Health365 eNews
September 2014 • Volume 5, Issue 6

Farm Fresh—benefits of shopping at your local farmers market

Natural, fresh vegetables are an important component of a healthy diet, and herbs are also a great way to add flavor to food without adding extra calories or salt. While you may be tempted to pick up some fresh—or so you think—fruit and ve


Read more

Natural, fresh vegetables are an important component of a healthy diet, and herbs are also a great way to add flavor to food without adding extra calories or salt. While you may be tempted to pick up some fresh—or so you think—fruit and veggies on your next trip to the grocery store, consider these 8 reasons to shop at your local farmers’ market instead:

  1. Shopping at farmers’ markets is one of the best sources of nutrient-rich food. Vegetables and fruit that are grown locally and picked when perfectly ripened have superior, taste, texture and aroma as well as having higher nutritional value.
  2. When produce is grown and purchased locally, the money remains in the community and stimulates the local economy.
  3. Farmers’ markets put more money in the farmers’ pockets. Commercial farmers get only about twenty-five cents of every dollar’s worth of produce sold in supermarkets. At the farmers’ market, they get the whole dollar.
  4. You can meet the farmers who grow your food, ask when it was picked, how it was grown, and ways to prepare it.
  5. Before reaching your table, the average food item in the United States will travel 1,300 miles. And this is when taking into account only US grown products! Distances can be many times that for produce imported from Mexico, Asia, South America, and other places. Eliminating that travel time saves fuel and resources spent on long distance shipping.
  6. Buying locally grown produce encourages regional farming. If farming were more widespread, we could reduce our overdependence on a handful of growing regions that may not be able to produce high yields indefinitely.
  7. You’ll find better varieties of fruits and vegetables because they are bred for flavor, not uniform, size, or ability to travel. Growing a larger number of varieties is ecologically smart too, because it reduces crops’ vulnerability to disease.
  8. Working farms preserve open spaces without using tax dollars.
  9. Fort HealthCare has partnered with local food producers to provide fresh produce at their Mini-Farmers Market every Wednesday from 2:30 – 5 p.m. in the Fort Memorial Hospital. Additionally, local communities (Fort Atkinson, Jefferson, Lake Mills, Watertown, Janesville, Johnson Creek, Cambridge and Whitewater) also offer farmers throughout the week during the summer months.

Fort HealthCare is also proud to be a sponsor of the Farmers’ Markets in Cambridge, Fort Atkinson, Jefferson and Lake Mills.

Hide

Maintain, Don’t Gain—End the Yo-Yo Cycle

Last summer you reached your goal weight and celebrated by buying that dress you have had your eye on. Then, your job got stressful, you had trouble finding the time and motivation to work out, and the holidays brought an endless buffet of food…


Read more

Last summer you reached your goal weight and celebrated by buying that dress you have had your eye on. Then, your job got stressful, you had trouble finding the time and motivation to work out, and the holidays brought an endless buffet of food. After putting it off long enough, you stepped on the scale and realized there is no way you were going to fit into your swimsuit…so you sign up for Fort HealthCare’s Slimdown Challenge with a few friends and shed over 10% of your body weight. But now, will you keep it off? Yo-yo dieting—or weight cycling, as experts call it—seems to be a common occurrence for many Americans. While an abundance of supplements, packaged food that promote weight loss and books and magazines fuel a multi-billion-dollar-a-year industry, our efforts don’t seem to stick.

Most people will regain almost all of what they lose, according to various studies, which is why dieters continue to try new plans. This has given Americans the mentality that a diet is something to go on and then get off as quickly as they started, but lasting weight loss requires long-term lifestyle changes. Yo-yo dieting affects more than just your waistline: constant weight fluctuations can affect certain levels of hormones and confidence and self-esteem levels can also take a hit, which is why so many are ready to lose the unwanted weight and keep it off for good. Fort HealthCare’s 2013 Slimdown Challenge helped 1,050 participants lose over 6,400 pounds in 12 weeks, but the true challenge lies ahead. Fort HealthCare is challenging you to keep it off; these success secrets can help you balance the scale for good:

