Health365 eNews
September 2014 • Volume 4, Issue 7

6 Vital Nutrients Women May Be Missing

A woman’s physiology can make it harder to hang onto some nutrients, too. Women also are more likely than men to develop an eating disorder, which makes it difficult to maintain healthy nutrition.


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Women’s diets often fall short in vital minerals and vitamins.

A woman’s physiology can make it harder to hang onto some nutrients, too. Women also are more likely than men to develop an eating disorder, which makes it difficult to maintain healthy nutrition. Here are six nutrients that women are often deficient in, either because they lose too much of a nutrient, don’t get enough of a nutrient, or both.

  1. Calcium
    Why you need it: Calcium builds teeth and bones, curbs premenstrual syndrome, helps maintain normal blood pressure, and may protect against colon cancer. It is also needed for muscle contraction, hormones and enzymes, and nervous system function, according to the American Dietetic Association. Nearly all of the body’s calcium is stored in the teeth and bones.Women’s risk for bone loss rises at menopause with waning levels of estrogen, a hormone that helps keep calcium in your bones. Getting adequate calcium, vitamin D, and exercise as a child and teen can lessen the impact of bone loss later in life, the National Osteoporosis Foundation says.What you need: 1,000 mg a day for women of childbearing age; 1,200 mg a day after menopause.The problem: More than three out of four women don’t get the recommended amount of calcium, according to the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS), part of the National Institutes of Health. Many weight-conscious women forgo dairy products, calcium’s richest source. Even when women include dairy products in their diet, however, the amount of calcium they absorb can be affected by age, pregnancy, and the amount of vitamin D they consume, the ODS says. The amount of calcium you absorb declines with age. Although some plant-based foods, such as spinach and collard greens, contain significant amounts of calcium, this source of calcium may not be absorbed as well as the calcium found in dairy products.

    The remedy: Choose more dairy foods. A cup of low-fat yogurt, milk, or cottage cheese provides about 300 mg of calcium. Good nondairy choices include kale, turnip greens, almonds, dried figs, and fortified foods, such as breakfast cereals and fruit juices. Weight-bearing exercise like brisk walking prevents calcium loss from bones. Research has shown that for women at risk for fractures, taking calcium and vitamin D supplements alone after menopause is not enough to protect against fractures. Additional medicines may be necessary. A diet rich in fruits and vegetables and regular weight-bearing exercise are essential to bone health for women of all ages.

  2. Vitamin D
    Why you need it: Vitamin D helps the body maintain normal levels of calcium and phosphorus in the blood, and helps form and maintain strong bones, the ODS says. It also may help maintain a healthy immune system and help healthy cell growth and development. It helps prevent rickets, a condition in children that weakens the bones. There is also evidence that vitamin D may help prevent falls by improving muscle strength.What you need: 200 IU a day for women up to age 50, 400 IU for ages 51 to 70, and 600 IU for those 71 and older. For women older than 60 and for women with additional risk factors for osteoporosis or a low intake of calcium and vitamin D, 600 to 800 IU may be needed.The problem: The primary source of vitamin D is your body; your body makes vitamin D when your skin is exposed to the sun’s ultraviolet rays. But getting vitamin D this way may be difficult for some women. People who are 50 and older don’t make vitamin D as efficiently as younger people; people who live in northern climates may not get enough sun exposure, particularly during the winter months; people who don’t spend time outdoors are unable to make vitamin D. Vitamin D levels also have declined because of widespread sunscreen use. Sunscreen blocks the ultraviolet rays that can damage the skin — but these same rays cause the body to produce vitamin D.The remedy: Get 10 to 15 minutes of unprotected sun exposure at least two times a week on the face, arms, hands, or back, the ODS says. After that time, you should protect yourself with a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Fortified foods are another source of vitamin D, the ODS says. A cup of skim milk provides about 200 IU of vitamin D; the vitamin is also found in eggs, salmon, and organ meats. A supplement can supply vitamin D, too. Women should begin taking vitamin D supplements as teens and continue throughout life.
  3. Iron
    Why you need it: Iron is used to help the blood carry oxygen throughout the body. If you don’t get enough iron in your diet, you may feel fatigued. Too much iron, however, can be fatal.What you need: 18 mg a day for menstruating women; 27 mg a day for pregnant women; 9 mg a day for women who are breast-feeding; and 8 mg day for women after menopause.The problem: Iron deficiency is usually a problem only for women who have not gone through menopause; women mainly lose iron from menstrual bleeding. Iron levels may also fall if you:

