Health365 eNews
February 2015 • Volume 7, Issue 2

February is American Heart Month

Heart disease is the biggest killer of American women and men. But, it’s also a preventable disease in many cases.

With February designated American Heart Month, Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, director of Women’s Heart Health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, offers 10 tips for reducing your risk of cardiovascular trouble:


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Heart disease is the biggest killer of American women and men. But, it’s also a preventable disease in many cases.

With February designated American Heart Month, Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, director of Women’s Heart Health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, offers 10 tips for reducing your risk of cardiovascular trouble:

  • Know your numbers: Tests will give you insight into your risk for heart disease. Keep track of your blood pressure, cholesterol levels, hemoglobin A1C (blood sugars) and inflammatory markers.
  • Watch your diet: “Research has shown a diet high in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts and olive oil — consistent with the Mediterranean diet — can decrease the incidence of heart disease by 30 percent, whereas diets high in saturated fats and simple sugars can increase the risk of heart disease by 30 percent,” Steinbaum said. “Paying attention to what you are eating is one of the major cornerstones of keeping your heart healthy.”
  • Exercise: American Heart Association guidelines recommend two and a half hours of cardiovascular exercise per week, Steinbaum said. Exercise lowers the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, obesity and other medical conditions.
  • Manage your stress: “Stress takes a toll on the heart, increasing hormones throughout the body [that are] associated with the ‘flight-or-fight syndrome,’ leading to an increase in heart rate and blood pressure,” Steinbaum said. “It can also increase the stress hormones, such as cortisol, which causes inflammation, all leading to heart disease. We all have stress in our lives, and managing it is a large part of being heart-healthy.”
  • Master the art of well-being: Positive emotions such as optimism can lower your risk of heart disease, and laughter is helpful too, Steinbaum said. It boosts the immune system, decreases stress and lowers blood pressure.
  • Keep your arteries healthy: “Foods like dark chocolate, berries, tea and red wine … help to dilate the arteries, decrease blood pressure, lower cholesterol and prevent clotting,” Steinbaum said. “If there is stiffness to the lining of the arteries, called the endothelium, then you are at risk to develop heart disease. An EndoPAT test, which is a noninvasive test assessing the function of the endothelium, can alert you if you are a candidate for building up plaque in the arteries of the heart, which can lead to heart attack.”
  • Be aware of gender differences in heart disease: If you’re concerned that you have symptoms of heart disease, seek help and call 911. Some women are hesitant about getting assistance because they worry they may be wrong. “Always be safe rather than sorry,” Steinbaum said. For women, signs of heart disease can be subtle: shortness of breath, jaw pain, back pain, nausea, vomiting, sleep disturbances or fatigue.
  • Talk to your family: Get information about your family’s medical history. “Although heart disease is due to lifestyle choices 80 percent to 90 percent of the time, a significant family history is critical to know,” Steinbaum said. “If you had a mother with heart disease [when she was younger than] 65 years old, or a father with heart disease [at younger than] 55 years old, early diagnosis and prevention is key. The earlier you know, the more chance you have to change your outcome and be in control of your potential destiny.”
  • If you’re a woman, consider your pregnancy history: If you had high blood pressure or elevated sugars during pregnancy, you are at higher risk of heart disease.
  • Be proactive about screening tests: “If you have multiple risk factors for heart disease or a strong family history, get screened … to determine your real risk of heart disease,” Steinbaum said. “If [your test results] are abnormal, then your risk goes up and aggressive prevention should start immediately, whether it is lifestyle changes or medication. Having the information empowers you to make a difference in the rest of your life’s heart health. It is worth getting the information.”
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Risk Factors for Heart Disease

A risk factor is something that increases your chance of having heart disease. Most people with heart disease have more than one risk factor. Heart disease (also called coronary artery disease) involves damage to arteries, the blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood from your heart out through your body. Things like smoking or high cholesterol can damage arteries. You can’t control some risk factors, such as age and a family history of heart disease. But most, including those listed below, are things you can control.


