halloween and New Year’s Day.

The good news? You don’t have to entirely give up your holiday favorites, including delicious desserts, in order to lighten up the season. There are a few simple ways to indulge without guilt.

Modify your recipes

  • Simple changes to your dessert recipes, for instance, can significantly reduce fat and calories-while keeping all the flavor.
  • Use egg substitutes, available at your grocery store, or egg whites only (two whites per whole egg in recipe), to reduce fat and cholesterol.
  • Try a fruit puree such as applesauce, apple butter, or prune puree instead of oil when baking. These fruit purees contain cellulose, a natural vegetable fiber that traps moisture in your breads, cakes, and muffins. You can substitute half-or more-of the fat, this way.
  • Cut back on sugar in pies. Nutritionists say that most pie recipes contain much more sugar than needed. Try cutting back by half, and see if you’re pleased with the results. Or use a commercial sugar-substitute.
  • If you’re worried that holiday guests may detect your changes, test your recipes beforehand, so you can make sure that they taste just as delicious as the original versions. Change only one ingredient at a time, so you know which changes you like best. And to avoid sampling while creating your goodies, it’s best to do your baking after a meal, when you’re not hungry.
  • The holidays, while a time to celebrate traditions, also are an excellent opportunity to create healthy new habits. Introduce more fruit-based desserts, such as warm fruits topped with fat-free whipped topping or drizzled with fat-free chocolate sauce. Use only a bottom crust on pies, rather than a top as well. Make cakes without the frosting, or reduce the amount of frosting. 

Plan for parties

  • The preponderance of holiday parties means we don’t always have control over the types of foods available. The trick here is to cut back on your portions.
  • If you’re at a dessert buffet, and you see several desserts that are your favorites, take only a sliver of each, so you’re not eating three whole desserts. If you’re having pie, don’t eat all the crust. Avoid any desserts that even look rich, such as cheesecakes.
  • Stick near the fresh fruit platter-and stay away from alcohol, which is full of empty, non-nutritious calories. Fill up, instead, on healthier foods such as turkey, lean cuts of beef, and vegetables.
  • Eat before going to the party. If you’re somewhat full, you won’t be "picking" on the buffet.
  • Finally, find a way to add healthy foods at the party. Ask the host or hostess if you may contribute a dessert. Then, bring one of your low-fat, light, and healthy desserts.

Keep your balance!

Health experts say you shouldn’t get overly concerned if you don’t lose weight over the holidays; you’ll be ahead of the game if you simply don’t gain. Therefore, don’t set unrealistic weight-loss goals.

Focus, instead, on the joys of the season: spending time with friends and family, and showing them you appreciate them. Plan some healthy family activities, such as a game of touch football, ice-skating, or an evening walk to work off dessert. At parties, mingle and converse, rather than sticking by the food table. Wait for about 20 minutes after a meal before deciding to eat dessert; your blood sugar will have increased after the meal, decreasing your craving for sweets.

Keep in mind that your friends and family may be just as conscious about their eating habits and weight control, this time of year. By offering healthy alternatives, you can feel good about what you’re serving.

General recipe modification tips:

  • Use nonstick cooking spray to grease the pan when cooking and baking.
  • Use heart-healthy fats, rather than butter or shortening, for baking.
  • Use 3 tablespoons of unsweetened cocoa powder to replace 1 ounce of unsweetened chocolate.
  • Use an equal amount of marshmallow creme in frostings to substitute for butter or margarine.
  • Try finely crushed cinnamon graham crackers instead of traditional piecrusts.
  • Use two egg whites instead of one whole egg when baking.
  • Use equal amounts of applesauce or baby food prunes to replace oil.
  • Use equal amounts of fat-free plain yogurt to replace sour cream.

If you want to eat healthy this holiday season, is it necessary to cut out all those tempting treats and snacks? Take this quiz to find out.

Hide

Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

4 Steps You Need to Take Right Away To Control Your Blood Sugar

Are you a person with diabetes? Whether you were recently diagnosed or have been living with diabetes for years, this is a helpful reminder on the four things you must do to maintain a healthy blood sugar. Even if you are NOT DIABETIC, these tips can help keep you on track to avoid future blood sugar or insulin-related problems.



Read more...