    • Don’t eat iron-fortified foods, plant foods that contain iron (such as lentils or beans), or red meat, fish, or poultry
    • Use aspirin, which causes microscopic bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract
    • Don’t get enough vitamin A; this vitamin helps the body use stored iron

    Iron deficiency develops gradually. Anemia from iron deficiency may be caused by too little iron in the diet, inadequate absorption of iron, or excessive blood loss, the ODS says. The type of iron you eat influences how well you absorb iron. Heme iron, which comes from meat, is absorbed efficiently. Nonheme iron, which is found in rice, corn, black beans, soybeans, and wheat, is not absorbed as completely. Absorption of this type of iron also is affected by other foods in the diet.

    The remedy: You absorb iron best from meat and fish, so adding grilled chicken to a salad is a plus. Nonmeat eaters can opt for iron-rich combos. Try kale or beet greens tossed with raisins, nosh on dried apricots and nuts, and lace enriched cereals with blackstrap molasses. To boost absorption, combine iron-rich foods with orange juice and other foods that contain vitamin C. Don’t take an iron supplement without a doctor’s guidance, because excess iron can harm the heart, liver, and other organs.

  4. Folate
    Why you need it: Folate is a water-soluble B vitamin. It helps make red blood cells, prevent birth defects such as neural tube defects and spina bifida, and lower homocysteine levels.What you need: 400 micrograms a day; 500 micrograms a day for women who are pregnant; 600 micrograms a day for women who are breastfeeding.The problem: Although many foods are now fortified with folate, certain medical conditions and medications may increase the need for this B vitamin, the ODS says. (Folate is the form of this vitamin found naturally in food; folic acid is the form found in dietary supplements and fortified foods.) Medical conditions that increase the need for folate include pregnancy and breast-feeding; alcohol abuse; kidney dialysis; liver disease; and anemia. Medications that interfere with folate include drugs to treat epilepsy, diabetes, colitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Barbiturates also may interfere with folate.The remedy: Dark greens provide the highest amounts of folate. A cup of cooked spinach provides 200 micrograms. Other foods rich in this B vitamin include navy beans, oranges, and fortified grains. Ask your doctor about supplements.
  5. Vitamin C
    Why you need it: To help make connective tissues, strengthen blood vessels and gums, and boost infection-fighting cells.What you need: 75 mg per day; 85 mg a day for pregnant women; 120 mg day for women who are breast-feeding; and an additional 35 mg for smokers.The problem: Many busy women find it tough to eat enough fruits and vegetables, as recommended by USDA dietary guidelines.The remedy: Think fresh and raw, then plan ahead to include citrus fruits and dark veggies for every meal and snack. On the run, grab salads and fruit bowls that feature cantaloupe, papaya, kiwi, green peppers, or broccoli.
  6. Magnesium
    Why you need it: Magnesium helps produce the energy in your cells, keep your muscles and nerves working, keep heart rhythm steady, keep your immune system healthy, and build bone, the ODS says. It regulates blood pressure and blood sugar.What you need: Women need 310 to 320 mg; 350 to 360 mg if pregnant.The problem: Americans tend to fall 100 mg short. That may tip the scales against bone strength. Processed food junkies miss out on magnesium.The remedy: Switch to whole, fresh, nutrient-dense foods. Trade iceberg lettuce for spinach (a half cup provides 65 mg); chips for nuts (an ounce of almonds provides 86 mg), and white bread for bran (134 mg per slice).

 

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Take the Sting Out of Bug Bites

How many times has the perfect summer trip to the beach or a barbecue in the neighbor’s yard been interrupted by the cry of a child after he or she has been stung? Summer days go hand in hand with creepy-crawlers of all shapes, sizes and sting-ability. Knowing how to prevent and cope with insect bites will minimize discomfort and avoid more serious conditions.


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How many times has the perfect summer trip to the beach or a barbecue in the neighbor’s yard been interrupted by the cry of a child after he or she has been stung? Summer days go hand in hand with creepy-crawlers of all shapes, sizes and sting-ability. Knowing how to prevent and cope with insect bites will minimize discomfort and avoid more serious conditions.

