Health365 eNews
September 2014 • Volume 4, Issue 9

Early Detection is the Best Protection

Prostate cancer, besides skin cancer, it is the top cancer diagnosis for men. While it can be a very aggressive type of cancer, it often doesn’t appear in men they’ve reached at least 50 years of age. It is important that men start rec


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Prostate cancer, besides skin cancer, it is the top cancer diagnosis for men. While it can be a very aggressive type of cancer, it often doesn’t appear in men they’ve reached at least 50 years of age. It is important that men start receiving regular screenings at age 40 to prevent or stop the progression of prostate cancer later in life.

A Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is one of the tests that can be performed by a family physician or urologist to help detect any benign or cancerous conditions.

What is PSA testing?

  • PSA is a protein that is made in the cells of the prostate gland that can help detect a disease.
  • The simple test specifically measures the amount of PSA in the blood.
  • A doctor takes a sample of the blood and it is then measured in the lab. (It is normal for men to have a low level of PSA in their blood. Once the level increases, it could be a sign of prostate cancer or other benign conditions, meaning it will not destroy or invade any cells or tissues.)

Recently, there has been a lot of attention regarding PSA testing and whether or not it is an accurate way to detect prostate cancer.  For instance, the PSA test can tell a doctor whether a patient’s PSA level is normal or too high, but it cannot tell if someone has cancer or if their condition is benign. Some people believe that this can cause high levels of anxiety for people diagnosed with higher levels of PSA.  Also, results may be misleading; a person may show a normal level of PSA in the blood when prostate cancer is actually present. Since prostate cancer is a slow growing cancer, it is possible for false-negatives to occur.

Because of all of the factors involved in testing for prostate cancer, it is still important to continue regular prostate screenings, including PSA testing for men over the age of 40. If you are age 40 or older, it is important to talk to your doctor or a urologist about screening.

FREE Prostate Cancer Screening

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month and we are offering FREE prostate cancer screenings on Saturday, September 22. Appointments are available between 7:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. at Fort HealthCare Urology Associates, 520 Handeyside Lane, Suite 2, Fort Atkinson. Free screening includes a PSA test, a digital rectal exam and written information about prostate cancer, valued at $140. Appointments are REQUIRED and can be made by calling Fort HealthCare’s Community Health & Wellness department at (920) 568-5244.

Fort HealthCare Urology Associates offer diagnosis and treatment for men and women with conditions involving the bladder and kidneys, and provides the best possible outcomes for men with prostate or genital issues. Fort HealthCare Urology Associates has offices in Fort Atkinson and Whitewater, and in Johnson Creek as of October 1. Visit FortHealthCare.com/Urology to learn more, or call (920) 563-7744 to make an appointment.

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Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Living

You’ve been told that you have celiac disease. This means that you are sensitive to a protein called gluten. Gluten is found in certain grains. When you ingest gluten, your immune system causes harm to your intestines. The treatment for celiac disease is to avoid foods and products that contain gluten. You will need to do this for the rest of your life. Avoid the temptation to “cheat.” Even a small amount of gluten can cause symptoms to return. And it can do harm to your body.


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You’ve been told that you have celiac disease. This means that you are sensitive to a protein called gluten. Gluten is found in certain grains. When you ingest gluten, your immune system causes harm to your intestines. The treatment for celiac disease is to avoid foods and products that contain gluten. You will need to do this for the rest of your life. Avoid the temptation to “cheat.” Even a small amount of gluten can cause symptoms to return. And it can do harm to your body.

Always Read Labels!

Many foods may contain gluten, even if you think they don’t. Get into the habit of reading ingredient labels before you eat.

Choosing Foods

The most common source of gluten is wheat flour (this includes “white” flour). Wheat flour is used to make many baked goods, including breads, pastas, cereals, pastries, and pizza dough. But gluten is found in many foods that you might not think would have it. You will need to read food labels to look for gluten in everything you eat. But your diet does not need to be boring. Many foods are naturally gluten-free. And many foods commonly made with wheat flour now come in gluten-free forms. But keep in mind that if something is labeled “wheat-free” it may not be also gluten-free.

