Health365 eNews
December 2014 • Volume 6, Issue 12

Handwashing: Tips for Patients, Family, and Friends

Germs are everywhere around us. Normally, we live with germs without getting sick. In certain circumstances, harmful germs cause us to get sick with an infection. Or, we can spread harmful germs to others and cause them to get sick. Keeping your hands clean is the best way to prevent getting or spreading germs that cause infection. Wash your hands with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand cleaner.


Read more

Germs are everywhere around us. Normally, we live with germs without getting sick. In certain circumstances, harmful germs cause us to get sick with an infection. Or, we can spread harmful germs to others and cause them to get sick. Keeping your hands clean is the best way to prevent getting or spreading germs that cause infection. Wash your hands with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand cleaner.

When to Clean Your Hands: For Patients

In the hospital, you can come in contact with many harmful germs. To help prevent infection, wash your hands often, especially:

  • After using the bathroom
  • Before and after eating
  • After coughing or sneezing
  • After using a tissue
  • After touching or changing a dressing or bandage
  • After touching any object or surface that may be contaminated

If you don’t have access to soap and water, use an alcohol-based hand gel containing at least 60% alcohol. These products kill most germs and are easy to use. But use soap and water, not hand gel, if your hands are visibly dirty.

When to Clean Your Hands: For Family and Friends

When visiting or caring for a loved one, washing your hands or using an alcohol-based hand cleaner can help stop germs from spreading. Wash your hands:

  • Before entering and after leaving the patient’s room.
  • As soon as you remove gloves or other protective clothing.
  • After changing a dressing or bandage.
  • After any contact with blood or other body fluids.
  • After touching or changing the patient’s bed linen or towels.

Many hospitals have sinks or gel dispensers right outside patient rooms. If not, carry a bottle of alcohol-based hand gel with you, and use it every time you visit. Use soap and water, not alcohol-based hand gels, if your hands are visibly dirty.

Tips for Good Handwashing

Here are some suggestions to follow:

  • Use warm water and plenty of soap. Work up a good lather.
  • Clean the whole hand, under your nails, between your fingers, and up the wrists.
  • Wash for at least 15 seconds to 20 seconds. Don’t just wipe. Scrub well.
  • Rinse, letting the water run down your fingers, not up your wrists.
  • Dry your hands well. Use a paper towel to turn off the faucet and open the door.

Time Matters

The longer you wash your hands, the more germs you’ll remove. Most people wash their hands for 6 seconds to 7 seconds. But at least 15 seconds are needed to remove germs. Singing “Happy Birthday” or the “Alphabet Song” are examples of how long 15 seconds would be. To protect yourself and others from infection, washing for 30 seconds is best.

How to Use an Alcohol-Based Hand Cleaner

Alcohol-based hand cleaners may kill more germs than soap and water. Use them when your hands aren’t visibly dirty. For best results, follow these steps:

  • Choose a gel or spray that contains at least 60 percent alcohol. Products with less alcohol may not kill germs.
  • Spread about a tablespoon of cleaner in the palm of one hand.
  • Rub your hands together briskly, cleaning the backs of your hands, the palms, between your fingers, and up the wrists.
  • Rub until the cleaner is gone, and your hands are completely dry.

How Do Antibacterial Soaps and Alcohol-Based Hand Cleaners Differ?

Antibacterial soaps:

  • Come in liquid or bar form and are used with water
  • Are no better at removing germs than plain soap

Alcohol-based hand cleaners:

  • Come in gels or sprays that don’t need water
  • Are as or more effective than washing with soap and water
Hide

Working Out May Help Counteract Holiday Eating

Stuffing yourself with too many holiday goodies? Exercising daily might reduce the harmful effects to your health, according to a small new study.

Previous research has shown that even a few days of consuming far more calories than you burn can damage your health.

The new study included 26 healthy young men who were asked to overeat and who either were inactive or exercised on a treadmill for 45 minutes a day. Daily calorie intake increased by 50 percent in the inactive group and by 75 percent in the exercise group. That meant they had the same net daily calorie surplus, said the researchers at the University of Bath, in England.


Read more

Stuffing yourself with too many holiday goodies? Exercising daily might reduce the harmful effects to your health, according to a small new study.

