Health365 eNews
September 2014 • Volume 6, Issue 7

2014 Slimdown Rock Star – Nick Hamele

This year’s Slimdown Rockstar is Nick Hamele, losing the most weight throughout the challenge. Nick lost a total of 76.8 pounds over the 12 week challenge. When asked what was the biggest change he made Nick replied, “I really paid close attention to my calorie intake every single day.  I used an online calorie tracker program (myfittnesspal.com). Then I weighed myself every day and was able to see how my good and bad choices made a difference.”


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This year’s Slimdown Rockstar is Nick Hamele, losing the most weight throughout the challenge. Nick lost a total of 76.8 pounds over the 12 week challenge. When asked what was the biggest change he made Nick replied, “I really paid close attention to my calorie intake every single day.  I used an online calorie tracker program (myfittnesspal.com). Then I weighed myself every day and was able to see how my good and bad choices made a difference.”

Nick also shared that that for him the hardest part of making the changes was just finally getting the drive to start.  After that, the first 3 weeks or so were tough, until he got used to the new routine and saw the positive difference it was making in his health and life. The easiest part of making the changes was understanding that he needed to make the changes.  Nick says that translating understanding into action-not so easy.

Slimdown is one of the community challenges sponsored by Fort HealthCare. Fit, Healthy, Happy are key goals of all the wellness challenges.  Select employers and community agencies teamed up to slim down. They formed teams of 4 to 6 coworkers, friends or family members and compete for prizes and good health in the 2014 Slimdown Challenge.

One of the key differences in this program is that it is a monitored challenge. All participants must complete an official weigh in at the beginning and weigh out at the end of the twelve weeks. Throughout the twelve weeks there are a number of educational and inspirational tools along with weekly incentives for team and individual participation. The individual goal is to work towards dropping 10% of your current weight. Community programs like these will help us all achieve our Vision to be the healthiest community in Wisconsin.

Nick’s advice for someone starting the weight loss journey:  “Find a reason and find support.  Find a reason why YOU want to lose weight, something that really gets at the core of who you are and what you want out of life.  Once you have a why then find a who.  Who is going to help you on your journey?  Who cares enough to pay attention to your successes and can call you on your slips.  Whose opinion do you hold in high enough regard that letting them down would be harder than staying on your plan?  Once you have your internal reason and an external support person or group, the rest is a piece of cake!”

Nick, you are a Slimdown Rockstar and an inspiration!

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Preventing Skin Cancer

Relaxing in the sun may feel good. But it isn’t good for your skin. In fact, being exposed to the sun’s harmful rays is a major cause of skin cancer. This is a serious disease that can be life-threatening. People of all ages and backgrounds are at risk. But in most cases, skin cancer can be prevented.


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Relaxing in the sun may feel good. But it isn’t good for your skin. In fact, being exposed to the sun’s harmful rays is a major cause of skin cancer. This is a serious disease that can be life-threatening. People of all ages and backgrounds are at risk. But in most cases, skin cancer can be prevented.

Your Role in Prevention

You can act today to help prevent skin cancer. Start by avoiding the sun’s UV (ultraviolet) rays. And don’t use tanning beds, which are no safer than the sun. Taking these steps can help keep you from getting skin cancer. It can also help prevent wrinkles and other sun-induced aging effects. Make sure your children also follow these safeguards. Now is the time to start taking preventive steps against skin cancer.

When You Are Outdoors

Protect your skin when you go outdoors during the day. Take precautions whenever you go out to eat, run errands by car or on foot, or do any outdoor activity. There isn’t just one easy way to protect your skin. It’s best to follow all of these steps:

  • Wear tightly woven clothing that covers your skin. Put on a wide-brimmed hat to protect your face, ears, and scalp.
  • Watch the clock. Try to avoid the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when it is strongest.
  • Head for the shade or create your own. Use an umbrella when sitting or strolling.
  • Know that the sun’s rays can reflect off sand, water, and snow. This can harm your skin. Take extra care when you are near reflective surfaces.
  • Keep in mind that even when the weather is hazy or cloudy, your skin can be exposed to strong UV rays.
  • Shield your skin with sunscreen. Also, apply sunscreen to your children’s skin.

Tips for Using Sunscreen

To help prevent skin cancer, choose the right sunscreen and use it correctly. Try the following tips:

  • Choose a sunscreen that has a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15. For the best protection, an SPF of at least 30 is preferred. Also, choose a sunscreen labeled “broad spectrum.” This will shield you from both UVA and UVB (ultraviolet A and B) rays.
  • If one brand irritates your skin, try another, particularly ones without fragrance.
  • Use a water-resistant sunscreen if swimming or sweating.
  • Reapply sunscreen every 2 hours. If you’re active, do this more often.
  • Cover any sun-exposed skin, from your face to your feet. Don’t forget your ears and your lips.
  • Know that while sunscreen helps protect you, it isn’t enough. You should also wear protective clothing. And try to stay out of the sun as much as you can, especially from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
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Avoiding Non-Impact Eye Injuries

You may think wearing goggles is enough to protect your eyes, but many injuries can happen to your eyes that goggles won’t prevent.Protecting them from the sun, dirt, dryness, and allergens is also important.