Foods to Avoid

  • Bread, cereals, pasta, pastries, couscous, or pizza dough made with wheat flour (this includes white flour and semolina)
  • Foods containing rye, barley (including malt), spelt, kamut, or bulgur
  • Processed meats
  • Some dairy products with additives
  • Many sauces, gravies, dressings, and condiments
  • Some granola bars and energy bars
  • Some beers and spirits
  • Some soups
  • Foods that are fried or breaded
  • Many packaged foods
  • Oats (check with your healthcare provider)
  • Communion wafers

Foods You Can Eat

  • Bread, cereals, pasta, pastries, or pizza dough made with rice flour, almond flour, beans, potatoes, or other substitutes
  • Foods containing corn, rice, amaranth, buckwheat, millet, quinoa, or tapioca
  • Fresh meats and seafood (beef, chicken, turkey, lamb, pork, fish, shellfish)
  • Many plain dairy products
  • Vinegar, oils, and gluten-free substitutes
  • Gluten-free granola bars and energy bars
  • Wine, and gluten-free beers and spirits
  • Gluten-free soups
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Beans
  • Tofu

Avoiding Accidental Exposure to Gluten

Staying gluten-free means always being aware. Even if you are very careful, mistakes can happen. Your food can’t come into contact with gluten. Your meals must be made with utensils that have not touched foods that contain gluten. Shared knives, cutting boards, toasters, and storage containers are risks for gluten exposure. Shared condiments may have crumbs that contain gluten. At restaurants, parties, and other places where you eat food prepared by others, ask how the food was made. Gluten can also be found in some non-food items. Some medications contain gluten. So do some vitamin supplements. Ask your pharmacist before taking a medication or supplement. Also, some shampoos, lotions, makeup, glues, soaps, and other products contain gluten. It can be possible to ingest some gluten when using these projects. This is called cross-contamination. For example, this can happen if you use a lotion that has gluten and then touch food you eat. Also note that Play-Doh and similar products have gluten. Any adult or child with celiac disease should wash their hands after handling these.

Coping with Gluten-Free Living

Living gluten-free can be hard. While there are many gluten-free foods now that you can buy, it is still a big change for many people. You may be upset that you can’t eat your favorite foods. You may be upset that you can’t eat freely at restaurants, parties, or over the holidays. Household members may be upset by the strict controls over food. If you face problems like these, think about joining a celiac disease support group. Support groups offer tips on how to make a gluten-free lifestyle easier on you and the people you live with. You can find ways to involve the people in your household. There are many ways to make gluten-free group meals. Bring safe foods that you enjoy to parties and school or work events. This can help you avoid the urge to grab something you shouldn’t eat.

Following Up with Your Healthcare Provider

You should see your healthcare provider at least once a year for a celiac checkup. A simple blood test can show if your celiac disease is under control. If you are having symptoms, your healthcare provider can help you find sources of gluten you may have missed. If you need help, contact Fort HealthCare’s Nutrition Services Department. Our Registered Dieticians (RD) can teach you what foods and other products have gluten and how to avoid them.

How much do you know about Celiac Disease? Take our interactive quiz!

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What To Do When Allergies are Too Much

An ear, nose, and throat specialist (ENT) is a physician trained in the medical and surgical treatment of the ears, nose, throat and related structures of the head and neck. ENTs have special expertise in managing diseases, conditions, disorders and infections of the ears, nose and nasal passage, sinuses, voice box, mouth and throat, as well as structures of the neck and face.


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An ear, nose, and throat specialist (ENT) is a physician trained in the medical and surgical treatment of the ears, nose, throat and related structures of the head and neck. ENTs have special expertise in managing diseases, conditions, disorders and infections of the ears, nose and nasal passage, sinuses, voice box, mouth and throat, as well as structures of the neck and face.

ENTs can also provide diagnosis and treatment for respiratory allergies, including grasses, trees, weeds, molds, cats and dogs. Allergies are among the most common health problems, with more than 50 million people afflicted by allergy-related conditions each year. ENTs also provide immunotherapy for allergies.

What is immunotherapy?

Immunotherapy is the only specific treatment for allergy; all other treatments are directed at relieving allergy symptoms rather than working on a more permanent solution as immunotherapy does. There is no true “cure” for allergies, but immunotherapy can have a very beneficial effect on the health of an allergic person.

Immunotherapy is often used in addition to environmental controls and allergy medications to eliminate or reduce symptoms. It is most effective for those allergies caused by substances that are inhaled, such as pollens, mold spores, house dust, and animal dander.

Immunotherapy is an individually-tailored program designed to combat specific allergies. It involves gradually giving increased doses of the allergen (substance you are allergic to). As a result, the immune system is stimulated to react to the allergen, and over time, you become less sensitive to it. This treatment reduces the symptoms experienced when coming into contact with the allergen in the future. This kind of therapy needs to be monitored and performed by physicians specially-trained in allergy treatment.

