Health365 eNews
September 2014 • Volume 5, Issue 2

Heart Healthy Eating

Eating less junk food and adding more nutritious food to your diet are simple changes that can make a significant improvement in your nutrition and health.


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Eating less junk food and adding more nutritious food to your diet are simple changes that can make a significant improvement in your nutrition and health.

February is heart month – celebrate by taking advantage of these 12 tips for heart healthy eating.

  1. Plan and eat 3 healthy meals per day or about every 4 – 5 hours, choose healthy snacks between meals if necessary.
  2. Increase fresh fruits and vegetables, they give volume without a lot of calories.
  3. Eat breakfast – it will increase your metabolism as much as 25%.
  4. Avoid late night eating as you have little time to burn up these calories and they are more likely to turn into fat.
  5. Eat moderately, practice portion control.
  6. Eat slowly, listen to body cues, quit eating when you feel full.
  7. Reduce carbohydrate choices per meal.
  8. Eating small amounts of protein with meals helps satisfy your appetite for longer periods of time. Add peanut butter or nuts, low fat meat and cheese to meals and snacks. Try to keep total protein or meat intake to no more than 6 oz. per day.
  9. Choose whole grain foods which add fiber and may help lower your cholesterol and blood sugar.
  10. Use vegetable fats and avoid animal fats, use fats sparingly.
  11. Read labels for calorie, carbohydrate and fat content per serving.
  12. Exercise daily – walk, swim, bike, dance, take an aerobics class, etc.

In celebration of heart month, join the party in the Fort HealthCare Cardiac Rehab department on Thursday, February 21! A variety of free activities will be offered, including; wellness screenings, fitness equipment training and a cooking demonstration. All events are open to the public.

Find out how healthy your heart is by taking this simple quiz!

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Healthy Strategies for Weight Loss

Long-term success at weight loss requires a balance between diet and physical activity. Losing one-half to two pounds per week by eating better and exercising more is the best way to lose weight and keep it off.


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Long-term success at weight loss requires a balance between diet and physical activity. Losing one-half to two pounds per week by eating better and exercising more is the best way to lose weight and keep it off.

Before you begin a weight-loss program, talk with your health care provider. He or she may give you an exercise stress test to see how your heart responds to increased physical activity. You also may want to consult a registered dietitian about a menu based on your weight-loss goals and food preferences.

Learn about food labels
A sensible goal for weight loss is to lose a pound a week. To do this you need to eat 500 fewer calories or burn 500 more calories per day than you normally do, which works out to a drop of 3500 calories per week to equal one pound. One step to cutting back on calories is to pay attention to food labels when selecting foods at the supermarket. Choosing foods that are low in calories and/or low in fat can help you meet your daily calorie goal.

Some food labels can be confusing. Just because a product says it’s low-fat or low-carb doesn’t mean that it’s low in calories or is healthy. Food labeling is regulated by the FDA and is required for most prepared foods, including breads, cereals, canned and frozen foods, snacks, desserts, and drinks.

Here are some common food label terms:

  • Fat-free – Less than 0.5 gram of fat per serving
  • Low-fat – Fewer than 3 grams of fat per serving
  • Reduced or less fat – At least 25 percent less fat than the full-fat version
  • Lite products – A product with fewer calories than the regular version; the sodium content is 50 percent less than the regular version; or the food is clearer in color.
  • Calorie-free – Fewer than 5 calories per serving
  • Low-calorie – Fewer than 40 calories per serving
  • Reduced or fewer calories – At least 25 percent fewer calories per serving than the regular version

The food labels also list the number of calories per serving, and the amount of calories that come from fat, carbohydrate or protein. It’s important to note the serving size on the label when determining the number of calories you’re eating.

Start to exercise
Exercise is the other key component in losing weight. Physical activity can help to control weight loss by burning up excess calories that would otherwise be stored as fat.

Your weight is regulated by the number of calories you eat and use. Therefore, you gain weight when you eat more calories than you use, and you lose weight when you burn more calories than you store.

Playing in the yard actively with your kids, mowing the lawn with a push mower, and raking leaves are moderate-intensity activities. On their own, they don’t burn many calories, but when a combination of such activities lasts at least 60 minutes a day, they can make a difference.

More strenuous activities burn more calories than moderate ones. A brisk walk, swimming, and riding a bicycle are all good weight-loss activities.

