Health365 eNews
September 2014 • Volume 5, Issue 9

10 Ways to Keep Your Kids Moving

Fit kids are healthy kids, but many are simply not getting the exercise they need. Children should get at least 60 minutes of moderate exercise every day. The sedentary nature of modern playtime, however, with TV, video games and the computer, offers little physical activity, and dwindling gym classes are not providing enough exercise. One study of third-graders found their physical education classes yielded just 25 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity a week


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Fit kids are healthy kids, but many are simply not getting the exercise they need. Children should get at least 60 minutes of moderate exercise every day. The sedentary nature of modern playtime, however, with TV, video games and the computer, offers little physical activity, and dwindling gym classes are not providing enough exercise. One study of third-graders found their physical education classes yielded just 25 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity a week

Because physical activity typically declines during the teen years, childhood is a pivotal time for ingraining the fitness habit. So turn off the TV, leave the car keys home and get moving. 

  1. Find your child’s sport. When it comes to organized sports and activities, kids have a huge number of choices, but finding the one that’s right for your child is essential. Not all kids enjoy team sports or competitions; other options can help them stay fit. Your child may want to try cycling, martial arts, dance lessons, cheerleading, tennis, figure skating, horseback riding or hiking. Stick with just one organized sport each season and let your child try new activities from year to year.

  2. Target a passion. Find things that your child likes to do and incorporate exercise with it. If your child is artistic, for instance, take a nature hike to collect flowers, leaves and rocks for a collage. An avid reader will enjoy a stroll to the library, and a climber will love a trip to a neighborhood jungle gym or climbing wall.

  3. Join the backyard fun. Nothing makes a lawn game more vigorous than Mom or Dad joining in. Play basketball or touch football or teach your child games from your playground days. On hot days, turn on the lawn sprinklers and play tag through them; soak large sponges or Nerf balls in water for a wet dodge-ball game; or start a war with garden hoses and water balloons.

  4. Rely on foot power. See how many errands you and your child can accomplish on foot, scooter, in-line skates or bike. Return library books, drop off dry cleaning or buy stamps. Kids usually hate tagging along for errands, but they’ll get a kick out of going through the bank’s drive-thru on skates.

  5. Plan family outings that involve physical activity. Take a trip to the zoo; enter a 5K fun walk-run; or go hiking, biking, snorkeling, skiing or camping.

  6. Stock your car. Keep a small duffel of toys—a playground ball, jump rope, Frisbee or football—in the car and step outside for spontaneous pick-up games anytime you’re stuck waiting around the auto repair center or Laundromat. Find a brick wall and a tennis ball and play handball while you wait for another child’s scout meeting or class to let out.

  7. Set up a home obstacle course. Let your child design an intricate obstacle course in the backyard and time each family member as he or she races to complete it. Make the course weave in and out of trees and set a high mark to jump and touch. Incorporate the swing set, slide, monkey bars, basketball hoop and anything in the garage such as ride-on toys or boxes to hop over or crawl through.

  8. Hop like a bunny. Ask your toddler or preschooler to think of his or her favorite animals and then hop like a bunny, soar like an eagle or walk like a crab.

  9. Play Ultimate Hopscotch. Use sidewalk chalk to create an elaborate hopscotch trail. Cover the entire driveway or let it snake around the house or block.

  10. Make physical chores fun. Who can pull the most weeds from the garden, pick up the most trash or rake the biggest pile of leaves? Charge your child with washing the car and walking the dog.

Fort HealthCare introduces the Movin’ and Losin’ program, a 6-week weight-management program designed specifically for families (with children ages 8 – 15 years old) who are looking for ways to incorporate healthier eating and fitness habits into their everyday lifestyle. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, Heidi Jennrich and Occupational Therapist, Alyssa Maurer, will cover a different topic each week related to diet and exercise and each class will include a family fitness activity utilizing Fort HealthCare’s new Railyard fitness equipment. This program begins September 17 – register your family today!

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Healthy Changes for Staying Young

 Time takes its toll on a body, but you don’t have to sit back and let the effects of aging take place without a fight. There are things you can do to control the aging process and even reverse some of the damage that’s already been done. DNA damage causes a great deal of aging. Smoking, too much sun, and other factors can cause DNA damage.


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Time takes its toll on a body, but you don’t have to sit back and let the effects of aging take place without a fight. There are things you can do to control the aging process and even reverse some of the damage that’s already been done. DNA damage causes a great deal of aging. Smoking, too much sun, and other factors can cause DNA damage. 

Part of the aging process is caused by oxidation, the breakdown of cells and tissues as they mingle with oxygen. This can occur because of excessive alcohol use.