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A risk factor is something that increases your chance of having heart disease. Most people with heart disease have more than one risk factor. Heart disease (also called coronary artery disease) involves damage to arteries, the blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood from your heart out through your body. Things like smoking or high cholesterol can damage arteries. You can’t control some risk factors, such as age and a family history of heart disease. But most, including those listed below, are things you can control.

High Cholesterol

Cholesterol is a fatty substance in your blood. It can build up inside your arteries and block the blood flow to your heart or brain. Your risk of heart disease goes up if you have high levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol or triglycerides (another substance that can build up) You’re also at risk if you don’t have enough HDL cholesterol (“good”) cholesterol which helps clear the bad cholesterol away.

Smoking

This is the most important risk factor you can change. Smoking damages your arteries. It reduces blood flow to your heart and brain. It greatly increases your risk of heart disease, stroke, lung disease, and cancer. If you smoke, you are two to four times more likely to develop coronary artery disease.

High blood pressure

High blood pressure occurs when blood pushes too hard against artery walls as it passes through the arteries. This damages the artery lining. High blood pressure raises your risk of heart attack, also known as acute myocardial infarction, or AMI, and especially stroke.

Metabolic syndrome

This is caused by a combination of certain risk factors. It puts you at extra high risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. You have metabolic syndrome if you have three or more of the following: low HDL cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist.

Diabetes

Diabetes occurs when you have high levels of sugar (glucose) in your blood. This can damage arteries if not kept under control. Having diabetes also makes you more likely to have a silent heart attack—one without any symptoms.

Excess weight

Excess weight makes other risk factors, such as diabetes, more likely. Excess weight around the waist or stomach increases your heart disease risk the most.

Lack of physical activity

When you’re not active, you’re more likely to develop diabetes, high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels, and excess weight.

Negative emotions

Stress, pent-up anger, and other negative emotions have been linked to heart disease. Over time, these emotions could raise your heart disease risk.

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Heart safety tips for shoveling snow

The first major snowstorm of 2015 has hit the Northeast. As people dig out there and elsewhere this winter, the American Heart Association warns that some people may be at increased risk of a heart attack during snow shoveling.


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The first major snowstorm of 2015 has hit the Northeast. As people dig out there and elsewhere this winter, the American Heart Association warns that some people may be at increased risk of a heart attack during snow shoveling.

The combination of colder temperatures and physical exertion increases the workload on the heart. That’s why people who are outdoors in cold weather should avoid sudden exertion, such as lifting a heavy shovel packed with snow. Even walking through heavy, wet snow or snow drifts can strain the heart.

“For people with existing heart conditions like heart failure, high blood pressure or cholesterol, the increased workload on the heart from activities such as shoveling of heavy snow, can put them at higher risk for heart attack,” said Patrick Thomas, M.D., an AHA fellow and president of the AHA’s Putnam County Region in New York.

“Before you do anything, check with your doctor to make sure it’s safe for your particular situation,” said Thomas, a cardiologist at NYU Langone at Hudson Valley Cardiology.

Here are tips for heart-safe snow shoveling:

  • Give yourself a break. Take frequent breaks to avoid overstressing your heart. Pay attention to how your body feels during those breaks.
  • Don’t eat a big meal before or soon after shoveling. Eating a large meal can put an extra load on your heart. Use a small shovel or a snow thrower. The act of lifting heavy snow can raise blood pressure during the lift. It is safer to lift smaller amounts. When possible, simply push the snow.
  • Learn the heart attack warning signs and listen to your body. Even if you’re not sure it’s a heart attack, have it checked out. Carry your cell phone in your pocket and call 911 immediately if you experience any signs of a heart attack.
  • Do not drink alcohol before or immediately after shoveling. Alcohol can increase a person’s sensation of warmth and may cause you to underestimate the extra strain your body is under in the cold.
  • Consult a doctor ahead of time. Before you start shoveling, talk with your doctor if you have a medical condition, do not exercise on a regular basis or are middle-aged or older.
  • Know the dangers of hypothermia. Heart failure causes most deaths from hypothermia. To prevent hypothermia, dress in layers of warm clothing. This traps air between layers, forming protective insulation around your body. Because a lot of body heat is lost through the head, be sure to also wear a warm hat.