Previous research has shown that even a few days of consuming far more calories than you burn can damage your health.

The new study included 26 healthy young men who were asked to overeat and who either were inactive or exercised on a treadmill for 45 minutes a day. Daily calorie intake increased by 50 percent in the inactive group and by 75 percent in the exercise group. That meant they had the same net daily calorie surplus, said the researchers at the University of Bath, in England.

After just one week of overeating, all the participants had a significant decline in blood sugar control. Not only that, their fat cells activated genes that result in unhealthy changes to metabolism and that disrupt nutritional balance.

These negative effects, however, were much lower in those who were doing daily exercise, according to the study, which was published Dec. 15 in The Journal of Physiology.

“Our research demonstrates that a short period of overconsumption and reduced physical activity leads to very profound negative changes in a variety of physiological systems,” study co-author Jean-Philippe Walhin said in a journal news release. “But a daily bout of exercise stops most of these negative changes from taking place.”

And holidays often mean people are eating more and exercising less, another researcher said.

“If you are facing a period of overconsumption and inactivity, which is probably quite common around Christmastime, then our study shows that a daily bout of exercise will prevent many of the negative changes from taking place even though you are gaining weight,” study senior author Dylan Thompson said in the news release.

“The effects are obvious, but the underlying causes will need further study to be determined,” he said. “The findings are likely to apply to other groups, like older adults and women, and perhaps to lesser amounts of [exercise].”

Hide

Safety for Snow Sports

Whether you’re heading for the mountain to ski or just taking your sled to the hill, you can enjoy a great day out and get some exercise at the same time.

The American College of Sports Medicine recommends minimizing skiing injuries by getting in shape pre-season, taking lessons to improve skills and understand the outdoor conditions, and wearing properly adjusted equipment.


Read more

Whether you’re heading for the mountain to ski or just taking your sled to the hill, you can enjoy a great day out and get some exercise at the same time.

The American College of Sports Medicine recommends minimizing skiing injuries by getting in shape pre-season, taking lessons to improve skills and understand the outdoor conditions, and wearing properly adjusted equipment.

 

Wear helmets for all snow sports to stay safe. The rest of your winter sports outfit should include many layers, gloves or mittens, and a hat so you can stay warm no matter which of these sports you take part in:

  • Alpine skiing.Downhill skiing works your leg muscles, so it’s a good idea to get in shape before you ski. Observe the rules of the slopes and know when to yield to oncoming skiers. Boots and bindings should be appropriately set, adjusted, and maintained. Warm up slowly before completing more strenuous runs. Stay on marked trails.
  • Cross-country skiing.Cross-country skis are longer and narrower than their alpine cousins. Before you put on your skis, make sure to stretch your arms and legs. Ensure equipment is properly maintained and adjusted.
  • The number of snowboarders is climbing. Wrist injuries are a common snowboarding risk, so consider wrist guards. If you’re just starting out, take a lesson with a qualified instructor at the ski area.
  • Although you may view sledding as a child’s pastime, it can get your heart rate going. Walking back up a hill is great exercise, and you get the reward of a sled run, plus a great time with your family or friends. Do not sled head-first; instead, sit in a forward-facing position. Make sure that the hill does not end in a potentially dangerous area such as a street, parking lot, or body of water. Make sure there are no poles, trees, or other objects at the end of the run.
  • Snow toys.Snow toys let anyone have a good time on the slopes. Many ski mountains offer snow tubing—it’s like sledding with a lift. Some mountains rent snow bikes and scooters that can put you on the slopes in new ways.
Hide

Snow Shoveling Tips


The Best New Year's Resolutions Are Those You Can Keep

You’ll be more likely to stick to your New Year’s resolutions if you establish realistic and achievable goals, an expert suggests.

Too many people try to do too much too fast and set unattainable goals, which simply sets them up for failure, according to Luis Manzo, executive director of student wellness and assessment at St. John’s University in New York.


Read more

You’ll be more likely to stick to your New Year’s resolutions if you establish realistic and achievable goals, an expert suggests.

Too many people try to do too much too fast and set unattainable goals, which simply sets them up for failure, according to Luis Manzo, executive director of student wellness and assessment at St. John’s University in New York.

