Health365 eNews
September 2014 • Volume 6, Issue 4

Fort HealthCare is Excellent Care

Fort HealthCare’s Center for Joint Replacement Rates High in Patient Satisfaction

Fort HealthCare’s Center for Joint Replacement received high marks in patient satisfaction, rapid recovery, and low complication rates for the second year in a row according to Marshall Steele & Associates, a healthcare consulting and management company. The data was based on hip and knee surgeries performed during the period of January 2013 to December 2013.


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Fort HealthCare’s Center for Joint Replacement Rates High in Patient Satisfaction

Fort HealthCare’s Center for Joint Replacement received high marks in patient satisfaction, rapid recovery, and low complication rates for the second year in a row according to Marshall Steele & Associates, a healthcare consulting and management company. The data was based on hip and knee surgeries performed during the period of January 2013 to December 2013.

Fort HealthCare’s patient satisfaction scores are outstanding when compared to other hospitals in Wisconsin. Overall patient satisfaction with joint replacement surgery at Fort HealthCare was 20 percentage points higher when compared to other facilities in the state, with 87 percent of patients reporting satisfaction with their Fort HealthCare experience versus a 67 percent satisfaction rate for other Wisconsin hospitals. 87 percent of patients would “definitely recommend” Fort HealthCare’s Center for Joint Replacement.

Another factor in the patient experience is rapid recovery and transition back home. Fort HealthCare patients leave the hospital sooner, spending an average of two days in the hospital compared with close to four days for other Wisconsin hospitals. And in 2013, 91 percent of patients went directly home from the hospital, receiving outpatient therapy instead of being discharged to a rehabilitation facility.

Complication rates related to hip and knee surgery continue to be low. Possible complications that could affect a patient’s rapid recovery include infection, blood clots, and severe bruising. For hip and knee replacement patients in 2013, Fort HealthCare saw a zero percent complication rate during a patient’s stay in the hospital. This was the second year in a row for a zero percent complication rate compared to a national complication rate average of 2.6 percent. Within 30 days of surgery, the complication rate for Fort HealthCare patients was 2.5 percent compared to a 4.0 percent national average.

Fort HealthCare’s Center for Joint Replacement is focused on patient care. The Fort HealthCare Center for Joint Replacement provides an exceptional patient-centered surgery and rehabilitation experience for total hip and knee joint replacements. The entire joint replacement program is designed with the patient in mind – from pre-surgery education to specialized surgical care, through physical and occupational therapy to complete recovery. The goal is to provide seamless, coordinated care to get patients back to their favorite activities as soon as possible.

The board certified physicians of Fort HealthCare Orthopaedic Associates have a great passion for what they do and are committed to providing the highest quality patient care. This team of experts includes James Bruno, MD; Thomas Nordland, MD; Paul Schuppner, DO and Isidoro Zambrano, MD.

For more information regarding the Fort HealthCare Center for Joint Replacement, visit FortHealthCare.com/Joint or call (920) 568-5318.

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Fitness Course Moves to Johnson Creek!

Fort HealthCare is hosting free, open gym sessions utilizing the new Railyard Obstacle Course during the winter months. This mobile playground has been available most Sunday afternoons beginning this past January and changes locations throughout communities in Jefferson County each month. The two hour sessions begin at the Johnson Creek High School, 111 South Street in Johnson Creek on March 30, April 6 and 13 from 2-4 p.m.


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Fort HealthCare is hosting free, open gym sessions utilizing the new Railyard Obstacle Course during the winter months. This mobile playground has been available most Sunday afternoons beginning this past January and changes locations throughout communities in Jefferson County each month. The two hour sessions begin at the Johnson Creek High School, 111 South Street in Johnson Creek on March 30, April 6 and 13 from 2-4 p.m.

The Railyard Obstacle Course sessions are a great opportunity for children to have fun and be active this winter. There is no obligation to pay however free-will donations will be accepted. Parents must be present to supervise children and are welcome to participate. The equipment has received much great attendance at Cambridge Elementary School in February and Jefferson High School in March. The equipment will be available at Johnson Creek High School in April and Fort Atkinson High School in May.

The Railyard Obstacle Course has received rave reviews from physical education, athletic conditioning, personal training and institutional experts locally and worldwide and has been used by college and professional athletes for over 16 years. The course helps develop core strength, cardiovascular fitness and gains in balance, speed, power, agility, flexibility, and coordination.

Designed to mimic activities performed in day-to-day lives—climbing, crawling, balancing, ducking, jumping, and walking—it is able to be used by everyone of all ages and fitness levels. Tiffany Frohmader, Fort HealthCare Wellness Specialist said, “This course is like an indoor playground that disguises the fact you’re getting a dynamic workout.” The equipment was purchased by the Fort Memorial Foundation with goals of promoting family fitness, pediatric wellness and combatting childhood obesity.