  • Soothe without food. Stress eating can quickly turn into a binge; we don’t register what we are munching on, because it is being scarfed down so fast! Make a list of calming strategies that don’t involve reaching for the bag of chips. When you feel overwhelmed, pick out something from the list that you can do to calm yourself for the next 5-10 minutes. This can help distract you long enough for your stress levels to come down.
  • Change your goals. There will always be a wedding, reunion or vacation to slim down for. Crash dieting is all about dropping pounds quickly, but what will keep you from splurging on dessert every night after that big event has come and gone? Instead of keeping the pounds off long enough to impress your former high school classmates, try to think of the rewarding long-term achievements of health and fitness. Try setting a fitness-related goal, like training for a race or getting in shape for your family hiking trip (that you’re secretly dreading). Setting new goals each time you complete one can help you stay on track.
  • Ease up. Instead of obsessing about every piece of food entering your mouth or every minute of exercise completed, try to look at the big picture. Focus on how eating right and exercise make you feel; take the time to notice the positive effects of each of your healthy behaviors, and compare them to your prior behaviors.
  • Make it known. Social-networking sites are a good way to ditch the pen-and-paper meal tracker and upgrade to a viral support system. There are many sites to track your calorie intake online that are equipped with the most up-to-date nutrition information on all of your favorite foods and restaurants. Many feel more accountable when they know others can see what they are eating, and the online support groups can help you stay on track.
  • Pump it up. Instead of letting your motivation to exercise slowly dwindle, kick it up a notch! Overcoming more challenging fitness obstacles can boost your confidence and help you stay on track after those inevitable setbacks.
  • Fuel yourself with others’ success. While sticking to a diet can be easier if you’re doing it with someone, teaming up with someone who has already lost their unwanted weight and kept it off can be even more useful. A good mentor can empathize, help you navigate potential pitfalls and remind you of the endless benefits of healthy living.
Hide

Man Up during Men’s Health Month

I’d rather be fishing. I’d rather be golfing. I’d rather be running. I’d rather be playing with my kids.

Let’s face it – there are many things men would rather be doing than going to the doctor for a checkup. But taking time to assess your overall health with a physician each year is important. It could even save your life so you can keep doing all the activities you enjoy.


Read more

I’d rather be fishing. I’d rather be golfing. I’d rather be running. I’d rather be playing with my kids.

Let’s face it – there are many things men would rather be doing than going to the doctor for a checkup. But taking time to assess your overall health with a physician each year is important. It could even save your life so you can keep doing all the activities you enjoy.

June is Men’s Health Month; if you’re a man – or a woman who is concerned about the health of your husband, father, grandfather, son or other man in your life – you’ll want to be aware of these recommended checkups, screenings and immunizations for men. Keep in mind that these are general guidelines and you should check with your doctor for a schedule that’s right for you.

  • Physical exam. A once-a-year exam by a primary care physician may include an assessment of height, weight, blood pressure, skin cancer risk, eating and exercise habits, and emotional well-being. The doctor will ask about your family health history and answer any questions you have about sleep/snoring, sexual health or other health concerns.
  • Immunizations. Men should get a flu shot every year and a tetanus-diphtheria and pertussis (Tdap) or tetanus-diphtheria (Td) booster every 10 years. Your doctor may recommend other vaccines depending on your age and health history.
  • Eye exam. If you have problems with vision, you should schedule an eye exam every two years.
  • Dental exam. Don’t forget to visit the dentist every year for an exam and cleaning.
  • Cholesterol screening. Most men should be checked every five years. You may need to be monitored more closely if you have high cholesterol or risk factors for heart disease or diabetes.
  • Diabetes screening. If you are age 45 or older and overweight, or if you have other risk factors, your doctor may recommend that you be tested for diabetes.
  • Colon cancer screening. Starting at age 50, your doctor may recommend a colonoscopy or other screening test for colon cancer.
  • Prostate cancer screening. Men age 50 and older may benefit from prostate cancer screening. African-American men and those with a family history of prostate cancer may begin screening earlier, at age 45.
  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening. If you are age 65 to 75, an ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm could save your life. This test is especially important for men who have ever smoked cigarettes.
  • Hearing test. Your doctor may screen for hearing loss and suggest ways to protect the hearing you have, as well as recommend hearing-aid devices if needed. Audiologist Lori Fish, Au. D., offers FREE screenings year round for anyone concerned with their hearing. Call (920) 563-6667 to schedule a screening today!

