Health365 eNews
May 2015 • Volume 7, Issue 5

Controlling High Blood Pressure

May is noted to be “National high blood pressure education month”, which is appropriate as high blood pressure (hypertension) is called the silent killer. This is because many people who have it don’t know it. High blood pressure is 140/90 or higher. Know your blood pressure and remember to check it regularly. Doing so can save your life. Here are some things you can do to help control your blood pressure.


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Choose heart-healthy foods

  • Select low-salt, low-fat foods.
  • Limit canned, dried, cured, packaged, and fast foods. These can contain a lot of salt.
  • Eat 8 to 10 servings of  fruits and vegetables every day.
  • Choose lean meats, fish, or chicken.
  • Eat whole-grain pasta, brown rice, and beans.
  • Eat 2 to 3 servings of low-fat or fat-free dairy products
  • Ask your doctor about the DASH eating plan. This plan helps reduce blood pressure.

Maintain a healthy weight

  • Ask your health care provider how many calories to eat a day. Then stick to that number.
  • Ask your health care provider what weight range is healthiest for you. If you are overweight, a weight loss of only 3% to 5% of your body weight can help lower blood pressure.
  • Limit snacks and sweets.
  • Get regular exercise.

Get up and get active

  • Choose activities you enjoy. Find ones you can do with friends or family.
  • Park farther away from building entrances.
  • Use stairs instead of the elevator.
  • When you can, walk or bike instead of driving.
  • Rake leaves, garden, or do household repairs.
  • Be active at a moderate to vigorous level of physical activity for at least 40 minutes for a minimum of 3 to 4 days a week.

Manage stress

  • Make time to relax and enjoy life. Find time to laugh.
  • Visit with family and friends, and keep up with hobbies.

Limit alcohol and quit smoking

  • Men should have no more than 2 drinks per day.
  • Women should have no more than 1 drink per day.
  • Talk with your health care provider about quitting smoking. Smoking increases your risk for heart disease and stroke. Ask about local or community programs that can help.

Medications

  • If lifestyle changes aren’t enough, your health care provider may prescribe high blood pressure medicine. Take all medications as prescribed.
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Sun safety and Melanoma awareness

Sun safety for the entire family

While everybody needs some sun exposure to produce vitamin D (which helps in the absorption of calcium for stronger and healthier bones), unprotected exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can cause damage to the skin, eyes, and immune system. It can also cause cancer. Although there are other contributing factors, including heredity and environment, sunburn and excessive UV light exposure does damage the skin, and this damage can lead to skin cancer.


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Sun safety for the entire family

While everybody needs some sun exposure to produce vitamin D (which helps in the absorption of calcium for stronger and healthier bones), unprotected exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can cause damage to the skin, eyes, and immune system. It can also cause cancer. Although there are other contributing factors, including heredity and environment, sunburn and excessive UV light exposure does damage the skin, and this damage can lead to skin cancer.

What does tanning do to the skin?

Tanning is the skin’s response to UV light. When UV rays reach the skin, the skin makes more melanin. Melanin is the pigment that causes tanning. Tanning does not prevent skin cancer.

What is ultraviolet radiation?

Energy from the sun reaches the earth as visible, infrared, and ultraviolet (UV) rays.

  • Ultraviolet A (UVA) is made up of wavelengths 320 to 400 nm (nanometers) in length.
  • Ultraviolet B (UVB) wavelengths are 280 to 320 nm.
  • Ultraviolet C (UVC) wavelengths are 100 to 280 nm.

Only UVA and UVB ultraviolet rays reach the earth’s surface. The earth’s atmosphere absorbs UVC wavelengths.

  • UVB rays cause a much greater risk of skin cancer than UVA.
  • However, UVA rays cause aging, wrinkling, and loss of elasticity.
  • UVA also increases the damaging effects of UVB, including skin cancer and cataracts.

In most cases, ultraviolet rays react with called melanin. This is the first defense against the sun, as it is the melanin that absorbs the dangerous UV rays that can do serious skin damage. A sunburn develops when the amount of UV damage exceeds the protection that the skin’s melanin can provide. While a small amount of exposure to sunlight is healthy and pleasurable, too much can be dangerous. Measures should be taken to prevent overexposure to sunlight in order to reduce the risks of cancers, premature aging of the skin, the development of cataracts, and other harmful effects.