“There is no sense in making a resolution to wake up every morning at 5 a.m. and run five miles if you know you are not a morning person and you have never run more than a mile in your life. Such a goal will just demoralize you when you are unable to stick to it,” he said in a university news release.

“Rather, play to your strengths, select goals that you can do and that work for you,” Manzo suggested. “Maybe a more realistic goal is running after work for 20 minutes two days during the week and once on the weekend for 25 minutes. Start small, build your confidence and your motivation will skyrocket.”

He offered a number of other suggestions to help you stick with your resolutions, including:

  • Set aside time each day to work on your goals. For example, if you want to exercise, put it in your calendar. Be sure to factor in the time you need to get to the gym, shower and get dressed.
  • Make your resolution part of your routine. The more you do this, the easier it will be to achieve your goal. For example, if you want to connect more with family and friends, make it a habit to call them on a certain night of the week.
  • Write your goals down and make them public. This will make you more accountable.
  • Surround yourself with people who are supportive of your goals. Or you can set goals with a friend so that you can encourage each other. For example, if you plan to write a book, find a friend who has the same goal and agree to share your progress and give each other feedback once a week.
Hide

As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

News

Santa & Mrs. Claus visit Fort HealthCare

Blood Center of Wisconsin

Please join us at Fort Memorial Hospital on December 15th from 11:30a-4:30p for a blood drive put on by the Blood Center of Wisconsin. Every donor will receive a “Thank you” t-shirt.

Please visit www.bcw.edu/FortHealthCare or call 877-BE-A-HERO for an appointment.  Call Bridget Monahan at 920-568-5403 for more information.


Read more
Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
December 18 AHA HEARTSAVER CPR/AED
December 3 AHA HEARTSAVER FIRST AID/CPR/AED
December 2 AQUA ZUMBA®
December 22 BOOT CAMP
December 18 BOOT CAMP
December 16 BOOT CAMP
December 22 CARDIO KICKBOXING
December 18 CARDIO KICKBOXING
December 19 CARDIO KICKBOXING EXPRESS
December 29 CONTINUING YOGA
December 22 CORE, BALANCE AND STRETCH
December 22 FORM AND FUNCTION
December 2 HEALTHY-STEPS
December 18 LOWER BODY SCULPT
December 30 NO NONSENSE, LOW-IMPACT WORKOUT
December 31 RED CROSS BABYSITTING
December 19 SKINNY ARMS EXPRESS
December 17 STEP AEROBICS
December 16 UPPER BODY SCULPT
December 31 YOGA EXPRESS
Recipes

Recipe: Mexican Style Turkey Soup

Ingredients

Nonstick cooking spray

1 cup chopped onion

1 large red sweet pepper, chopped

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon chili powder

1/2 teaspoon paprika

5 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth

1 1/2 cups peeled, cubed winter squash

1 large tomato, chopped

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

2 cups chopped cooked turkey or chicken (about 10 ounces)

1 cup loose-pack frozen whole kernel corn

2 tablespoons snipped fresh cilantro



Read more

Ingredients

Nonstick cooking spray

1 cup chopped onion

1 large red sweet pepper, chopped

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon chili powder

1/2 teaspoon paprika

5 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth

1 1/2 cups peeled, cubed winter squash

1 large tomato, chopped

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

2 cups chopped cooked turkey or chicken (about 10 ounces)

1 cup loose-pack frozen whole kernel corn

2 tablespoons snipped fresh cilantro

 

directions

Coat an unheated Dutch oven with nonstick cooking spray. Preheat over medium heat. Add onion and sweet pepper to hot Dutch oven. Cook about 5 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in cumin, chili powder, and paprika; cook and stir for 30 seconds.

Add chicken broth, squash, tomato, salt, and black pepper. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and simmer about 20 minutes or until squash is tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in turkey or chicken, corn, and cilantro; heat through. Makes 6 servings.

Nutrition

Servings Per Recipe: 6

PER SERVING: 153 cal., 3 g total fat (1 g sat. fat), 35 mg chol., 615 mg sodium, 15 g carb. (3 g fiber), 17 g pro.

Recipe from ‘Diabetic Living’

Hide
©2016 Fort HealthCare | 611 Sherman Avenue East Fort Atkinson, WI 53538
Phone: 920.568.5000 | www.forthealthcare.com