For you to gain maximum health benefits from physical activity, your exercise program should include:

  • Aerobic activity for 30 to 60 minutes most days of the week
  • Strengthening activities, such as weight training
  • Flexibility exercises, such as stretching

Losing weight doesn’t, and shouldn’t, mean starvation. Losing weight in a healthy way consists of eating better and being more physically active. And it should be tolerable, and perhaps even fun.

A great way to kick-off your weight-loss journey is to join the 2013 Slimdown Challenge! Team up with family, friends and co-workers to slimdown and win valuable prizes! For a list of fitness and nutrition classes available through Fort HealthCare, visit: www.FortHealthCare.com/Classes.

Fort HealthCare’s Nutrition Services program is for anyone who has concerns and questions about diet, feeds, foods, growth and development, special diets and healthy eating. For personal nutrition counseling call (920) 568-5453.

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When Sadness Is Seasonal

If you feel depressed during fall and winter months, you may have a form of depression called seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Symptoms of SAD may develop slowly or begin suddenly. The problem usually fades away during the spring and stays away during the summer.


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If you feel depressed during fall and winter months, you may have a form of depression called seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Symptoms of SAD may develop slowly or begin suddenly. The problem usually fades away during the spring and stays away during the summer.

Facts about seasonal affective disorder
Children and teens can have SAD, but it usually starts during young adulthood. SAD that begins in the winter is more common in northern areas of the country that get less natural sunlight. SAD may be related to changes in the brain’s chemicals that occur with fewer daylight hours and less sun exposure. People make larger amounts of the hormone melatonin when days are shorter. This chemical has been linked to depression.

What to look for
SAD can bring depression that ranges from mild to severe. You may also have feelings of hopelessness and guilt. Other symptoms can include:

  • Fatigue
  • Trouble focusing
  • Sleeping more
  • Headaches
  • Changes in appetite
  • Weight gain
  • Irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Less interest in activities that usually make you happy
  • Loss of interest in being social

How is it diagnosed?
Your health care provider will diagnose SAD by asking you certain questions. You will need to discuss your symptoms, how they’re affecting your daily life, and how long you’ve had them. To help pinpoint SAD, your provider will ask if you’ve had these symptoms during the same season or seasons for more than a year. SAD can be confused with other physical or emotional problems, so be sure to describe your symptoms carefully.

Adding light helps
Doctors and mental health experts often advise people with SAD to get more exposure to light. Taking walks outside during the day may help relieve your SAD. Getting more exposure to sunlight through a window may also be suggested.

Your health care provider may also recommend a form of light therapy in which you sit in front of a particularly bright light. Special lamps and light boxes that deliver this type of light are available for treating SAD. You may need to use the light for at least 30 minutes a day during the fall and winter.

In addition, antidepressant drugs and counseling may be helpful in relieving symptoms of SAD.

Managing seasonal affective disorder
If you have SAD, work with your doctor or mental health provider to find the best treatment at the appropriate times of the year. Taking steps to deal with SAD during the seasons when it usually affects you may help better control the symptoms.

If you are having extreme feelings of depression, feel that the pain is too much to bear, or are thinking about suicide, immediately contact your doctor or go to an emergency department.

Fort HealthCare Behavioral Health Center is here for you and your family when you need help. Our convenient location provides a comprehensive outpatient program of assessment, counseling and treatment that is available to help you and those you care about work through mental illness and substance abuse. For appointments, call (920) 563-9542.

If you think you may be suffering from Seasonal Affective Disorder, take this interactive quiz.

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911 Basics: Responding to a Heart Attack

Chest pain could be due to simple indigestion or a heart attack. Knowing what the warning signs of a heart attack are and how to respond could save a life.


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Chest pain could be due to simple indigestion or a heart attack. Knowing what the warning signs of a heart attack are and how to respond could save a life.

The following guidelines can help you make the right decisions and take the right steps when seconds count.

Simple causes of chest pain
Any of these conditions can cause chest pain:

  • Indigestion usually is accompanied by burping, belching, heartburn, nausea and a sour taste in the mouth.
  • A panic attack usually is accompanied by heart palpitations, shortness of breath and anxiety.
  • Chest-wall or muscle pain from exercise or injury can be made worse when the sore area is pressed with a finger.
  • The breathing pain of respiratory infections often can be made worse by coughing and deep breathing.