When to see an ENT allergy specialist

An otolaryngologist (ENT) who specializes in allergy has special training to identify allergy triggers, and help people treat or prevent their problems. Allergy sufferers may become used to frequent symptoms such as sneezing, nasal congestion, headaches or wheezing. Often, allergy symptoms can also make asthma worse.

Allergies can develop at any age, or recur after many years of remission. It is not uncommon for allergies to gradually develop over time. With the help of an ENT, allergy symptoms can usually be prevented or controlled, resulting in a major improvement in quality of life.

A family doctor can recommend the best course of treatment for many allergic conditions or may refer you to see an ENT specialist. If you experience hay fever or other allergy symptoms for several months out of the year, and antihistamines and over-the-counter medications don’t control your allergy symptoms or create unacceptable side effects, then it may be time to visit a Fort HealthCare Ear, Nose & Throat specialist near you. Visit FortHealthCare.com/ENT for more information.

Drs. David Rowe, Michael Anderson and William Hofmann are otolaryngologists (ENTs) with Fort HealthCare Ear, Nose & Throat Specialists. In addition to allergy treatment, they also provide care for:

  • Snoring
  • Lumps in the throat
  • State-of-the-art sinus surgery
  • Balloon sinuplasty surgery
  • Surgical hearing evaluations
  • Conductive hearing loss
  • Ear drum perforation treatments
  • Hearing Loss
  • Techniques for decreased pain post tonsillectomy

Visit FortHealthCare.com/ENT to learn more about our providers and services.

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Talk To Your Kids About Drugs, Alcohol and Tobacco

The new school year brings new experiences for children; new teachers, new friends and new situations. Talking with your child about drugs, alcohol, and tobacco is tough. But you can’t afford to ignore these topics. Children learn about these substances and feel pressure to use them at a very young age.


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The new school year brings new experiences for children; new teachers, new friends and new situations. Talking with your child about drugs, alcohol, and tobacco is tough. But you can’t afford to ignore these topics. Children learn about these substances and feel pressure to use them at a very young age.

If you have children, it’s hard not to worry. But don’t panic – and don’t ignore the subject. Instead, if your child is older than 5 or anytime your child starts asking, start talking with him or her about drugs, alcohol, and tobacco. Here are some guidelines on how to start talking and how to help your kids be substance-free.

Start early

Experts in the area of adolescent drug treatment suggest that you start talking about drinking, smoking, and using drugs when your child is between ages 5 and 7, and that you keep the dialogue going.

When possible, raise the subject of substance use in context. For example, if family members drink wine with dinner, talk about why they do and what it means to drink responsibly. Or, if your younger child is watching TV and a beer commercial comes on, discuss the fact that although the people in the commercial appear to be having a good time, drinking too much alcohol can cause you to act silly, irresponsibly, and violently. It can also cause you to hurt yourself or others. Talking with your child at a young age is especially important if family members have alcohol or drug problems, because children with a family history of substance abuse are more likely to become substance abusers.

As your child gets older, continue to talk regularly about drugs, alcohol, and tobacco, but in a more adult manner. Make your views on the subject clear and repeat them often. If you don’t approve of smoking or drinking, be sure your child knows this. Your child needs to understand that under no circumstances is drug use acceptable and that there are no safe street drugs.

Know the facts

To educate your child, become informed. Learn about the four drugs that children usually try first: alcohol, marijuana, nicotine (cigarettes and chewing tobacco), and inhalants (glue, paint, hair spray, and correction fluid). The more you know about drugs, alcohol, and tobacco, the clearer you will be when you tell your child why he or she should not drink alcohol or use tobacco or drugs.

You’ll be more convincing if you can state the following facts:

  • Getting drunk affects judgment. It can make people take dangerous risks that they would not take if they were sober. For younger children, warnings may include riding in cars with a drunk driver (including, unfortunately, parents) or being around violent drunks. For preteens and teenagers, warnings about loss of judgment might include riding with a drunk driver or driving while drunk; engaging in sex against their will or before they are ready; or engaging in unprotected sex at any time, which could cause infection with a sexually transmitted disease, including HIV. Loss of inhibition may introduce them to drugs or the dangerous practice of sharing needles. And finally, teen girls may get assaulted while they are drunk, their boyfriends are drunk, or both are drunk.
  • Marijuana causes short-term memory loss. Continued use during the school years impairs scholastic function and will directly affect performance, grades, and social functioning. It is also illegal; if a child is caught, there will be repercussions for the child and the parent(s).
  • Marijuana alternatives such as “spice” are no safer, in fact, may be more risky than marijuana. The fact they may be readily available, even commercially and fraudulently sold as incense, does not mean that they are safe or legal.
  • “Bath salts” (not to be confused with bathing soaps or perfumes). These can contain stimulants or other psychoactive drugs in small amounts. Even though they may also be readily available, even commercially, they are not legal or safe to use.
  • Nicotine is addictive, and smoking is dangerous to your health. It also makes your clothes, breath, and hair smell bad, and it is expensive. These immediate consequences can be more convincing to kids than the threat of health problems years from now. It doesn’t hurt, however, to remind them that smoking causes lung cancer, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, renal cancer, bladder cancer, mouth and throat cancer, and increased risk for heart attack. It is responsible for nearly 500,000 premature deaths each year in the U.S.
  • Using an inhalant is extremely dangerous and can kill you, even the first time you use one by causing suffocation or heart irregularities. The solvents that are typically inhaled damage the liver and other organs. Some substances, such as toluene, can increase the risk for leukemia. Use can cause permanent brain damage.
  • When children or teens drink and use drugs, it effects their brains differently than when adults use. This is because the brain is more vulnerable during childhood and adolescence to changes and damage caused by alcohol and drugs.

The nuts and bolts

You may get a variety of responses when you bring up substance abuse with preteens or teens. If your preteen or teen is already involved in these activities, you may get responses such as: “You’re making a big deal out of this.” “I can quit when I’m older.” “You did it when you were a kid.” It’s important that you stay calm, be nonjudgmental and state the facts. Making threats or losing your temper will not work in the long run. Here’s what will work:

  • Make your point. Be clear about your views on drug, alcohol, and tobacco use. State your position calmly and clearly. For instance: “No amount of smoking, drinking, or drug use is OK with me.” If you currently smoke, drink, or use drugs, or if you have in the past, be honest about it. Tell your teen why you don’t want him or her to make the same mistakes you did.
  • Give guidance. Preteens and teens sometimes use drugs, alcohol, or tobacco to cope with strong emotions or feelings. Talk with your teen about other ways that he or she can manage emotional pain, stress, or loneliness.
  • Listen. Pay attention to what your child says. Do your best not to get defensive. Talk about your child’s opinions without judging or accusing him or her. For example, if your child says smoking makes him cool, ask him to define what makes one person cooler than another.
  • Explain the message. Talk with your teen about the messages in cigarette and alcohol advertising. Explain how companies use marketing to sell their products; nobody likes to be tricked or manipulated.
  • Role-play. A newspaper story about a car accident caused by drinking or about a drug incident at your child’s school can give you a good chance to talk. Ask your teen questions, such as, “What would you say if someone offered you drugs?” Then help him or her come up with confident, effective answers.
  • Be open. Make a written contract with your teen. Include a section stating that you will pick up your teen, no questions asked, if he or she is drunk or high or is offered a ride by someone who is. Let your teen know that although you do not approve of drug use, you don’t want him or her to take dangerous risks.

By being supportive and having open communication with your children, you can encourage them to turn to you instead of drugs, alcohol, or smoking. As a parent, this is one of most important gifts you can give your children.

How to be supportive

The more involved you are in your teen’s life the less likely he or she is to drink, smoke, or use drugs. Here are some ways to be supportive:

  • Build your teen’s self-esteem. During adolescence the body changes, emotions run high, and moods swing. It can be a confusing time for both you and your teen. Listen to your teen, and be careful not to judge. Let your teen know that his or her feelings are important. This helps build self-esteem. If your teen has the confidence, assertiveness, and strength to handle tough times, he or she will be less likely to try drugs, alcohol, and tobacco to feel better or to please friends.
  • Know how much time your teen spends unsupervised. Studies show that having a lot of unsupervised time can make a teen more likely to try drugs. Help your teen choose healthy leisure activities.
  • Discourage your teen from having friends that use drugs, alcohol, or tobacco. Peer pressure is a powerful influence on teens.
  • Be a role model. If you smoke or use alcohol or drugs, chances are your teen will, too. If you smoke or have a problem with alcohol or drugs, get help. Call a local substance abuse treatment center or an organization, such as Alcoholics Anonymous or Nicotine Anonymous. Let your teen see your efforts to kick a substance abuse habit. Or, ask a relative or friend who is trying to quit smoking, drinking or using drugs to talk with your teen about how strong the addiction is.
  • Ask for help. Raising children is complicated, and you may need help. Consider taking a parenting class or going to a family counselor. Hospitals and community centers often offer such classes. Your teen’s health care provider can help you find one.

