Health365 eNews
September 2015 • Volume 8, Issue 8

Healthy Foods for the Whole Family

Now you have healthy food choices in your house. How do you get your family to eat them? Kids can be picky eaters. And they may resist new tastes. But your whole family can learn to eat healthy foods together.


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Getting kids to try new foods
Kids may not want to eat foods that are new to them. That’s normal. But forcing kids to eat can lead to fighting. It also makes parents and kids feel bad about food. How can you encourage your child to try new tastes?

  • Kids often say “I don’t like it!” without even trying a food. To help your child get used to new foods, serve only a very small amount. Ask your child to at least taste it. Don’t force him or her to eat it. But do eat the new food yourself.
  • It may take a long time for your child to feel OK with a new food. You might have to serve a new food ten or more times before your child accepts it. Don’t give up. Over time, the food will be more familiar to your child.
  • Don’t overwhelm your child with too many new things at once. Try only one new food at a time until your child becomes comfortable with it.

healthy-family

Now you have healthy food choices in your house. How do you get your family to eat them? Kids can be picky eaters. And they may resist new tastes. But your whole family can learn to eat healthy foods together.

One meal for the whole family
The whole family should be offered the food you make for each meal. You don’t have to give in to a picky eater’s demands. You’re not a short-order cook, so don’t make different foods for each person.

  • Serve the new food to each family member. If your child doesn’t want to eat it, that’s OK. Put your child’s portion of food in the fridge for when he or she is hungry later.
  • Your child might not be ready to eat a new food. So also serve at least one healthy food that your child is familiar with as part of each meal.

Don’t reward kids for healthy eating
Have you ever offered your child dessert for trying a new vegetable at dinner? This can make kids think that a sweet food is better than a healthy one. Don’t bribe your child to try new foods. Instead, ask your child to taste the new food, and keep serving it until it becomes familiar.

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Making Changes to Avoid Heart Disease

Your heart is a vital organ that keeps your body functioning. Unfortunately, many people don’t treat it that way. They may not realize that their daily habits and lifestyle can overwork and damage their hearts. So, take care of your heart and yourself. Start by making the following lifestyle changes.


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Get smoke-free
Nicotine causes blood vessels to narrow. This makes it hard for blood to reach your heart muscle and temporarily raises blood pressure. The carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke lessens the oxygen that gets to the heart. That’s why smokers have twice the risk of heart attacks compared to nonsmokers. So, if you smoke, think about quitting. Talk with your doctor about ways to quit. And, try to avoid secondhand smoke. It is also bad for your heart.

Eat heart-friendly foods
Eating fatty foods plays a part in the buildup of fat in your arteries. This can lead to blocked arteries of your heart and to the risk of a heart attack. You should limit fatty meats, whole-milk products, egg yolks, and fried foods. Instead, choose nonfat milk or low-fat dairy products. In addition, choose healthier cooking oils made with unsaturated fats, such as canola and olive oils. But since they are fat, use them in limited amounts. Also, try to eat 2 cups of fruit and 2.5 cups of vegetables daily. They’re good for you, and they fill you up.

Set exercise goals
Exercise gets your heart pumping. This helps your body use oxygen better and makes your heart stronger. It can also decrease your blood pressure and the amount of fat in your blood. Start your exercise program slowly, especially if you haven’t been active for a while. Begin with short sessions, such as 10-minute walks. Gradually increase the length of your workouts to at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. Be sure to talk with your doctor before starting an exercise program.

Watch your blood pressure
Make sure your blood pressure is in the healthy range or under control. Blood pressure is the force against the walls of your blood vessels as blood flows through them. The harder your heart works, the greater your risk for having a heart attack.

Making smart lifestyle choices like eating a diet low in sodium, exercising regularly, avoiding tobacco, reducing stress, and limiting alcohol, will decrease your risk of developing high blood pressure.

Watch your weight
The American Heart Association (AHA) considers overweight and obesity to be major risk factors for heart disease. If you are overweight, losing weight can decrease your risk. Reaching or maintaining an ideal weight also helps lower your blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Reduce stress
Continued and elevated stress has been consistently linked to health problems, including an increased risk for heart disease and cardiac death or death from heart disease. Anger is tightly linked with risk of cardiac death. Common ways of dealing with stress, such as overeating and smoking, can further harm your heart. Try to keep your stress low by exercising, sharing your concerns with friends and family, and making some quiet time for yourself each day. Spending 15 to 20 minutes every day doing something you enjoy is a simple, but effective, step toward a less stressful life.