It is important to know that any of these symptoms also can be present with a heart attack. Do not assume that you are just having indigestion or a panic attack. Get medical help right away.

Heart attack symptoms
The following signs are symptoms of a heart attack. Not all of these warning signs occur in every attack. Seek immediate medical attention if any of these symptoms occur:

  • Uncomfortable pressure, fullness, squeezing or pain in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back.
  • Pain spreading to the shoulders, neck, back, and arms.
  • Chest discomfort with lightheadedness, fainting, sweating, nausea, or shortness of breath.
  • Marked apprehension or sense of impending doom.

Be prepared
Take the following emergency actions ahead of time if you or a family member has a heart condition or is at risk of a heart attack:

  • Know which hospitals in your area provide 24-hour emergency cardiac care. Tell family and friends where they are.
  • Post emergency rescue numbers on each of your phones.
  • Advise family and friends to call for emergency care if chest pain lasts more than a few minutes.

What to do If you suspect someone you’re with is having a heart attack CALL 911. Tell the dispatcher where you are and that someone is having a heart attack. Don’t hang up until you’re told to do so.

While waiting for emergency help to arrive: Help the victim get into a relaxed sitting position, with the legs up and bent at the knees, to ease strain on the heart.

Did you know that the country’s number one killers, a combination of heart attacks and accidents, claim a life every 34 seconds in the United States? Become CPR certified today – classes are offered monthly at Fort Memorial Hospital.

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Cold vs. Flu

When you wake up sneezing, coughing, and have an achy, feverish, can’t move a muscle feeling, how do you know whether you have a cold or the flu? Influenza ("the flu") and the common cold are both respiratory illnesses but they are caused by different viruses.


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When you wake up sneezing, coughing, and have an achy, feverish, can’t move a muscle feeling, how do you know whether you have a cold vs. the flu? Influenza ("the flu") and the common cold are both respiratory illnesses but they are caused by different viruses. Because these two types of illnesses have similar symptoms, it can be difficult to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone.

Colds can make you feel bad for a few days and typically include the following symptoms:

  • Slight to moderate aches and pains, muscle aches and/or chest discomfort
  • Mild fatigue and weakness
  • Stuffy or runny nose is common
  • Sneezing is common
  • Sore throat is common
  • Mild to moderate hacking cough; usually responds to cough medications
  • Typically lasts 3-7 days

Flu symptoms could last a few days to weeks and can also result in serious health problems such as pneumonia and hospitalizations:

  • Fever is present and typically high (102° – 104°) that lasts 3 – 4 days
  • Headache
  • Often severe aches and pains, muscle aches and chest discomfort
  • Moderate to severe fatigue and weakness – can last up to 3 weeks
  • Extreme exhaustion which is very common in the early onset of the illness
  • Sometimes a stuffy or runny nose, sneezing and sore throat
  • A non-productive (dry) cough is typically present and can last up to 14 days

Many people use the term "stomach flu" to describe illnesses with nausea, vomiting or diarrhea. While these symptoms can sometimes be related to the flu, particularly in children, these problems are due to a gastrointestinal virus or bacteria and are rarely the main symptoms of influenza or "the flu".

To protect yourself from any of the common winter ailments, be sure to get a flu vaccination, wash your hands often and stay home if you feel ill.

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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Got Milk? With the right breast pump you will!

At some point in time, almost all mothers have to leave their infant and need to have pumped milk available if they are breastfeeding.  Like most decisions for first-time mothers, purchasing a breast pump can be a daunting task.  With pressure to do what is best for mom and baby, we hope these tips can help you make a purchase you’re comfortable with.


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News

Jefferson County's 2013 New Year Baby Has Arrived

Lucile Alice Bird, daughter of Katie and Ben Bird of Jefferson, arrived at 3:07 p.m. on Tuesday, January 1 at the Fort Memorial Hospital Great Expectations Birthing Center. She weighed exactly 7 pounds, was 19 inches long and was delivered by Christine Chuppa, MD.


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Students Learn the Value of Local Food

Nearly 48 hungry second-graders will learn the value of locally grown and produced food with the new ‘Chef in the Classroom’ program. ‘Chef in the Classroom’ aims to teach the delicious benefits of eating local and is generating excitement among local chefs.