How can you protect yourself against the sun’s harmful rays?

The best means of protecting yourself against the damaging effects of the sun is by limiting exposure and protecting the skin.

The best way to prevent sunburn in children over 6 months of age is to follow the “Be Sun Smartsm” tips from the American Academy of Dermatology:

  • Generously apply a broad-spectrum water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF (Sun Protection Factor) of at least 30 to all exposed skin. “Broad-spectrum” means the sunscreen protects you from both UVA and UVB rays. Re-apply about every two hours and after swimming or sweating.
  • Wear protective clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat, and sunglasses, whenever possible
  • Seek shade when appropriate. Remember that the sun’s rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. If your shadow is shorter than you are, seek shade.
  • Use extra caution near water, snow, and sand. They reflect the damaging rays of the sun which can increase your chances of sunburn.
  • Get vitamin D through a healthy diet that may include vitamin supplements.
  • Do not use tanning beds. Ultraviolet light from the sun and tanning beds can cause skin cancer and wrinkling. If you want to look tan, try using a self-tanning product, but also use sunscreen with it.
  • Check your birthday suit on your birthday. If you notice anything changing, growing, bleeding on your skin, see a doctor right away. Skin cancer is very treatable when caught early.

Remember, sand and pavement reflect UV rays even while under an umbrella. Snow and water are also good reflectors of UV rays. Reflective surfaces can reflect most of the damaging sun rays.

Also, take special care to purchase protective eye wear for you and your children. Purchase sunglasses with labels ensuring they provide UV protection.

Be sure to remember that many over-the-counter and prescription medications increase the skin’s sensitivity to UV rays. As a result, people can develop a severe sunburn in just minutes when taking certain medications. Read medication labels carefully and use extra sunscreen as needed.

What are sunscreens?

Sunscreens protect the skin against sunburns and play an important role in blocking the penetration of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, no sunscreen blocks UV radiation 100 percent.

Terms used on sunscreen labels can be confusing. The protection provided by a sunscreen is indicated by the sun protection factor (SPF) listed on the product label. A product with an SPF higher than 15 is recommended for daily use. Sunscreens contain ingredients that help absorb UV light, whereas sunblocks contain ingredients that physically scatter and reflect UVB light. Keep in mind that most sunblock products do not protect against UVA rays. Look for products that have “broad spectrum” coverage that includes protection from UVA rays.

How to use sunscreens

A sunscreen protects from sunburn and minimizes suntan by absorbing UV rays. Using sunscreens correctly is important in protecting the skin. Consider the following recommendations:

  • Choose a sunscreen for children and test it on your child’s wrist before using. If your child develops skin or eye irritation, choose another brand. Apply the sunscreen very carefully around the eyes.
  • Choose a broad-spectrum sunscreen that filters out both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays.
  • Apply sunscreens to all exposed areas of skin, including easily overlooked areas, such as the rims of the ears, the lips, the back of the neck, and tops of the feet.
  • Use sunscreens for all children over 6 months of age, regardless of skin or complexion type, because all skin types need protection from UV rays. Even dark-skinned children can have painful sunburns.
  • Apply sunscreens 30 minutes before going out into the sun to give it time to work. Use it liberally and reapply it every two hours after being in the water or after exercising or sweating. Sunscreens are not just for the beach – use them when you are working in the yard or participating in sports.
  • Use a waterproof or water-resistant sunscreen and re-apply after swimming or sweating heavily.
  • Use of a sunscreen with SPF of 20 to 30 offers substantial protection from sunburn and prevents tanning. High SPF sunscreens protect from burning for longer periods of time than do sunscreens with lower a SPF. Talk with your older child or teenager about using sunscreen and why it’s important. Set a good example for them by using sunscreen yourself.
  • Teach your teenager to avoid tanning beds and salons. Most tanning beds and salons use ultraviolet-A bulbs. Research has shown that UVA rays may contribute to premature aging of the skin and skin cancer.
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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Ready-Set-Go-Spring!