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You may think wearing goggles is enough to protect your eyes, but many injuries can happen to your eyes that goggles won’t prevent.Protecting them from the sun, dirt, dryness, and allergens is also important.

Practice prevention

To protect yourself and your family from eye injuries:

  • Keep your eyes moist. Dry, windy weather, certain medications and conditions, and menopause can make your eyes more prone to irritation. Using artificial tears and cleaning the eyelids with sterile pads can help.
  • Wear sunglasses with UV protection when outdoors. Make sure the label states that the lenses block 99 to 100 percent of both UVA and UVB rays. Any factor that increases your exposure to sunlight, such as prescription drugs that increase sensitivity to UV light, can increase the risk for eye problems. People who work outdoors or have outdoor hobbies, especially in the snow or near water, have the highest risk.
  • Avoid tanning beds. They can cause skin cancer and damage your eyes.
  • Wear chemical safety goggles when using hazardous solvents and detergents, such as cleaning fluids and ammonia. Always read instructions and labels carefully, work in a well-ventilated area, and make sure spray nozzles are pointed away from you before using. Wear safety goggles while working and wash your hands thoroughly when you’re finished.

Treating an injury

If you get an eye injury, see an eye doctor or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away, even if the injury seems minor. Delaying medical attention could result in permanent vision loss or blindness. 

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Water-Safety 101: Basic Guidelines

Every year, thousands of Americans are injured or killed in boating and swimming accidents. You can protect yourself and your family from such accidents by following these guidelines.


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Every year, thousands of Americans are injured or killed in boating and swimming accidents. You can protect yourself and your family from such accidents by following these guidelines.

Boating safety:

  • Check weather and water conditions before leaving shore.
  • Do not drink and boat. Alcohol is a factor in many boating accidents. Choose a designated boat driver who will not drink.
  • Insist that everyone wear a Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device or life jacket while on board.
  • Always tell someone where you’ll be boating, when you expect to be back, and what your boat looks like.
  • Keep Coast Guard-approved visual distress devices, such as pyrotechnic red flares, orange distress flags, or lights on board.
  • Do not carry more passengers than the maximum listed on the boat’s capacity plate.

Home-pool safety

Here’s how to keep your family safe:

  • Enclose your pool with a fence, wall, or other barrier at least 4 feet tall. Install self-latching gates that open outward.
  • Do not assume your child can swim. Many youngsters forget how to swim when panicked.
  • Keep a portable phone in the pool area and program emergency contacts on its speed dial.
  • Keep a close eye on children and nonswimmers who are using inflatable toys, inner tubes, and mattresses. They could slide off them and drown.
  • Closely supervise children when they are diving or jumping in the pool. Head and back injuries are likely to occur during these activities.
  • Keep the pool’s deck area clear of tripping hazards, such as toys, dishes, hoses, and the like.
  • Review safety measures and rules with guests before they swim.

Safety musts for children:

  • Never leave a young child alone in a bathtub, wading pool, swimming pool, lake, or river. If you must answer the phone or get a towel, take the child with you.
  • Be aware of backyard pools in your neighborhood or apartment building; your child could wander off and fall in.
  • Enroll children in swimming lessons taught by qualified instructors. But remember, the lessons won’t make children "drown-proof."
  • Teach your older children that they risk drowning when they overestimate their swimming ability or underestimate water depth.

Safety musts for adults:

  • Take swimming lessons from a qualified instructor if you’re not a strong, competent swimmer.
  • Don’t swim if you’ve been drinking alcohol.
  • Don’t swim alone or allow others to do so.
  • Stay out of the water during thunderstorms and other severe weather. During lightning storms, seek shelter away from metal objects, open areas, and large, lone trees.
  • Don’t exceed your swimming ability. Know your limits and stick to them.
  • Check the water level before diving into a pool, ocean, pond, reservoir, or lake. Always dive with your arms extended firmly over your head and your hands together.
  • Don’t dive into unknown bodies of water, such as lakes, rivers, quarries, or irrigation ditches. Jump feet first to avoid hitting your head (and breaking your neck or back) on a shallow bottom, hidden rock, or other obstruction.
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Save The Date

Fort HealthCare Frosty Rock Challenge slated for November 15th, 2014

FORT ATKINSON –  Save the date for the second annual Fort HealthCare Frosty Rock Challenge 5k &12k on Saturday, November 15th. Beginning at the Fort HealthCare Therapy & Sport Center in Fort Atkinson, participants will have a choice between a 5k road course run or walk and a 12k mixed course run.  New this year is a one-mile kids’ run, age-group awards and a “no T-shirt” charitable contribution option.  


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Fort HealthCare Frosty Rock Challenge slated for November 15th, 2014

FORT ATKINSON –  Save the date for the second annual Fort HealthCare Frosty Rock Challenge 5k &12k on Saturday, November 15th. Beginning at the Fort HealthCare Therapy & Sport Center in Fort Atkinson, participants will have a choice between a 5k road course run or walk and a 12k mixed course run.  New this year is a one-mile kids’ run, age-group awards and a “no T-shirt” charitable contribution option.  