You can fight that process by adopting healthy lifestyle habits that:

  • Help your immune system fight disease

  • Build up reserves of lean muscle mass

  • Prevent or slow degenerative changes

  • Rebuild damaged tissue and restore lost function

Quality of life
Anti-aging strategies can add to the quality of your life and health no matter how old you are. Studies have found people in their 40s, 50s, and 60s who start strength-training programs gain increased protection from injury.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) offers a number of ideas for staying healthy. Below are some of the CDC’s suggestions for healthy aging:

  • Don’t smoke. Each puff hastens the degenerative processes of aging. Plus, smoking lowers your aerobic capacity, making it harder for you to do the things you enjoy and making you feel old before your time.

  • Eat foods rich in antioxidants. Vitamins A, C, and E fight free-radical formation, the oxidation process that damages tissues. Eating 5-1/2 cups of fruits and vegetables daily will help you get enough of these vitamins. Among the best sources are broccoli, cauliflower, red peppers, and other red, yellow, and green vegetables.

  • Eat lots of fiber. Dietary fiber found in beans, broccoli, bran, and other complex carbohydrates helps lower cholesterol, aids digestion, and defends against some kinds of cancers.

  • Maintain healthy cholesterol levels. Keep your total cholesterol level below 200 mg/dL and your percentage of protective HDL cholesterol high. Following a diet that limits your fat intake to 30 percent or less of your total calories will help. Maintaining a healthy weight also is beneficial.

  • Control your blood pressure.

  • Exercise regularly. Age robs you of aerobic capacity. Performing 30 minutes of moderate activity on a nearly daily basis can help you retain your capacity.

  • Build strength. As you age, you lose muscle mass; this decreases your strength and agility, and reduces your ability to burn calories efficiently. Regular strength training can help reverse this trend.

  • Be flexible. Tight muscles limit your range of motion and increase your injury risk. A daily stretching routine that works each of your major muscle groups will help you stay supple.

  • Get enough sleep. While you rest, your body uses the nutrients you’ve consumed that day to repair the damage done by the day’s activities. Not getting enough sleep keeps your immune system from doing its job and keeps your body in a state of disrepair.

  • Take care of your back. Keep muscles that support the spine strong and supple with cardiovascular and flexibility exercises. Use good body mechanics while lifting, standing, or sitting for long periods of time.

  • Deal with stress. Stress is linked to many diseases and degenerative conditions associated with aging. Learn to look at problems as challenges and accept situations you can’t change.

  • Stay close to your friends and family. A circle of support helps you deal with problems better, feel healthier, and live longer.

  • Be nice. There’s a relationship between hostility, heart disease, and other stress-related problems. Look for reasons to be pleasant and to forgive people who make you angry. You may live longer as a result, and you’ll probably enjoy life more.

It’s never too late to start taking care of your physical and emotional health. Even one healthy change in your daily routine–like taking the stairs to your office–can make long-term, positive changes to the quality of your life. Learn more about how certain foods, particularly protein, can help slow the effects of aging from Fort HealthCare’s own Registered Dietician, Stephanie Nischik on Tuesday, Sept. 24.

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Can Prostate Problems Be Avoided?

 As men age, the prostate (which is located near the bladder and urethra) can become vulnerable to some health conditions. The two most common are an enlarged prostate and prostate cancer.


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As men age, the prostate (which is located near the bladder and urethra) can become vulnerable to some health conditions. The two most common are an enlarged prostate and prostate cancer.  

An enlarged prostate is not a medically serious condition. As the prostate grows, it can block the urethra, which carries urine from the bladder out of the body. As a result, men may face:

  • A frequent need to urinate – especially at night.

  • A weak, delayed or interrupted stream when urinating.

  • An inability to completely empty the bladder.

If a man has mild urinary symptoms, there are some steps to take for relief.

  • Limit coffee, alcohol, or spicy foods.

  • Don’t smoke.

  • Drink eight or more glasses of water every day.

  • Get into the habit of urinating as soon as the need arises.

  • Discuss your symptoms with your primary care provider.

Treatment for an enlarged prostate depends upon a man’s age and the type and severity of symptoms. If symptoms are not bothersome, then treatment is not always necessary.

If urinary problems become increasingly worse, there are medications that can be prescribed to shrink the prostate or relax the muscles around it – both of which improve the flow of urine. More severe symptoms may require surgery or special treatments.

Looking out for prostate cancer

In addition to the symptoms associated with an enlarged prostate, men with prostate cancer may also notice blood in the urine or back pain. Often, however, prostate cancer does not offer many signs until the latter stages of the disease.