Article from www.heart.org

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What is seasonal affective disorder?

Seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, is a mood disorder characterized by depression related to a certain season of the year – especially winter. However, SAD is often not described as a separate mood disorder but as a “specifier,” referring to the seasonal pattern of major depressive episodes that can occur within major depression and manic depression. SAD is a clinical diagnosis accepted in the medical community. Norman E. Rosenthal, M.D. is the researcher credited with discovering SAD.


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Seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, is a mood disorder characterized by depression related to a certain season of the year – especially winter. However, SAD is often not described as a separate mood disorder but as a “specifier,” referring to the seasonal pattern of major depressive episodes that can occur within major depression and manic depression. SAD is a clinical diagnosis accepted in the medical community. Norman E. Rosenthal, M.D. is the researcher credited with discovering SAD.

Who is affected by SAD?

Onset usually occurs during adulthood (with the average onset occurring at approximately age 23), and is more likely to affect women than men. According to the National Mental Health Disorders Association, approximately 10 to 20 percent of the population suffers from mild winter SAD, and nearly 5 percent suffer from a more severe form of the disorder.

What are the symptoms of seasonal affective disorder?

Two seasonal patterns of symptoms have been identified with SAD: a fall-onset type, also called “winter depression,” in which major depressive episodes begin in the late fall to early winter months and remit during the summer months, and a spring-onset type, also called “summer depression,” in which the severe depressive episode begins in late spring to early summer. The following are the most common symptoms of SAD. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

  • Increased sleep and daytime drowsiness
  • Irritability
  • Fatigue, or low energy level
  • Decreased sex drive
  • Diminished concentration
  • Difficulty thinking clearly
  • Increased appetite, especially for sweets and carbohydrates causing weight gain

The symptoms of SAD may resemble other psychiatric conditions. Always see your health care provider for a diagnosis.

What causes SAD?

Decreased sunlight is thought to be part of the cause of SAD, and is under clinical investigation.

Treatment for seasonal affective disorder

Specific treatment for SAD will be determined by your health care provider based on:

  • Your age, overall health, and medical history
  • Extent of the disease
  • Your tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies
  • Expectations for the course of the disease
  • Your opinion or preference

The treatments for “winter depression” and “summer depression” often differ, and may include any, or a combination, of the following:

  • Light therapy
  • Antidepressant medications
  • Psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy or interpersonal therapy
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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

February Monthly Challenge

Find the AHA Heart and enter to win a FREE Heart Saver Class at FortHealthCare.com/Heart for the February Monthly Contest For Health.

January Contest ‘For Health’ Winner: Jean Waggoner of Fort Atkinson won 4 tickets and a gift certificate to the Young Auditorium. Congratulations Jean!


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News

Slimdown Challenge

The 2015 Slimdown Challenge is an eight-week, individual-based weight-loss and health improvement challenge that invites all community members eighteen years and older to participate. Visit FortHealthCare.com/Slimdown for even more details.

Challenge Timeline

January 14th – Eligibility Registration and sign-up opens

January 26th – Weigh-ins begin

February 6th – Eligibility Registration and weigh-ins end

February 10th – Challenge begins

Monday nights at 11:59pm – Weekly tasks are due

April 7th – Challenge ends

How do I sign up?