On the 12k course, runners will amble through the oak savannah, past the marshes and wetlands, and over the prairie at Dorothy Carnes County Park. If the distance or the course seems intimidating, the 5k course takes in neighborhood views of Fort Atkinson. All three courses start and end at Fort HealthCare’s Therapy & Sport Center, 1504 Madison Avenue, Fort Atkinson. Chip timing is provided by It’s Race Time, Inc.

Early bird registration opens May 27, 2014. Participants registering by September 14th receive a $10 discount on registration fees.  Registrations by November 7th provide for a $5 discount.  After that date, the fee for the 12k mixed course race is $45 and the fee for the 5k run/walk is $35.  Kid’s fees are $10 entrance fee or $15 entrance fee with a t-shirt.  All kids will receive a medal.  On-line registration closes on Thursday, November 13th.  All participants pre-registered by October 15 will receive a race shirt.

This year the Frosty Rock Challenge will benefit The Jefferson County Cancer Coalition, a non-profit organization that provides financial assistance to cancer victims and their families in Jefferson County, Wisconsin.  The coalition was formed in an effort to raise funds to help friends and neighbors through difficult times.

The Frosty Rock Challenge is presented by Fort HealthCare Therapy & Sport Center, Fort HealthCare Orthopaedic Associates and Fort HealthCare Integrated Family Care.

Silver level sponsors to date are Alden Estates and Fort Community Credit Union.  Individuals or organizations looking to participate as gold, silver or in-kind sponsors should contact Amie Ramczyk, Fort HealthCare Therapy & Sport Center at amie.ramczyk@forthc.com.

To learn more about the Frosty Rock Challenge and download training plans, become a volunteer, or register as a participant, visit FortHealthCare.com/FrostyRock.

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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Bad Food, Not Bad Genes

We all know we are in the middle of an obesity epidemic in the United States. Indeed, worldwide obesity is an increasing problem. Researchers from the University of Cambridge conducted a very simple study. They looked at where people commuted to work, and whether there was any association between going by fast-food places and obesity and diabetes.


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News

Camp 911 Joined by Over 70 Campers!

Fort HealthCare’s Camp 911 was filled to capacity for the first session held in 2014. On Tuesday, June 17 over 70 campers participated in the day filled with activities and learning related to safety, prevention, and health and wellness.

Collaborating agencies with Fort HealthCare included H&H Fire, Whitewater Fire Department, the Jefferson County K-9 Unit, Fort Atkinson Police Department, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Ryan Brothers Ambulance, a Jefferson County 911 Dispatcher, and UW Medflight.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
July 8 Weight-Loss Surgery Seminar
July 10 Brother, Sister: Sibling-to-Be
July 12 On My Own at Home
July 15 Aqua Zumba®
July 16 Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) - Recognition Course
July 18 Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Provider Certification - Renewal Course
July 21 Basic ECG Class
July 22 Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Provider Certification - Renewal Course
July 23 AHA Advance Cardiovascular Life Support Renewal Course
July 23 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED
July 23 Body Blast
July 23 Glutes & Abs
July 23 Skinny Arms Express
July 26 AHA Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
July 28 Critical Care Classes
July 28 Zumba®
July 30 Red Cross Babysitting
July 30 Zumba®
July 31 Basic T ai Chi
July 31 Continuing T ai Chi
July 31 Corrections T'ai Chi
July 31 Zumba®
August 4 Basic Life Support (BLS) for HealthCare Provider Certification
August 4 Childbirth Preparation Classes
August 6 AHA Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
August 7 Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Provider Certification - Renewal Course
August 10 Having Healthy Babies
August 12 Healthy-Steps
August 12 Red Cross Babysitting
August 13 Camp 911
August 15 Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Provider Certification
August 16 On My Own at Home
Recipes

Poblano Corn Chowder

Ingredients

  • 8 ears of fresh corn
  • 2 poblano peppers, chopped
  • 2 chipotle chilies, whole
  • 2 tablespoons adobo sauce
  • 5 medium russet potatoes
  • 8 cups of chicken broth
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 orange bell pepper, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 1 cup cream
  • 8 ounces monterey jack cheese
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • Cilantro garnish


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Ingredients

  • 8 ears of fresh corn
  • 2 poblano peppers, chopped
  • 2 chipotle chilies, whole
  • 2 tablespoons adobo sauce
  • 5 medium russet potatoes
  • 8 cups of chicken broth
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 orange bell pepper, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 1 cup cream
  • 8 ounces monterey jack cheese
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • Cilantro garnish

directions

Cut potatoes into one inch cubes and remove the corn from the cobs. Set aside in a large bowl. Boil the broth and the corn cobs together for about 15-20 minutes. Remove the cobs cool. Scrape the remaining corn bits into the pot of broth and rest 10 minutes.

Melt butter and sauté the chopped onions and bell peppers in a skillet until slightly tender. Add  garlic and poblano peppers and sauté until tender. Add sautéed mix, chipotle and adobo sauce to the broth.

Bring to a boil and simmer about 5 minutes. Add potatoes and corn and simmer until potatoes are slightly tender. Turn off the heat. Add cream and serve.

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