Other than quitting smoking, exercising regularly, and eating a healthy diet, a man’s next best defense is to begin screening for prostate cancer at age 50. Men with a relative who has had prostate cancer may need to start screening at age 40. Screening usually involves a digital rectal exam and a blood test called the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test.

Once prostate cancer has been diagnosed, treatment depends on a number of factors—not only whether the cancer has spread, but also the man’s age, health, expected life span and level of concern about possible side effects.

Hormonal therapy, radiation therapy and/or surgical removal of the prostate gland (and, if the cancer has spread, the testicles) may be recommended. Brachytherapy, a relatively new treatment, involves placing radioactive “seeds” into or near the cancer to shrink tumors while minimizing exposure to surrounding healthy tissues. Older men with small, slow-growing cancers may be monitored to determine if treatment might be needed later.

Get a free prostate screening!

Fort HealthCare Urology Associates offers a free, baseline prostate screening for men ages 55 – 69 whom have not had prior prostate cancer diagnosis. This screening, valued at more than $140 and underwritten by Tomorrow’s Hope, includes a PSA blood test, a digital rectal exam and information about prostate cancer. The screening will be held Saturday, Sept. 28 at Fort HealthCare Urology Associates in Fort Atkinson. Call (920) 568-5244 to reserve your spot today!

To learn more about prostate health and related conditions, visit our Men’s Health Center at FortHealthCare.com/LetsDoThis.

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Pack it light, Wear it right™

Aching backs and shoulders? Tingling arms? Weakened muscles? Stooped posture? Does your child have these symptoms after wearing a heavy school backpack? Carrying too much weight in a pack or wearing it the wrong way can lead to pain and strain. Parents can take steps to help children load and wear backpacks the correct way to avoid health problems.


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Aching backs and shoulders? Tingling arms? Weakened muscles? Stooped posture? Does your child have these symptoms after wearing a heavy school backpack? Carrying too much weight in a pack or wearing it the wrong way can lead to pain and strain. Parents can take steps to help children load and wear backpacks the correct way to avoid health problems.

Loading a Pack

  • A child’s backpack should weigh no more than about 15% of his or her body weight. This means a student weighing 100 pounds shouldn’t wear a loaded school backpack heavier than about 15 pounds.
  • Load heaviest items closest to the child’s back (the back of the pack).
  • Arrange books and materials so they won’t slide around in the backpack.
  • Check what your child carries to school and brings home. Make sure the items are necessary for the day’s activities.
  • If the backpack is too heavy or tightly packed, your child can hand carry a book or other item outside the pack.
  • If the backpack is too heavy on a regular basis, consider using a book bag on wheels if your child’s school allows it.

Wearing a Pack

  • Distribute weight evenly by using both straps. Wearing a pack slung over one shoulder can cause a child to lean to one side, curving the spine and causing pain or discomfort.

  • Select a pack with well-padded shoulder straps. Shoulders and necks have many blood vessels and nerves that can cause pain and tingling in the neck, arms, and hands when too much pressure is applied.

  • Adjust the shoulder straps so that the pack fits snugly on the child’s back. A pack that hangs loosely from the back can pull the child backwards and strain muscles.

  • Wear the waist belt if the backpack has one. This helps distribute the pack’s weight more evenly.

  • The bottom of the pack should rest in the curve of the lower back. It should never rest more than four inches below the child’s waistline.

  • School backpacks come in different sizes for different ages. Choose the right size pack for your child as well as one with enough room for necessary school items.

To learn more about ways to keep your children healthy and happy, visit our Family Health Center at FortHealthCare.com/LetsDoThis.

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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Concussions – Taking Caution is a No-Brainer

The school bells will be ringing soon and your children will be back in the classroom. As your kids return to the fields or courts for another sports season, it is important to remember how to protect your kids, especially from concussions.


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News

School Nurses Urge Parents to Schedule Back-to-School Vaccinations

During the month of August, Vaccination Awareness Month, the Wisconsin Association of School Nurses (WASN) urges parents to plan ahead to have children vaccinated early before sending them back to school.

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Geoffrey Smith, DO Achieves Certified Wound Specialist Status

Geoffrey Smith, DO of the Fort HealthCare Wound & Edema Center, has recently been awarded the status of Certified Wound Specialist (CWS) by the American Board of Wound Management. The CWS board certification is a formal recognition of a master level knowledge and specialty practice in wound management.

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Fort HealthCare Welcomes New Orthopedic Surgeon

Fort Medical Group and Fort HealthCare Orthopaedic Associates are pleased to welcome a new surgeon to its team of providers. Paul Schuppner, D.O. joins Thomas Nordland, M.D., Isidoro Zambrano, M.D. and James Bruno, M.D. as of September 3. He will be seeing patients by appointment in the Fort Atkinson and Whitewater Fort HealthCare Orthopaedic Associates office locations. 