  1. Community members who did not previously participate in Rock the Walk 2014, please visit FortHealthCare.com/Slimdown to fill out the Eligibility Registration form at the bottom of the page. Please fill out all information correctly and choose a location before submitting (see Question C).
  2. Community members who did participate in Rock the Walk 2014 may visit FortHealthCare.com/Slimdown, click “Cerner Account Log-In”, and log in to their existing account. Then, click the “Sign Up!” button for the 2015 Slimdown Challenge and you’re all set!
  3. Fort HealthCare employees in the wellness program and currently participating in Health for the Holidays may sign in at CernerHealth.com, click the ‘plus’ sign next to the current challenge, and then click “Sign Up!” to join the Slimdown. Visual instructions are below

 

slimdown-signup-1slimdown-signup-2


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Movin’ and Losin’ Adults

Check out this fun and motivating program that incorporates different instructors, a variety of health-related topics and an exercise portion!

feb-movin-losin


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New Extended Hours in March

Starting in March, our Lake Mills and Integrated Family Care clinics are extended their clinic hours to better accommodate our patients’ busy schedules. The new extended hours will improve access, increasing the choices for those unable to make appointments during daytime business hours.

fort-lake-mills

Call 920-648-8393 to schedule an appointment.

8am-8pm Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday

8am-5pm Wednesday

Urgent Care Hours

Saturday 8am-8pm Sunday 10am-8pm

fort-integrated-family

Call 920-563-5500 to schedule an appointment.

8 am – 7 pm Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday

8am-5pm Monday & Friday


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
February 4 AHA Heartsaver
February 5 Basic Tai Chi
February 5 Continuing Tai Chi
February 5 Corrections Tai Chi
February 7 Childbirth prep
February 9 Core, Balance, Stretch
February 9 Cardio kickboxing
February 9 Form and Function
February 9 Movin’ and Losin’ Adults
February 9 Obtaining ABG’s
February 9 Having Healthy Babies
February 10 Boot Camp
February 10 Upper Body Sculpt
February 10 Glutes and Abs
February 11 Step aerobics
February 11 PEARS
February 12 Cardio kickboxing
February 12 Lower Body Sculpt
February 12 Boot Camp
February 12 Glutes and Abs
February 12 BLS
February 13 Cardio kickboxing
February 14 AHA Heartsaver Family
February 18 Skinny Arms
February 18 Body Blast
February 18 Glutes and Abs
February 18 AHA Heartsaver
February 20 BLS
February 21 On my own at home
February 23 Beginning Yoga
February 23 Continuing Yoga
February 24 No Nonsense, Low-impact
February 24 Beginning Yoga
February 25 AHA ACLS
February 25 Noon Beginning Yoga
February 26 Zumba
Recipes

Smoked Salmon Pasta Salad

Ingredients

  • 2 C uncooked farfalle (bow tie pasta)
  • 1-1/2 C sliced asparagus (about 12 oz.)
  • 4 oz. package smoked salmon
  • 1-1/4 C grape or cherry tomatoes
  • 1/3 C crumbled feta cheese with basil and sun-dried tomatoes
  • 1/2 C reduced-fat olive oil vinaigrette
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 1/4 t freshly ground black pepper


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Ingredients

  • 2 C uncooked farfalle (bow tie pasta)
  • 1-1/2 C sliced asparagus (about 12 oz.)
  • 4 oz. package smoked salmon
  • 1-1/4 C grape or cherry tomatoes
  • 1/3 C crumbled feta cheese with basil and sun-dried tomatoes
  • 1/2 C reduced-fat olive oil vinaigrette
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 1/4 t freshly ground black pepper

Directions

  1. Cook pasta in boiling water for 7 minutes, omitting salt and fat. Add asparagus; cook 4 more minutes. Drain pasta mixture. Rinse with cold water; drain well.
  2. Cut salmon into 1/2-inch-wide strips.
  3. Combine pasta mixture, salmon, tomatoes and remaining ingredients in a large bowl; toss gently.

Makes four 1/2 cup servings.

Use a salt substitute and less cheese to make this recipe even healthier!

Nutrition

  • Calories: 385
  • Fat: 12.7 gm
  • Saturated fat: 3.2 g
  • Carbohydrate: 53.1 gm
  • Cholesterol: 27 mg
  • Sodium: 773 mg

From FortHealthcare.com/patient-info/healthy-recipes/

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