I absolutely love this time of year—seeing the trees bud; watching the grass turn green; enjoying the extended daylight; and the happier mood in people.  For me, it means I can switch from the treadmill (lovingly coined the ‘dreadmill’ by many of my runner friends) to outdoor running, which is always a welcomed change!

Winter is tough in Wisconsin between the cold, snow and dark and it’s easy to get into a funk that is hard to break away from. It’s harder to exercise, and we tend to gravitate to the ‘comfort’ food items that are so delicious, but maybe on the ‘not so healthy’ side of the spectrum.  With summer fast-approaching, now is the time to break out of the winter rut and get back on track.


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News

Fort HealthCare welcomes new Family Nurse Practitioner

Fort HealthCare is proud to welcome Family Nurse Practitioner, Kaitlin Ziemke to our team. She is the newest member at our Johnson Creek and Jefferson Clinics and accepting new patients.

Kaitlin’s road to becoming a provider was a very personal one.  After graduating with a Bachelor’s of Nursing from University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee (UWM) two of her Grandparents feel ill.  She states, “I wanted a deeper understanding of my grandparents’ illnesses and treatment options so I could make sure they were getting the best care possible.” Kaitlin completed her Doctorate of Nursing Practice, also at UWM, and this was her way of making sure she could pay it forward for the great care her grandparents received.


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Fort HealthCare Foundation Celebration Event

The Fort Memorial Hospital Foundation held its first Celebration Event on Thursday, April 16 at the Fort Atkinson Club. 115 guests learned about the impact of their charitable donations to Fort HealthCare’s mission at the festive event.

Entering the Fort Atkinson Club on the main level, guests were greeted by members of the event committee, Rosemary Hable, Marie Nelson and Carol Ward Knox. They were also greeted by the aromas of Chef Colleen Miller’s cuisine, the beautiful decorations provided by Humphrey Floral & Gifts, and the light jazz of the Mike Knauf Duo.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
May 4 Movin' and Losin'
May 6 Basic Life Support (BLS)
May 7 Basic Tai Chi
May 7 Women Who CARE Program & Event
May 7 Continuing Tai Chi
May 7 Corrections Tai Chi
May 12 Weight Loss Seminar
May 12 Weight-Loss Surgery Seminar
May 14 Brother, Sister, Sibling-to-be
May 16 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED, First Aid
May 18 Critical Care Classes
May 19 Healthy-Steps
May 20 AHA Heartsaver Family and Friends
May 20 Pediatric Emergency Assessment Recognition and Stabilization(PEARS)
May 20 Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS)
May 26 Basic Life Support (BLS)
May 27 Step Aerobics
May 27 Body Blast
May 27 Skinny Arms
May 27 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED
May 27 AHA ACLS Renewal Course
May 27 AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS)
May 28 Glutes and Abs
May 28 Lower Body Sculpt
May 28 Glutes & Abs
May 28 Boot Camp
May 28 Cardio Kickboxing
May 29 Cardio Kickboxing Express
May 29 Skinny Arms Express
May 30 Red Cross Babysitting
Recipes

Broiled Trout with Almonds

Although rainbow trout is native to a narrow band along the West Coast of the United States, cultivation in ponds dates back more than 100 years. Today, farmers across the country raise this sweet, slightly nutty-tasting fish. Most market-ready trout comes through Idaho, where farmers send live fish to processing plants for filleting.



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Although rainbow trout is native to a narrow band along the West Coast of the United States, cultivation in ponds dates back more than 100 years. Today, farmers across the country raise this sweet, slightly nutty-tasting fish. Most market-ready trout comes through Idaho, where farmers send live fish to processing plants for filleting.

Ingredients

2 rainbow trout, butterfly filleted

1 teaspoon butter or margarine

2 tablespoons almonds, sliced

Lemon pepper (use an unsalted blend, about 1/2 teaspoon total)

Lemon wedges

Directions

Heat broiler to high. Rinse trout and pat dry. Open fish and place skin-side-down on a foil-lined broiler pan. Dot with butter or margarine and sprinkle with almonds and lemon pepper. Broil about five minutes or until fish is opaque and flakes easily with a fork. Serve immediately with lemon wedges.

Serves two 

Each serving contains about 309 calories, 3 g carbohydrates, 36 g protein, 16 g fat, 93 mg sodium, and 0 g fiber.

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