Watch for signs of substance abuse. Here are several common ones:

  • Change of friends
  • Drop in grades
  • Lack of motivation
  • Secretiveness or moodiness
  • Missing nail polish remover, correction fluid, or paint (common inhalants) from around your house
  • Using air freshener, incense, or breath freshener to cover the smell of cigarettes or marijuana
  • Violence or destructiveness

If you notice any of these signs of substance abuse, talk with your teen and your teen’s health care provider or a counselor. Take the problem seriously, and get help. Fort HealthCare Behavioral Health Center focuses on the destructiveness of addiction in children and adults. Depending on your situation and needs, Fort HealthCare Behavioral Health Center can provide individual, family or group counseling to help your loved ones overcome both physical and emotional problems.

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Add More Fruits & Vegetables Into Your Daily Diet!

Sure, an apple a day can keep the doctor away. But did you know that eating at least 1½ cups of fruit and two cups of vegetables daily can also reduce your risk for cancer, heart disease, and stroke? According to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, consuming 1½ to two cups of fruits and two to four cups of vegetables is optimal. The amount depends on the number of calories per day recommended for your healthy weight.


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Sure, an apple a day can keep the doctor away. But did you know that eating at least 1½ cups of fruit and two cups of vegetables daily can also reduce your risk for cancer, heart disease, and stroke? According to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, consuming 1½ to two cups of fruits and two to four cups of vegetables is optimal. The amount depends on the number of calories per day recommended for your healthy weight.

Start boosting your daily consumption of fruits and vegetables with a few easy eating tips from the Produce for Better Health Foundation.

Anytime

  • Put fruit and vegetables at the top of your shopping list.
  • Buy many kinds of fruits and vegetables when you shop, so you have plenty of choices and you don’t run out. Buy fresh, frozen, dried, and canned.
  • After shopping, use soft fruits and vegetables such as bananas, peaches, and tomatoes first, because they go bad easily. Save hardier varieties such as apples and acorn squash or frozen and canned products for later in the week.
  • Increase portions when you serve vegetables and fruits.
  • Keep a bowl of fruit on the kitchen table or counter.
  • Keep packs of applesauce, raisins, or other dried fruit in your car or office.
  • Keep a bowl of cut up vegetables on the top shelf of the refrigerator.
  • Don’t smother vegetables or fruits in high-calorie, high-fat sauces, or glazes.
  • Avoid overcooking or boiling vegetables, because this may reduce their nutrient content. Certain nutrients end up in the cooking water, which is usually discarded.

Breakfast

  • Start your day with a piece of fruit.
  • Add chopped fruit to your breakfast cereal. Try sliced bananas, apples, or dried fruit, such as raisins or apricots.
  • Top toast with mashed strawberries or bananas.
  • Add sautéed peppers, onions, mushrooms, and asparagus to an omelet.
  • Make a fresh-fruit smoothie for a fruit-packed breakfast on the run.

Lunch

  • Put at least one salad vegetable in your sandwich. Try tomato, lettuce, cucumber, grated carrots, or avocado.
  • Eat a piece of fruit for dessert. When fresh fruits aren’t in season, choose canned fruit packed in juice or dried fruit, such as apples and apricots.
  • Spoon some fresh salsa over a ham or chicken sandwich before adding the top slice of bread.
  • Choose vegetable toppings for pizza.
  • Add fruits and veggies to prepared salads. For example, add grapes, raisins, or apple slices to chicken salad; chopped onions, green peppers and carrots, to tuna salad.
  • Add berries or sliced bananas to plain low-fat yogurt for a sweet treat.
  • Snack on raw veggies dipped in salsa.

Dinner

  • Have one or two vegetables besides potatoes with your dinner. A simple way to add vegetables is to buy frozen packaged combinations of them: succotash or peas and carrots, for instance.
  • Add vegetables to soups, sauces, and casseroles. For example, grate carrot and zucchini into spaghetti sauce.
  • Add onions, green peppers, and diced tomatoes to a bean burrito or quesadilla.
  • Top fat-free ice cream, ice milk, or sherbet with sliced bananas, strawberries, raspberries, or blueberries.