Are you a person with diabetes? Whether you were recently diagnosed or have been living with diabetes for years, this is a helpful reminder on the four things you must do to maintain a healthy blood sugar. Even if you are NOT DIABETIC, these tips can help keep you on track to avoid future blood sugar or insulin-related problems.

UW Health Sleep Medicine Services Now at Fort Memorial Hospital

The Specialty Clinic at Fort HealthCare ‘s Fort Memorial Hospital is pleased to announce that UW Health Doctors Mary Klink and Mihai Teodorescu are now providing sleep medicine consultations. Dr. Klink and Dr. Teodorescu will see patients on Mondays and Tuesdays during the month.



Read more...

Fort HealthCare Receives Grant from Wisconsin Department of Public Health

Fort HealthCare has been awarded a $10,000 grant from the Wisconsin Department of Public Health Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity to work with the seven communities in its service area on implementing the Community Health Assessment And Group Evaluation (CHANGE). CHANGE is a data-collection, coalition building and planning resource for coalitions and other community partnerships, seeking to make their community a healthier place to live, work, learn and play.



Read more...

Bike for Mike Raises Nearly $6,500 in honor of Fort HealthCare CEO and support of Tomorrow's Hope

On October 20, Fort HealthCare, in partnership with Tomorrow ‘s Hope and 2 Rivers Bicycle & Outdoor, hosted the family-friendly bike ride and fun run/walk, "Bike with Mike" for over 120 participants. Cyclists chose from 50, 30, or 15 mile marked routes and walkers and runners of all ages followed the path for a distance of their choosing.



Read more...

Farm to School Program Has Kids Eating Locally Grown Foods

Schools across the nation celebrate National Farm to School Month and local school districts are no exception. Farm to School programming instills healthy eating habits early in life when most children are adaptable to change. Research shows that when students know the vegetables being served in school cafeterias were locally-grown, and when shown a picture of the farmer who grew them, students’ attitudes and behaviors regarding healthy eating and nutrition can change.



Read more...

Rock the Walk 2012 challenged local residents and workers to

Fort HealthCare recently challenged local residents and workers to increase their current activity level and improve their health by participating in the Rock the Walk 2012 Challenge. The 6-week challenge was open to employees of Fort HealthCare, Aztalan Engineering, Ball Corporation, Cygnus Business Media, Digi-Star, Fort Atkinson School District, Jefferson County Local Government, Jones Dairy Farm, Nasco, RateWatch, Spacesaver and Whitewater Unified School District.



Read more...

Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.

December 5  -  
December 5  -  
December 6  -  
December 8  -  
December 10  -  
December 20  -  
January 3  -  

Two-Toned Mashed Potatoes

From EatingWell: November/December 2012

12 servings, 1/2 cup each | Active Time: 20 minutes | Total Time: 35 minutes



Read more...

From EatingWell: November/December 2012

12 servings, 1/2 cup each | Active Time: 20 minutes | Total Time: 35 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon buttermilk plus 2/3 cup, divided
  • 2 tablespoons crème fraîche or sour cream
  • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder or granulated onion
  • Pinch of salt plus 3/4 teaspoon, divided
  • 1 1/2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 1 1/2 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 1 small leek, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced, white and light green parts only
  • 2 tablespoons butter, cut into 4 pieces
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh chives

Preparation

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil.
  2. Combine 1 tablespoon buttermilk, crème fraîche (or sour cream), onion powder (or granulated onion) and pinch of salt. Cover and refrigerate while you cook the vegetables.
  3. Add potatoes, sweet potatoes and leek to the boiling water and return to a boil. Reduce heat to maintain a vigorous simmer and cook until tender enough to pierce with a knife, 12 to 15 minutes. Drain and return the vegetables to the pan (off the heat).
  4. Add the remaining 2/3 cup buttermilk, the remaining 3/4 teaspoon salt, butter and pepper to the pan; coarsely mash with a potato masher. Serve topped with the sauce and chives.

Nutrition
Per serving : 117 Calories; 3 g Fat; 1 g Sat; 1 g Mono; 6 mg Cholesterol; 21 g Carbohydrates; 2 g Protein; 2 g Fiber; 190 mg Sodium; 318 mg Potassium

Hide