The AHA recommends regular screening for your risk for heart disease beginning at age 20. Screening includes measuring blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, and pulse each regular health care visit or at least every 2 years. Getting a cholesterol profile every 5 years for normal-risk people is also recommended.

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Maintaining Weight Loss

While losing weight is difficult for many people, it is even more challenging to keep the weight off. Most people who lose a large amount of weight have regained it 2 to 3 years later. One theory about regaining lost weight is that people who decrease their caloric intake to lose weight experience a drop in their metabolic rate, making it increasingly difficult to lose weight over a period of months. A lower metabolic rate may also make it easier to regain weight after a more normal diet is resumed. For these reasons, extremely low calorie diets and rapid weight loss are discouraged.


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While losing weight is difficult for many people, it is even more challenging to keep the weight off. Most people who lose a large amount of weight have regained it 2 to 3 years later. One theory about regaining lost weight is that people who decrease their caloric intake to lose weight experience a drop in their metabolic rate, making it increasingly difficult to lose weight over a period of months. A lower metabolic rate may also make it easier to regain weight after a more normal diet is resumed. For these reasons, extremely low calorie diets and rapid weight loss are discouraged.

Losing no more than 1/2 to 2 pounds per week is recommended. Incorporating long-term lifestyle changes are required to increase the chance of successful long-term weight loss.

Weight loss to a healthy weight for a person’s height can promote health benefits such as lower cholesterol and blood sugar levels, lower blood pressure, less stress on bones and joints, and less work for the heart. Thus, it is vital to maintain weight loss to obtain health benefits over a lifetime.

Keeping extra weight off requires effort and commitment, just as losing weight does. Weight loss goals are reached by a combination of changes in diet, eating habits, exercise, and, in extreme circumstances, bariatric surgery.

Weight loss maintenance strategies

The strategies that encourage weight loss also play an important role in maintenance:

  • Support systems used effectively during weight loss can contribute to weight maintenance. According to the National Weight Control Registry, 55% of registry participants used some type of program to achieve their weight loss.
  • Physical activity plays a vital and essential role in maintaining weight loss. Studies show that even exercise that is not rigorous, such as walking and using stairs, has a positive effect. Activity that uses 1,500 to 2,000 calories per week is recommended for maintaining weight loss. Adults should try to get at least 40 minutes of moderate to vigorous level physical activity at least 3 to 4 times per week.
  • Diet and exercise are vital strategies for losing and maintaining weight. Ninety-four percent of the registrants in the National Weight Control Registry increased their physical activity.
  • Once the desired weight has been reached, the gradual addition of about 200 calories of healthy, low-fat food to daily intake may be attempted for one week to see if weight loss continues. If weight loss does continue, additional calories of healthy foods may be added to the daily diet until the right balance of calories to maintain the desired weight has been determined. It may take some time and record keeping to determine how adjusting food intake and exercise levels affect weight.

Continuing to use behavioral strategies is necessary to maintaining weight. Be aware of eating as a response to stress and use exercise, activity, or meditation to cope instead of eating.

A temporary return to old habits does not mean failure. Paying renewed attention to dietary choices and reverting to exercise can help sustain behaviors that maintain weight loss. Identifying situations such as negative moods and interpersonal difficulties and incorporating alternative methods of coping with such situations rather than eating can prevent relapses to old habits.

Weight cycling

Weight cycling is losing and regaining weight multiple times. Some studies suggest that weight cycling, also called “yo-yo dieting,” may result in some health risks, such as high blood pressure, gallbladder disease, and high cholesterol. However, these studies are not true for everybody. The best strategy is to avoid weight cycling and to maintain healthy weight through a commitment to increased physical activity and healthy eating.

One myth about weight cycling is that a person who loses and regains weight will have more difficulty losing weight again and maintaining it compared to a person who has not gone through a weight-loss cycle. Most studies show that weight cycling does not affect the rate at which the body burns fuel and a previous weight cycle does not influence the ability to lose weight again. In addition, weight cycling does not increase the amount of fat tissue or increase fat distribution around the stomach.

Always consult your doctor for more information.

To learn about ways to begin your weight loss journey, Visit: FortHealthCare.com/wmp

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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

New Start, New You!

Summer is winding down and the kiddos are heading off to school again. The weather is turning and seasons are beginning to change. Most people work towards better health, loosing weight in the summer, and then once fall rolls around people tend to forget about these goals…right? If this screams you, you’re not alone! Everyone tends to get beach body ready for the Summer, and slower moving in the colder months. Well what if instead of slowing down, we picked it back up again! There is truly so much to do in the Fall months that can still be easily done outside.


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News

Fort HealthCare’s Fifth Annual Rock the Walk Coming Soon!