    Time to Man Up for Screening Tests?
    These are general guidelines and are not intended as medical advice. Talk to your doctor about screening tests that may be right for you.

      20s 30s 40s 50s 60+
    Blood pressure screening X X X X X
    Cholesterol test X X X X X
    Diabetes screening (if overweight)     X X X
    Colon cancer screening       X X
    Prostate cancer screening       X X
    Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening         X

    Need a Doctor?
    If you’re a guy who never gets sick and hasn’t set foot in a doctor’s office for a few years, it’s probably time for a checkup. A Fort HealthCare primary care physician can team up with you to take care of your health now and going forward. Need help finding a doctor? Check out our online provider directory at www.FortHealthCare.com.

Hide

8 Reasons to Choose Tap vs. Bottled

Water is an essential nutrient and our bodies cannot function without it. Although it seems simple, finding the right water to drink can be challenging. Tap vs. bottled water? Which is safer and healthier? Which is better for the environment? What about taste, price and convenience? Choosing the right water can be a complicated and frustrating dilemma; however, the following reasons may help you recognize and appreciate the benefits of choosing tap water.


Read more

Water is an essential nutrient and our bodies cannot function without it. Although it seems simple, finding the right water to drink can be challenging. Tap vs. bottled water? Which is safer and healthier? Which is better for the environment? What about taste, price and convenience? Choosing the right water can be a complicated and frustrating dilemma; however, the following reasons may help you recognize and appreciate the benefits of choosing tap water.

  1. Most bottled water is just filtered tap water, including Aquafina & Dasani brands.
  2. Tap water is practically free. Even if you filter it, you’ll save a bundle drinking it instead of bottled water.
  3. While bottled water is generally safe, it’s actually less regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency than municipal water supplies.
  4. Municipal water supplies must test water annually and report results to the public. You can find a report on your municipal water supply or see Fort Atkinson’s most recent water quality report.
  5. Reliable contamination test kits for your private well can be purchased online for less than $20. To find out what contaminants to test for, or for a list of local labs, contact the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
  6. Tap water is (usually) fluoridated which is associated with less tooth decay.
  7. 17 million barrels of oil are used each year to produce water bottles.
  8. Consumers deposit only about 30% of their plastic bottles in recycling bins.
Hide

Ease the Ache of Joint Pain

In "The Wizard of Oz," a few squirts from an oil can are all it takes to cure the Tin Man’s stiff and creaky joints. In the real world, unfortunately, joint problems are much harder to treat, as a growing number of people with osteoarthritis can attest.


Read more

In "The Wizard of Oz," a few squirts from an oil can are all it takes to cure the Tin Man’s stiff and creaky joints. In the real world, unfortunately, joint problems are much harder to treat, as a growing number of people with osteoarthritis can attest.

If you suffer from osteoarthritis, you might be avoiding physical activity to try and prevent further pain and damage. But you may want to rethink this strategy. While following a yellow brick road may not be appropriate for everyone, experts increasingly recommend physical activity to help ease joint pain.

What Is Osteoarthritis?
In a healthy joint, cartilage (a firm, rubbery tissue) cushions the space between the bones, allowing them to glide over one another. Osteoarthritis occurs when the cartilage wears away, and one bone begins to rub on another. Bone spurs may form around the joint, and the muscles and ligaments supporting the joint frequently become weaker and stiffer.

Osteoarthritis sufferers often feel pain, swelling and stiffness. Common problem areas include knees, hips, feet, hands and shoulders. Osteoarthritis has traditionally been considered a problem of the elderly; according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, almost everyone has some symptoms of osteoarthritis by age 70. But a growing number of middle-aged and young adults have osteoarthritis, caused by obesity and/or sports injuries.