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Nursing Scholarships Available through Fort HealthCare Partners

Fort HealthCare’s Partners organization is pleased to announce applications are being accepted for two $1000 scholarships to be awarded to qualified applicants enrolled in an associate degree nursing program.


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Fort HealthCare’s McConnell Receives Biofeedback Certification

Becky McConnell, MPT, BCB-PMD, with Fort HealthCare Therapy & Sport Center, recently received certification from the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA). McConnell joins an elite group of professionals who have met the educational, clinical, ethical, and exam criteria required in order to become a certified provider of biofeedback services. The certification affirms her advanced training in using biofeedback in the treatment of a variety of bladder and bowel disorders including incontinence, voiding dysfunction, constipation, pelvic pain syndromes, and more.


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Second Annual Health Summit Advances Community Wellness

On August 21, Fort HealthCare hosted the second annual Healthy Community Summit at Fort Atkinson High School. Over 80 guests participated in the event, a meeting for health-minded members of the community and key influencers in population health management and positive health as well as wellness policy change. The goal of the summit was to further discuss efforts for creating healthy communities throughout Jefferson County and how to implement programs that can promote positive change in the health behaviors of residents throughout the region.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
September 8 Lake Mills Fitness Day
September 9 Continuing Yoga
September 10 Continuing Yoga
September 10 No Nonsense, Low Impact Workout
September 10 Weight Loss Surgery Seminar
September 11 AHA Heartsaver Family & Friends CPR
September 11 Yoga Express
September 13 Mad Pretzel Challenge: Bike Races and Rides
September 14 AHA Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
September 14 On My Own at Home
September 15 Tri for the Rock - Kids Triathlon
September 17 Movin’ and Losin’
September 17 Rusty Hinges
September 22 Discover Whitewater Half Marathon, 5K and Kids Shuffle
September 23 Zumba®
September 24 Slow the Effects of Aging with Protein!
September 25 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED
September 25 Skinny Arms Express
September 25 Zumba®
September 26 Zumba®
September 28 Free Prostate Screening
September 24 Nasal Congestion ... Is It Allergies or Something Else?
Recipes

Farfalle with Mint Walnut Pesto

  Serves: 4

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1/2 packed cup fresh basil (with stems)
  • 1/2 packed cup fresh mint (with stems)
  • 1/4 cup toasted unsalted walnuts
  • 3 tbsp grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 tsp fresh ground black pepper, plus additional to taste
  • 1 1/2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 8 oz whole-wheat farfalle (TRY: Hodgson Whole Wheat Bow Tie Pasta)
  • 2 cups grape tomatoes, halved
  • 9 oz frozen artichoke hearts, thawed and quartered
  • Sea salt, to taste


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Serves: 4

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1/2 packed cup fresh basil (with stems)
  • 1/2 packed cup fresh mint (with stems)
  • 1/4 cup toasted unsalted walnuts
  • 3 tbsp grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 tsp fresh ground black pepper, plus additional to taste
  • 1 1/2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 8 oz whole-wheat farfalle (TRY: Hodgson Whole Wheat Bow Tie Pasta)
  • 2 cups grape tomatoes, halved
  • 9 oz frozen artichoke hearts, thawed and quartered
  • Sea salt, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Meanwhile, prepare pesto: To a food processor, add basil, mint, walnuts, Parmesan and 1/4 tsp pepper. Pulse until roughly chopped, five to seven times, scraping down bowl as needed. Add oil and lemon juice and process for 10 to 15 seconds or until a thick, slightly chunky pesto forms. (NOTE: Try to not process to a smooth paste, keep it slightly chunky.)
  2. To boiling water, add pasta and cook al dente according to package directions. Before draining pasta, ladle about 1/2 cup cooking water into a heat-proof measuring cup and set aside. Return drained pasta to pot and add tomatoes, artichokes and pesto. Place on low heat and stir to combine. If more moisture is desired, add reserved pasta cooking water 1 tbsp at a time to achieve desired texture. Heat until vegetables are heated through, about 2 minutes. Season with salt and additional pepper.

Nutrients per serving (1 3/4 cups pesto pasta): Calories: 345, Total Fat: 13 g, Sat. Fat: 2 g, Monounsaturated Fat: 5 g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 4 g, Carbs: 52 g, Fiber: 12 g, Sugars: 4 g, Protein: 13 g, Sodium: 137 mg, Cholesterol: 3 mg

Recipe from: http://www.cleaneatingmag.com

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