Rock the Walk is Fort HealthCare’s free, eight-week, physical activity challenge that invites all community members and employees of local businesses to invest in their health and compete for great prizes. Fort HealthCare is on a mission to improve the health and well-being of our communities. Let’s band together to rock our fitness goals this fall as we have the potential to be the healthiest in the state of Wisconsin!


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Rock the Walk 2015 web image

Rock the Walk is Fort HealthCare’s free, eight-week, physical activity challenge that invites all community members and employees of local businesses to invest in their health and compete for great prizes. Fort HealthCare is on a mission to improve the health and well-being of our communities. Let’s band together to rock our fitness goals this fall as we have the potential to be the healthiest in the state of Wisconsin!

This year’s goal is to achieve at least 150 minutes of physical activity each week, as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – walking, biking, swimming, or even gardening – whatever activity you choose as long as it gets your heart pumping.

Weekly and grand prizes will be awarded for complete participation. Prizes include $25 Visa gift cards, home gym equipment, gift certificates, a Fit Bit Surge, and an Apple Watch. You’re not going to want to miss this!

Rock the Walk kicks off on Tuesday, September 29th. Sign-up opens on Tuesday, September 8th for all players – returning players will log in at FortHealthCare.MyCernerWellness.com and new players will visit FortHealthCare.com/RockTheWalk to fill out the pre-registration form.

More information about the challenge is found at FortHealthCare.com/RockTheWalk.

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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.

Weight-Loss Surgery Seminar: FortHealthCare.com/Bariatrics
Free Health Screening: FortHealthCare.com/Screenings

Health, Training & Fitness Classes
Aqua Zumba®
Body Blast
Brother, Sister: Sibling-to-Be
Glutes & Abs
Group Strength
Healthy-Steps
Movin’ and Losin’
Low-Impact Workout
On My Own at Home
Skinny Arms Express
Yoga
Zumba®

American Heart Association
AHA ACLS
AHA Heartsaver
Basic Life Support

Healthcare Provider Courses
Critical Care Classes
Pediatric Advanced Life Support

Three Ways to Register:
Online @ FortHealthCare.com/Classes
Call (920) 568-5475
Visit the Registration Desk at Fort Memorial Hospital in Fort Atkinson

Recipes

New York Strip Steak Salad

Serves 4 — Without the salad dressing, each serving contains about 270 calories, 28 g protein, 14 g fat, 75 mg cholesterol, 4 g fiber, 94 mg sodium, and 9 g carbohydrates.



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(Gluten-Free, Gout-Friendly)

Ingredients

  • A 3-ounce serving of the best steak possible is the centerpiece of this large salad. Cook the steak on an indoor, two-sided contact electric grill.
  • About 1 pound New York strip steak, about 1 inch thick
  • 6 cups shredded romaine lettuce
  • 1 small cucumber, peeled, seeded, and chopped
  • 4 radishes, sliced
  • 2/3 cup slivered red onion
  • 1 cup halved grape tomatoes
  • 2 ribs celery, sliced
  • 2 cups steamed and chilled broccoli florets

Directions

Heat grill to high. Rub a New York strip steak with crushed black pepper. Grill steak to desired doneness—about five minutes for rare (internal temperature of about 130 degrees) to eight minutes for well-done (160 degrees). Let steak rest before slicing.

Arrange vegetables on four dinner plates. Spray lightly with olive oil and vinegar or use a light bottled vinaigrette dressing. Slice steak on a diagonal, trimming any fat. Divide equally among salad plates. Top with herbed horseradish cream sauce and serve.

Serves 4 — Without the salad dressing, each serving contains about 270 calories, 28 g protein, 14 g fat, 75 mg cholesterol, 4 g fiber, 94 mg sodium, and 9 g carbohydrates.

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Herbed Horseradish Cream Sauce

Serves 4 — Each serving contains about 23 calories, less than 1 g protein, 2 g fat, 6 mg cholesterol, less than 1 g fiber, 19 mg sodium, and 1 g carbohydrates.



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Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup low-fat sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
  • 1 tablespoon parsley, cilantro, or other fresh herb

Directions

Mix all ingredients in a small bowl. Drizzle on steak.

Serves 4 — Each serving contains about 23 calories, less than 1 g protein, 2 g fat, 6 mg cholesterol, less than 1 g fiber, 19 mg sodium, and 1 g carbohydrates.

To make this recipe gluten-free, use only spices or condiments that are gluten-free. Read food labels carefully and contact the company if you have any questions.

This recipe is gout-friendly because it contains some food moderate in purines. Meat, poultry, and fish intake should be limited to 1-2 servings per day

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