Although bug bites and stings are generally easy to treat at home, infants and children may be more affected than adults and severe allergic reactions can develop. The following symptoms are a sign of a severe reaction requiring immediate emergency medical care:

  • difficulty breathing
  • a swelling of the lips or throat
  • feeling faint
  • feeling disoriented
  • hives
  • nausea, cramps and vomiting
  • a rapid heartbeat

Most bites and stings are not serious and require only home treatment. Here are some treatments for common bites:

  • Bee stings. Try to remove the stinger by scraping or brushing it off with a firm edge, such as a credit card. Disinfect the area and apply hydrocortisone cream, calamine lotion or a baking soda paste to the sting several times a day until symptoms subside. To reduce pain and swelling, apply ice or a cold pack and take an antihistamine.
  • Spider bites. Clean the area with soap and water, apply a cool compress and keep the affected limb elevated to about heart level. If your child experiences any severe reactions, call your doctor or 911 immediately for further treatment.
  • Tick bites. You can prevent Lyme disease if you detect ticks early, since contraction is unlikely if a tick has been attached to skin for less than 48 hours. After your child spends time outdoors, thoroughly check his or her skin—both body and scalp—for ticks and rashes. If you find a tick, remove both the tick’s head and body. Use tweezers and pull the tick straight out. Wash your hands thoroughly after removal.
  • Mosquito bites. Most mosquito bites do little more than cause itching, redness and general discomfort, but West Nile virus is a mosquito-borne illness. Thwart the breeding of mosquitoes by emptying standing water in your child’s swimming pool and toys and pet dishes.

Follow these simple steps to keep bites at bay:

  • Apply insect repellent to all exposed skin, except near the eyes, mouth, open cuts or hands of small children, before heading to woods and grassy areas.
  • Select clothing that covers the body.
  • Refrain from using perfumed lotions or shampoos.
  • Use insect repellents that contain 10 percent to 30 percent DEET, and only apply once a day. Soy- and citronella-based products are also generally considered safe for kids.
  • Once home, wash off repellent as soon as possible.

 

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Battling Prostate Problems with a Free Screening

At some point in their lives, most men will be affected by prostate problems. Proper detection and treatment, however, can alleviate and even cure most prostate disorders.


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A fight you can win

At some point in their lives, most men will be affected by prostate problems. Proper detection and treatment, however, can alleviate and even cure most prostate disorders.

Despite its walnut size and weight of just an ounce, the prostate plays a prominent role in a man’s urinary and sexual health. The prostate produces fluid that transports semen through the penis. If the prostate is enlarged for any reason, it can press on the urethra and cause urinary problems.

Symptoms of prostate disease include pain, burning and difficulty in urinating; blood in the urine or semen; painful ejaculation; and lower back pain.

Prostate problems
Experts believe diet, race, heredity and the aging process may all lead to prostate trouble. The three most common problems associated with the prostate are:

  • Prostatitis. This condition develops when the prostate swells or becomes inflamed, usually caused by bacterial infection.
  • Benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH. A normal prostate can also grow many times in size when hormonal changes occur after age 40, causing BPH.
  • Prostate cancer. Even though prostate cancer is one of the most diagnosed cancers in America, on average men have only a 3 percent risk of actually dying from the disease. Tumors are often slow-growing and highly treatable. However, patients sometimes experience no symptoms until the cancer has spread. Thus, early detection by your doctor is important.

Many treatment options
Treatments for prostatitis and BPH include a low-fat diet and medications. Chemotherapy, surgery and radiation target prostate cancer. But sometimes, all that is needed is watchful waiting for slow-growing tumors for men over 70. Contact your doctor to see which treatment is right for you.

Screening guidelines
It’s important for you to get your prostate checked. The American Urological Association recommends:

  • A digital rectal exam (DRE) once a year after age 40, or earlier if you are having symptoms. Although some men consider this test embarrassing, it is a quick, simple procedure that could save your life.
  • PSA (prostate-specific antigen) blood tests once a year for men over 50, or earlier for men in high risk groups, such as African-Americans or those with a family history of prostate problems.

If you have a positive DRE or PSA, your doctor may order a biopsy to determine if cancer is involved in your prostate symptoms.

Fort HealthCare is offering a free prostate screening on Saturday, September 22 from 7:30 – 11:30 a.m. at Fort HealthCare Urology Associates. The screening, valued at $140, includes a PSA test, digital rectal exam and written information about prostate cancer. The cost is underwritten by Tomorrow’s Hope. Call (920) 568-5244 to make an appointment.