For more information about the Railyard Obstacle Course and for a complete open gym schedule, visit FortHealthCare.com/Railyard or contact Andrea Billinghurst at (920) 568-5244.

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World Health Day- April 7, 2014

What are vectors and vector-borne diseases?

Vectors are organisms that transmit pathogens and parasites from one infected person (or animal) to another. Vector-borne diseases are illnesses caused by these pathogens and parasites in human populations. They are most commonly found in tropical areas and places where access to safe drinking-water and sanitation systems is problematic.

The most deadly vector-borne disease, malaria, caused an estimated 660 000 deaths in 2010. Most of these were African children. However, the world’s fastest growing vector-borne disease is dengue, with a 30-fold increase in disease incidence over the last 50 years. Globalization of trade and travel and environmental challenges such as climate change and urbanization are having an impact on transmission of vector-borne diseases, and causing their appearance in countries where they were previously unknown.

In recent years, renewed commitments from ministries of health, regional and global health initiatives – with the support of foundations, nongovernmental organizations, the private sector and the scientific community – have helped to lower the incidence and death rates from some vector-borne diseases.

World Health Day 2014 will spotlight some of the most commonly known vectors – such as mosquitoes, sandflies, bugs, ticks and snails – responsible for transmitting a wide range of parasites and pathogens that attack humans or animals. Mosquitoes, for example, not only transmit malaria and dengue, but also lymphatic filariasis, chikungunya, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever.

Goal: better protection from vector-borne diseases

The campaign aims to raise awareness about the threat posed by vectors and vector-borne diseases and to stimulate families and communities to take action to protect themselves. A core element of the campaign will be to provide communities with information. As vector-borne diseases begin to spread beyond their traditional boundaries, action needs to be expanded beyond the countries where these diseases currently thrive.

More broadly, through the campaign, we are aiming for the following:

  • families living in areas where diseases are transmitted by vectors know how to protect themselves;
  • travelers know how to protect themselves from vectors and vector-borne diseases when travelling to countries where these pose a health threat;
  • in countries where vector-borne diseases are a public health problem, ministries of health put in place measures to improve the protection of their populations; and
  • in countries where vector-borne diseases are an emerging threat, health authorities work with environmental and relevant authorities locally and in neighboring countries to improve integrated surveillance of vectors and to take measures to prevent their proliferation.
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Save the Date!

Mark your calendars as on Thursday, June 19th between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m., Fort HealthCare is hosting the third annual Healthy Community Summit, which is a meeting for key influencers in population health management and positive health and wellness policy change. (More information to follow at a later date) .

Fort HealthCare believes a wide-reaching health and wellness campaign can positively affect individual and community-wide health outcomes and behaviors. This includes sponsorship of a variety of fitness events and wellness challenges that are open to the public. To this end Fort HealthCare created and continues to support a network of Healthy Community Coalitions, located throughout Jefferson County.

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April: Tips to a Healthier you!

Don’t Just Feel Younger – Be Younger Too!

Changing the way you eat can actually change your body’s chemistry-leading to clearer arteries, stronger bones, smoother skin, a smarter brain… and an all-around younger you!


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Don’t Just Feel Younger – Be Younger Too!

Changing the way you eat can actually change your body’s chemistry-leading to clearer arteries, stronger bones, smoother skin, a smarter brain… and an all-around younger you!

Grapes keep your eyesight sharp for years!

Beets raise your energy level and improve your muscle function

Tuna brings down blood pressure and controls cholesterol.

Anyone, including seniors, can turn their health around just by choosing the right foods to eat, you’ll live longer!

Source: Super abundant Health Gayle K. Wood’s Pocket Companion Winter 2014

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Eat This, Not That - Fort HealthCare Style

You may have the slogan “Eat This, Not That” coined from Men’s Health magazine that offers healthier alternatives to typical cuisine in various forms at the supermarket, restaurants, and even fast food. The premise is to cut out a food or drink that is deemed “unhealthy” and replace it with a similar product that has greater health benefits.


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You may have the slogan “Eat This, Not That” coined from Men’s Health magazine that offers healthier alternatives to typical cuisine in various forms at the supermarket, restaurants, and even fast food. The premise is to cut out a food or drink that is deemed “unhealthy” and replace it with a similar product that has greater health benefits.

To supplement the Fort HealthCare Slimdown challenge, one of the Community Health and Wellness interns decided to incorporate the “Eat This, Not That” concept to everyday foods and drinks that are served in the Steel Away Café. Each week will focus on a food group and how to include new and tasty food choices into your diet, which include fruits, vegetables, snacks and desserts. Free samples, handouts and appearances by the dietician will be provided in addition to employee wellness points for stopping by.

This program will run every Monday through April 28th in the Steel Away Café at the hospital from 11a until 1:30p.