The Right Kind of Exercise Can Help
At first, even mild exercise may be painful for osteoarthritis sufferers. But over time, the benefits of low-impact physical activity tend to add up. Exercise can help:

  • Improve joint function. Range-of-motion and flexibility exercises such as Tai Chi and yoga can help replenish lubrication in the joint cartilage. Over time, this may result in less stiffness and pain. Fort HealthCare offers classes that promote range-of-motion and flexibility, such as Rusty Hinges, Rusty Hinges Water Exercise Class, T’ai Chi and Yoga. Additionally, senior citizens receive a 10% discount on most health and wellness classes offered by Fort HealthCare.
  • Build up muscles that support the joints. Strengthening the muscles around joints improves their ability to hold the joints in their proper (and least painful) position. Stronger muscles are also better at absorbing shock that would otherwise be exerted on cartilage – especially in the knees and hips.
  • Promote weight loss. Each pound of extra body weight exerts the equivalent of four pounds of stress on the knees, so maintaining a healthy weight is important to prevent knee pain. Aerobic exercise that doesn’t heavily stress the hips, knees and spine (such as walking, swimming or water aerobics) can help with weight control. Physical activity can also reduce joint inflammation, improve sleep, fight depression and provide a host of other health benefits. The key is to avoid activities that jar the joints, such as running or high-impact aerobics. Talk to your doctor about which activities may be right for you, and which ones to avoid. Fort HealthCare has teamed up with the American Heart Association to encourage people to incorporate physical activity into their daily lives. Walkers are welcome on the first floor of Fort Memorial Hospital, 6 a.m. – 8 p.m. daily, where windows provide a view of the outside, and a carpeted floor cushions your steps. Stop by the information desk to sign in for each visit.

There’s No Place Like Home
If joint pain has prevented you from enjoying your normal daily activities, you don’t have to travel far for help. Fort HealthCare is hosting a free seminar about joint health and related conditions on Tuesday, June 4, beginning at 2 p.m. at the Three Pillars Senior Living Community. More information is available in the "FREE SEMINAR: Help for Hand, Hip and Knee Pain" article in the News section.

Hide

As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Give birth to hope—Cord blood donation

Quick, easy, painless, and saves lives. You would want to know more, right? New mothers have the opportunity to save the life of someone who may need a stem cell transplant by simply donating cord blood, a simple and painless process.


Read more
News

Fort HealthCare and other community agencies team up for Camp 911

Fort HealthCare is holding the third annual Camp 911, a one-day program focusing on safety, prevention techniques and health and wellness for children entering fourth through sixth grades in the upcoming 2013-2014 school year. Camp 911 will be held Wednesday, June 12 and Thursday, August 22 from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Fort Memorial Hospital.


Read more

FREE SEMINAR: Help for Hand, Hip and Knee Pain

Fort HealthCare is hosting a free seminar about joint health and related conditions on Tuesday, June 4, beginning at 2 p.m. at the Three Pillars Senior Living Community. Three Pillars is located at 36225 Sunset Drive in Dousman, Wis. The seminar is educational, and free for anyone to attend.


Read more

Fort HealthCare honors volunteers

Fort HealthCare honored its many volunteers at the annual awards banquet on April 25 at Jansen’s Banquet Hall in Fort Atkinson. Over 230 adult volunteers contributed 22,438 hours of service during 2012. In addition, 630 hours were volunteered by area high school and college students. Honoring volunteers at the banquet were Fort HealthCare’s Mike Wallace, president/CEO, Kay Wipperfurth, vice president of ancillary and support services and Kari Behling, manager of volunteer services.


Read more

Pilots’ Medical Certification Available Locally

Aaron J. Beck, MD, of Fort HealthCare Integrated Family Care, recently completed training as an Aviation Medical Examiner (AME) with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Dr. Beck is available for both routine aviation physical examinations and appointments to evaluate a pilot’s acute medical condition between his or her routinely scheduled exams. He and Fort HealthCare’s Donald Bates, MD offer medical certification exams for local pilots.


Read more

Fort HealthCare Leads Efforts to Improve Jefferson County Health Rankings

The University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute (UWPHI) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) released the 2013 County Health Rankings on March 20. The county health rankings examine the health and well-being of people living in nearly every county in every state in the country, and shows that how long and how well people live depends upon multiple factors beyond just their access to medical care. The annual report ranks counties according to their summary measures of health outcomes and health factors.


Read more

Celebrate Hand Therapy Week: June 3 – 9, 2013

During June 3-9, 2013, the Fort HealthCare Center for Hand Care will celebrate Hand Therapy Week. Hand Therapy Week is an integrated national program sponsored by the American Society of Hand Therapists (ASHT). For one week, ASHT members bring the benefits of hand therapy into focus for the public and demonstrate the advantages of prevention and treatment procedures for individuals who have been affected by an accident or trauma.