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Are You Getting Enough Fruits and Vegetables Daily?

Many of us used the old Food Pyramid, also called My Pyramid, for years to help make sure we were following a balanced diet. Its replacement, called Choose My Plate, was introduced in 2011, along with updated dietary and exercise guidelines. The latest revision includes information on how to increase the amount of fruits and vegetables in your diet, as well as material on healthy and unhealthy fats and carbohydrate choices. It also includes physical activity recommendations. The recommendation to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables is constant with past dietary guidelines.


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Many of us used the old Food Pyramid, also called My Pyramid, for years to help make sure we were following a balanced diet. Its replacement, called Choose My Plate, was introduced in 2011, along with updated dietary and exercise guidelines. The latest revision includes information on how to increase the amount of fruits and vegetables in your diet, as well as material on healthy and unhealthy fats and carbohydrate choices. It also includes physical activity recommendations. The recommendation to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables is constant with past dietary guidelines.

Vegetables are a major source of fiber. They’re also packed with vitamins needed for health and growth. At mealtimes, make half your plate fruits and vegetables.

Nutrient-Rich Choices
Fresh, frozen, or canned—all vegetables are high in nutrients. The color of the skin tells you what’s inside. So if you eat plenty of colors, you get a variety of nutrients. Some good choices include:

  • Dark green vegetables, such as spinach, collard greens, kale, and broccoli.
  • Bright red and orange vegetables, such as carrots, sweet potatoes, red bell peppers, and tomatoes.
  • Starchy vegetables, such as potatoes and squash.

What Makes Vegetables Less Healthy?
Boiling vegetables causes some vitamins to escape into the water. To hold onto vitamins, briefly steam, sauté, stir-fry, or microwave instead. Overcooking destroys vitamins, so try to keep vegetables a little crispy.

  • Using a lot of margarine, butter, or salad dressing adds fat and calories, but not many nutrients. A small amount of these toppings is okay. But the more you add, the more fat you add, too.
  • Frozen vegetables that come with cheese sauce or other processed flavoring are high in fat and salt. It’s healthier to season plain frozen vegetables yourself. Try fresh herbs, garlic, toasted almonds, or sesame seeds.
  • Canned vegetables often have lots of salt. Shop for low-sodium varieties.

In general, 1 cup of raw or cooked vegetables or vegetable juice, or 2 cups of raw leafy greens can be considered as one serving from the vegetable group. See this chart for specific amounts that count as 1 cup of vegetables for your recommended intake.

Like vegetables, fruit contains fiber and plenty of vitamins. But the great thing about fruit is its flavor. If you have a sweet tooth or just want a little treat, fruit is the healthiest way to indulge. And you’re probably not eating as much of it as you should. An apple a day doesn’t cut it anymore. At mealtimes, make half your plate fruits and vegetables.

Nutrient-Rich Choices
Most fruit is seasonal. So, your options change with the time of year. Take advantage of the seasons to keep healthy eating fresh. Most of your fruit should come from whole fruit. Nutrient-rich choices include:

  • Any fruit that’s fresh, frozen, or canned in its own juice (no added sugar).
  • 100% fruit juice, such as orange juice. (Be aware that even 100% juice is high in calories, and juice has less fiber than whole fruit. One small glass a day is enough.)

What Makes Fruit Less Healthy?

  • Added fat, sugar, or processed flour makes fruit less healthy. This means desserts like pastries, pies, and sorbet. Try a fruit salad or a smoothie instead.
  • Fruit canned in heavy syrup contains added sugar. Check the label to find out if the fruit is canned in syrup. If it is, rinse the fruit before eating it, and don’t drink the syrup.
  • Juice with sugar added (not 100% fruit juice) contains a lot of calories and very little nutrition. You may already know that soda has a ton of sugar in it, but believe it or not, so do most juice drinks! Instead, try sparkling water with a dash of juice.
  • Dried fruit has less vitamin C and more calories than fresh fruit. It’s okay from time to time. Just remember, it’s not as good for you as fresh fruit.

In general, 1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice, or ½ cup of dried fruit can be considered as 1 cup from the Fruit Group. See this chart for specific amounts that count as 1 cup of fruit for your recommended intake.