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Stress Awareness Month

First Steps to Effective Stress Management:

1. Recognize that you have the power to make decisions, to more effectively manage your stress level

2. Recognize your personal Signs of Stress

Stress can present itself in many ways.


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First Steps to Effective Stress Management:

1. Recognize that you have the power to make decisions, to more effectively manage your stress level

2. Recognize your personal Signs of Stress

Stress can present itself in many ways.

The Physical signs of stress may include:

  • Muscle tension
  • Headaches
  • Restless sleeps
  • Stomach and digestive problems

These symptoms are brought on by the release of adrenaline and cortisol, the hormones that ready our bodies for a “flight or fight” response.

Mental signs of stress:

  • Poor concentration
  • Racing thoughts
  • Low productivity
  • Forgetfulness

Emotional signs of stress:

  • Irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Mood swings

Spiritual signs of stress:

  • Cynicism
  • Lack of fulfilment

Social signs of stress:

  • Intolerance for others
  • Lashing out

We’ve all experienced some of these signs in our lives brought on by varying degrees of stress. But if you have been experiencing these signs over a prolonged time, it may be an indicator that you have an unhealthy level of stress and you should take steps to eliminate the stressors.

3. Look more closely at your lifestyle and see what can be changed in:

  • Your work situation
  • Your family situation
  • Your thoughts
  • Your schedule
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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Giving Circle Grants Announcement

The Giving Circle of Fort Memorial Hospital Foundation is pleased to announce the grants that were awarded from funds raised during its 2013 program year. The grants totaling $14,550 were awarded to three health and wellness initiatives at Fort HealthCare.


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News

Angie Smith Meets Lt. Governor Kleefisch

Lt. Governor Rebecca Kleefisch visited Opportunities Inc. Training and Employment Programs on Friday, February 28, 2014. She visited with local community employers who partner with Opportunities to provide people with barriers to employment the chance to work in their community.


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Cardiac Rehab Receives New Equipment

Two new pieces of exercise equipment; compliments of the Fort HealthCare Partners Love Lights program were recently put into place in the cardiopulmonary rehabilitation department at Fort Memorial Hospital.

A recumbent cross training machine and a new recumbent bike are now ready for use in the cardiopulmonary modern gym area. The recumbent cross trainer is great for all skill levels and can help most cardiac rehabilitation patients regain their health and independence through exercise.


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April’s Vegetable: Asparagus

Just as a spear is used as a weapon, asparagus’s javelin-shaped form could be viewed as symbolic for its age- and disease-fighting abilities. Asparagus is just packed with health benefits:
  1. It’s loaded with nutrients: Asparagus is a very good source of fiber, folate, vitamins A, C, E and K, as well as chromium, a trace mineral that enhances the ability of insulin to transport glucose from the bloodstream into cells.

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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
April 21 Beginning Yoga
April 21 Continuing Yoga
April 23 Yoga Express
April 15 Aqua Zumba
April 16 Body Blast
April 21 Boot Camp
April 22 Boot Camp
April 24 Boot Camp
April 25 Boot Camp Express
April 21 Cardio Kickboxing
April 24 Cardio Kickboxing
April 25 Cardio Kickboxing Express
April 21 Core, Balance and Stretch
April 22 Glutes and Abs
April 24 Glutes and Abs
April 23 Lower Body Sculpt
April 24 Lower Body Sculpt
April 22 No Nonsense, Low-Impact Workout
April 16 Skinny Arms Express
April 21 Skinny Arms Express
April 23 Step Aerobics
April 22 Upper Body Sculpt
April 23 Upper Body Sculpt
April 21 Zumba
April 22 Zumba
April 23 Zumba
April 24 Zumba Gold
Recipes

Garlic Roasted Asparagus

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds fresh asparagus spears
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Makes: 6 servings

Prep: 15 mins

Roast: 10 mins 450°F



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Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds fresh asparagus spears
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Makes: 6 servings

Prep: 15 mins

Roast: 10 mins 450°F

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Snap off and discard woody bases from asparagus. Place asparagus and garlic in a 15x10x1inch baking pan. Drizzle with oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Toss to coat.

2. Roast for 10 to 15 minutes or until asparagus is crisp-tender, stirring once halfway through roasting. Serve immediately. Makes 6 servings

Nutrition Facts

64kcal cal.;5 g Fat, total; 0mg chol.; 1 g sat. fat; 5g g carb.; 3 g monosaturated fat; 1 g Polyunsaturated fat; 2 g fiber; 3 g pro.; 60 g Folate; 0 mg Pyridoxine (Vit. B6); 1mg Niacin; 30 mg calcium; 234 mg Potassium; 0 g Cobalamin (Vit. B12); 99 mg sodium, 6 mg vit. C; 826 IU Vit. A; 0 mg Riboflavin; 3 mg iron, 0 mg Thiamin Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

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Phone: 920.568.5000 | www.forthealthcare.com