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Fort HealthCare Slimdown Challenge weigh-in begins February 4

It’s been reported that nineteen percent of all New Year’s resolutions made are related to losing weight. If you are one of those nineteen percent or, if perhaps you’ve come to the conclusion that you need to lose weight after the time for resolutions had passed, then Fort HealthCare encourages you to join this year’s version of the successful Slimdown Challenge.


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Heart Month Celebration

In celebration of Heart Month, Fort HealthCare is hosting a free event on Thursday, February 21 from 12:30 to 4 p.m. at Fort Memorial Hospital in the Cardiac Rehabilitation Education Room.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
February 9 Red Cross Babysitting
February 12 AHA BLS Renewal Course
February 15 Blood Drive
February 16 On My Own at Home
February 18 Fort HealthCare Slimdown Challenge Kicks-off!
February 21 Heart Month Celebration
February 22 AHA BLS Renewal Course
February 25 Zumba
February 26 Rusty Hinges
February 26 Zumba
February 27 Zumba
February 28 AHA BLS Renewal Course
March 2 Zumba
March 4 Having Healthy Babies
Recipes

Chicken Enchilada Casserole

Ingredients:
Cooking spray
4 bone-in chicken thighs, skinned
1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro, divided
1 cup frozen corn kernels, thawed
1/3 cup (3 ounces) 1/3-less-fat cream cheese, softened
1/2 teaspoon ground red pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 cups chopped onion, divided
6 garlic cloves, minced and divided
1 cup fat-free, lower-sodium chicken broth
2/3 cup salsa verde
1/4 cup water
2 tablespoons chopped pickled jalapeño pepper
9 (6-inch) corn tortillas
1/4 cup (1 ounce) shredded sharp cheddar cheese



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Ingredients:
Cooking spray
4 bone-in chicken thighs, skinned
1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro, divided
1 cup frozen corn kernels, thawed
1/3 cup (3 ounces) 1/3-less-fat cream cheese, softened
1/2 teaspoon ground red pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 cups chopped onion, divided
6 garlic cloves, minced and divided
1 cup fat-free, lower-sodium chicken broth
2/3 cup salsa verde
1/4 cup water
2 tablespoons chopped pickled jalapeño pepper
9 (6-inch) corn tortillas
1/4 cup (1 ounce) shredded sharp cheddar cheese

Preparation:

  1. Preheat oven to 425°.
  2. Heat a large ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Add chicken to pan; sauté 4 minutes on each side. Place skillet in oven; bake at 425° for 10 minutes or until done. Remove chicken from pan; let stand 15 minutes. Remove meat from bones; shred. Discard bones. Place chicken in a medium bowl. Add 1 1/2 tablespoons cilantro, corn, and next 5 ingredients (through black pepper) to chicken; toss to combine.
  3. Return pan to medium-high heat. Add 1/2 cup onion; sauté 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add 3 garlic cloves; sauté 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Add onion mixture to chicken mixture; stir to combine.
  4. Combine remaining 1 1/2 cups onion, remaining 3 garlic cloves, broth, salsa, 1/4 cup water, and jalapeño in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat; let stand 10 minutes. Carefully pour mixture into a blender; add 2 tablespoons cilantro. Process until smooth.
  5. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add 2 tortillas; cook 1 1/2 minutes on each side. Remove tortillas from pan; repeat procedure with remaining tortillas. Cut tortillas into quarters.
  6. Spread 1/2 cup salsa mixture in the bottom of an 8-inch square glass or ceramic baking dish coated with cooking spray. Arrange 12 tortilla quarters over salsa mixture. Spoon half of chicken mixture over tortillas. Repeat layers, ending with tortillas. Pour remaining salsa mixture over tortillas; sprinkle evenly with cheddar cheese. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes or until bubbly and lightly browned. Top with remaining cilantro.

Nutritional Information:
Amount per serving Calories: 371, Fat: 12.4g, Saturated fat: 5g, Monounsaturated fat: 2.9g, Polyunsaturated fat: 1.8g, Protein: 23.1g, Carbohydrate: 45.3g, Fiber: 5.4g, Cholesterol: 80mg,Iron: 1.5mg, Sodium: 759mg, Calcium: 141mg

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