Need diet help? Fort HealthCare’s Nutrition Services treats healthy individuals as well as those being seen for acute or chronic illness or conditions. Their program is for anyone who has concerns or questions about their diet, foods, growth and development, special diets or healthy eating. Call the Nutrition Services Department at (920) 568-5453 for more information.

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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Treating a Sunburn for a Pain Free Summer

So you lost track of time, forgot to reapply your sunscreen, fell asleep in a comfy deck chair at the Aquatic Center – that happens to the many of us every now and then. And a painful sunburn is the price we pay.


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News

State Concussion Law Improves Safety for Area Youth Athletes

State Law Act 172, referred to as the Sideline to Safety Law, was designed to ensure proper care to youth athletes and will influence how coaches and parents treat concussions that occur in school athletics and recreational leagues. High school athletes today are four-times more likely to sustain a concussion than a decade ago. Fort HealthCare’s Therapy & Sport Center is the only credentialed ImPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing) provider in the area. ImPACT is a computerized neurocognitive assessment tool used to determine an athlete’s readiness to return to play after a concussion. Widely used by collegiate and professional sports teams, it is the most scientifically validated computerized concussion evaluation system.


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Fort HealthCare Call for Artist Drawings

Fort HealthCare has issued a call for artist drawings related to health and wellness in our community. Ten winning entries will be selected by a panel of judges and transferred, to stairwells in Fort Memorial Hospital, by artist Jeff Haberman of Jefferson. The stairwell project was initiated by the Fort HealthCare Employee Wellness Committee as a way to encourage staff and visitors to take the stairs by creating a more inviting and energizing place to walk.


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Fort HealthCare Offers CPR Training for Jefferson County Inmates

On June 8th, Fort HealthCare teamed up with the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department to offer jail inmates a chance to participate in a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training course. CPR is a combination of chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth assisted breathing used to restore oxygen in a person who has stopped breathing. Corinna Bindrim, the American Heart Association Coordinator at Fort HealthCare, worked with Sheriff’s Deputy Tina Blake and Sheriff Paul Milbrath in providing this first time opportunity to the inmates.


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Second Annual Camp 911 a Success

Fort HealthCare’s second annual Camp 911, was held on Wednesday, June 13 at Fort Memorial Hospital for third through sixth grade students. Camp 911 was a one-day program focusing on safety, prevention techniques and increasing awareness of health and wellness.


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Dane County Honor Guard Recognizes Fort HealthCare

Fort HealthCare recently provided the Dane County Honor Guard with a donation allowing for the purchase of a member’s uniform. Pictured, Deb Trieloff, commander, presents James Nelson, Fort HealthCare vice president of finance and strategic development, with a Special Recognition Award for the support provided. Also pictured, are Zo Wilson, Fort HealthCare Emergency Services RN and Marine Corps veteran of 11 years, James Mildenstein, Fort HealthCare ER tech and honor guard member, Larry Trieloff, honor guard financial officer and Chris Suttinger, Fort HealthCare surgical tech and Army veteran of 15 years.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
July 11 Jefferson County Fair
January 1 Brother, Sister: Sibling-to-Be
January 1 Whitewater Relay for Life
January 1 Tri for the Rock Swim
January 1 Tomorrow’s Hope Walk Fest
January 1 Red Cross Babysitting
January 1 Rusty Hinges
January 1 Basic T’ai Chi
January 1 Continuing T’ai Chi
January 1 Corrections T’ai Chi
January 1 On My Own at Home
January 1 Free Men’s Health Talk
January 1 Lake Ripley Ride
January 1 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED
January 1 Healthy Steps
January 1 Having Healthy Babies
January 1 Free Health Screening at Fort HealthCare Internal Medicine & Pediatrics
January 1 Prairie Challenge Mud Run
January 1 Carbone’s Race for Research
Recipes

Black Bean and Pineapple Salad with Radicchio and Cilantro in a Lime Vinaigrette

Submitted by Colleen Miller, Fort HealthCare Executive Chef



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Submitted by Colleen Miller, Fort HealthCare Executive Chef

2 cups of Black Beans
½ cup celery
½ cup red onion
1 cup diced fresh pineapple (or mango)
¼ cup chopped cilantro
1 cup of radicchio (or spinach or romaine)
Lime Vinaigrette
¼ cup fresh lime juice
¼ cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil (or sunflower oil, or canola oil)
½ Tbs Grey Poupon mustard
Sea Salt and Cracked Pepper to taste

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