Read more

Fort HealthCare Integrated Family Care Open House

The newly constructed Fort Healthcare Integrated Family Care clinic will be hosting an open house event for the public on Tuesday, June 18, 2013 between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. The clinic is located at 1520 Madison Avenue in Fort Atkinson. The open house is a great opportunity to meet the providers and staff, explore the new building, and receive information about services offered.


Read more
Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
June 3 Zumba
June 4 Rusty Hinges
June 4 Zumba
June 5 Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
June 5 Zumba
June 6 Zumba
June 6 FREE Wellness Screening
June 7 Childbirth Preparation Classes
June 8 Run for the Rock
June 10 Having Healthy Babies
June 11 Healthy-Steps
June 12 Camp 911
June 12 Rusty Hinges Water Exercise Class
June 15 Fort Half Marathon
June 17 Cardio Kickboxing
June 17 Core, Balance and Stretch
June 17 Skinny Arms Express
June 18 Boot Camp
June 18 Glutes & Abs
June 18 Upper Body Sculpt
June 19 Body Blast
June 19 Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
June 19 Step Aerobics
June 19 Upper Body Sculpt
June 20 Lower Body Sculpt
June 20 Boot Camp
June 20 Cardio Kickboxing
June 20 Glutes & Abs
June 20 Lower Body Sculpt
June 21 Blood Drive
June 23 PADA Golf Outing
June 26 Heartsaver CPR/AED
June 28 Boot Camp Express
June 28 Cardio Kickboxing Express
Recipes

Ratatouille Polenta Bake

Ratatouille is a traditional French stewed vegetable dish. The polenta, made from ground cornmeal and a staple of Italian cuisine for generations, adds a hardy aspect to an otherwise very light dish. This recipe, from livebetteramerica.com, is tasty, filling, and easy to reheat leftovers the next day.



Read more

Ratatouille is a traditional French stewed vegetable dish. The polenta, made from ground cornmeal and a staple of Italian cuisine for generations, adds a hardy aspect to an otherwise very light dish. This recipe, from livebetteramerica.com, is tasty, filling, and easy to reheat leftovers the next day.
Prep time: 25 minutes
Ready in: 1 hour 15 minutes
Servings: 6 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 medium onion, coarsely chopped (1/2 cup)
  • 1 medium bell pepper, coarsely chopped (1 cup)
  • 1 small unpeeled eggplant (1 pound), diced (2 cups)
  • 1 medium zucchini, diced (1 cup)
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper
  • 1 can (14 ½ ounces) Italian-style stewed tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 tube (18 ounces) refrigerated plain polenta (or any flavor)
  • 2 tablespoons shredded Parmesan cheese
  • ½ cup finely shredded mozzarella cheese (2 ounces)
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

Preparation

  1. Heat oven to 375ºF. Spray 12-inch nonstick skillet with cooking spray; heat over medium-high heat. Cook onion and bell pepper in skillet 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in eggplant, zucchini and pepper. Cook 3 to 4 minutes, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are tender. Stir in tomatoes, breaking up with spoon; reduce heat to low. Cook 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  2. Spray rectangular baking dish, 11x7x1 1/2 inches, with cooking spray. Cut polenta into 1/4-inch slices. Arrange slices on bottom of dish, overlapping and cutting to fit where necessary. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Spoon vegetable mixture evenly over top.
  3. Cover and bake 30 minutes. Sprinkle with mozzarella cheese and parsley. Bake uncovered about 15 minutes or until cheese is melted and casserole is bubbly. Let stand 5 minutes before serving.

Nutrition

  • Per serving: 150 Calories; 30 Calories from Fat; 3 g Total Fat; 1 ½ g Saturated Fat; 0 g Trans Fat; 5 mg Cholesterol; 740 mg Sodium; 24 g Total Carbohydrate; 3 g Dietary Fiber; 11 g Sugars; 6 g Protein
Hide
©2016 Fort HealthCare | 611 Sherman Avenue East Fort Atkinson, WI 53538
Phone: 920.568.5000 | www.forthealthcare.com