September is MORE Fruits and Vegetables Month! Test your knowledge on the nutritional benefits of fruit and vegetables here!

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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Heat and the athlete

Late summer brings the kids back-to-school along with the heat and humidity we all dread. I look forward to this time of year because I love football! As an athletic trainer, however, I see the dangerous effects this heat can have on young athletes; this is especially true when combined with dehydration.


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News

Live Well Programming Helps Underserved Population Know Their Numbers

Fort HealthCare recognizes that access to essential primary care services is sometimes unavailable to those who are under-insured. In a continuing effort to increase access to care, the organization is introducing a new program that provides these individuals with baseline lab measurements, biometrics like waist circumference and body mass index, and a general health risk assessment that addresses chronic diseases and lifestyle choices. The program also provides access to tools and information needed to make necessary lifestyle changes. It is specifically targeted to benefit those with little or no insurance, and is funded through Tomorrow’s Hope.


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Steel Away Café Offering Grab 'n Go and Breakfast Options

Fort HealthCare’s Steel Away Cafe is pleased to announce that healthy and affordable dining choices are available 12 hours per day, including breakfast. Led by executive chef, Colleen Miller, the cafe is a prime dining option for staff of and visitors to Fort Memorial Hospital and has been growing in popularity with community members, as well.


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Seeking Patient Satisfaction Information Through Surveys

Patients of Fort HealthCare clinics and Fort Memorial Hospital are given the opportunity to share their experiences and help improve the quality of patient care through randomly assigned patient satisfaction surveys. Managers rely upon returned surveys to review provide insights into customer service and make improvements as indicated by respondents. Feedback provided by patients on these surveys is critical to creating the best possible patient experience.


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Fort Memorial Hospital to Participate in National Nursing Quality Program

Nursing administration at Fort Memorial Hospital was recently notified that the hospital’s application for participation in the Wisconsin Hospital Association’s Transforming Care at the Bedside Project has been accepted and approved. Fort Memorial Hospital will join more than two dozen hospitals in Wisconsin selected to participate in the Aligning Forces for Quality Transforming Care at the Bedside project.


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Fort HealthCare Welcomes Pediatrician Prerna Sinha, MD

Fort HealthCare and Fort Medical Group are pleased to welcome pediatrician, Prerna Sinha, MD, to the Fort HealthCare Internal Medicine and Pediatrics clinic in Fort Atkinson. She joins Julia Dewey, MD, Katherine Lemon, MD, Donald Williams, MD, and nurse practitioner, Heidi Jennrich, as they care for patients in the area.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
January 1 Weight Watchers Open House
January 1 AHA BLS Renewal Course
January 1 Having Healthy Babies
January 1 AHA BLS Renewal Course
January 1 Rusty Hinges
January 1 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED
January 1 Brother, Sister: Sibling-to-Be
January 1 AHA Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
January 1 On My Own at Home
January 1 Prenatal and Infant Nutrition
January 1 Stepping On
January 1 AHA BLS Renewal Course
January 1 Stepping On
January 1 Happiest Baby on the Block
January 1 Free Prostate Screening
January 1 AHA BLS Recognition Course
January 1 AHA Heartsaver Family & Friends CPR
January 1 Red Cross Babysitting
January 1 Walk the Labyrinth
January 1 Free Health Screening
January 1 AHA Heart Walk
Recipes

Curried Chicken Salad with Apples and Raisins

Submitted by Lisa Ashwill, Clinical Dietitian

Enjoy this fruit-studded chicken salad with whole-grain crackers, or spread it on whole wheat bread for a sandwich.

Yield: 2 servings (serving size: about 1 cup)



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Submitted by Lisa Ashwill, Clinical Dietitian

Enjoy this fruit-studded chicken salad with whole-grain crackers, or spread it on whole wheat bread for a sandwich.

Yield: 2 servings (serving size: about 1 cup)

Ingredients
1/4 cup low-fat mayonnaise
1 teaspoon curry powder
2 teaspoons water
1 cup chopped skinless, boneless Grilled Lemon-Herb Chicken (about 4 ounces)
3/4 cup chopped Braeburn apple (about 1 small)
1/3 cup diced celery
3 tablespoons raisins
1/8 teaspoon salt

Preparation
Combine mayonnaise, curry powder, and water in a medium bowl, stirring with a whisk until well blended. Add the Grilled Lemon-Herb Chicken, chopped apple, celery, raisins, and salt; stir mixture well to combine. Cover and chill.

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