Health365 eNews
September 2014 • Volume 4, Issue 11

Hospitalists Bring Specialized Care to the Bedside

For patients admitted to Fort Memorial Hospital, being seen by a hospitalist can mean improved outcomes and specialized care.


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For patients admitted to Fort Memorial Hospital, being seen by a hospitalist can mean improved outcomes and specialized care. Through frequent communication with patient’s primary care physicians, hospitalists only treat hospitalized patients and do not have a regular clinic practice. Because of this they are highly experienced in caring for persons with illnesses serious enough to require hospital care.

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Diabetes: The Benefits of Exercise

Exercise can lower your blood sugar level, help you control your weight, improve your circulation, lower your blood pressure, and improve your heart health. It can also boost your mental outlook. Even a small amount of regular activity can greatly improve your health.


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Exercise can lower your blood sugar level, help you control your weight, improve your circulation, lower your blood pressure, and improve your heart health. It can also boost your mental outlook. Even a small amount of regular activity can greatly improve your health.

What Can You Improve with Exercise?

  • Blood sugar: Regular exercise has been shown to improve blood sugar control. Exercise helps your body use insulin.
  • Mental and emotional health: Physical activity relieves stress and helps you sleep better.
  • Heart health: With regular exercise, you can reduce your risk of heart disease and high blood pressure. You can also improve your cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
  • Weight: Exercise helps you lose fat, gain muscle, and control your weight.
  • Health of blood vessels and nerves: Activity helps lower blood sugar. This helps prevent damage to blood vessels and nerves that can cause problems with your brain, eyes, feet, and legs.
  • Finances: If you manage your blood sugar, you may spend less on medical care.

Two Types of Exercise

Two types of exercise help your body use blood sugar. Both types of exercise are recommended for people with diabetes.

  • Aerobic exercise is of rhythmic, repeated, and continuous movements of the same large muscle groups for at least 10 minutes at a time. Examples include walking, bicycling, jogging, swimming, water aerobics, and many sports.
  • Resistance exercise (strength training) is using muscles to move a weight or work against a resistive load. Examples include weightlifting and exercises using weight machines.

A Goal to Shoot For

Your main goal is to become more active. Even a little bit helps. Choose an activity that you like. Walking is one great form of exercise that everyone can do. Talk to your doctor about any limits you may have before starting with an exercise program. Then aim for 30 minutes of activity most days of the week.

Getting Activity into Your Day

Being more active doesn’t have to be hard work. Try these to get more activity into your day:

  • Taking the stairs instead of the elevator
  • Gardening, housework, and yard work
  • Choosing a parking space farther from the store
  • Walking to talk to a colleague instead of calling
  • Taking a 10-minute walk around the block at lunch
  • Walking to a bus stop a little farther from your home or office
  • Walking the dog after dinner

Fort HealthCare is hosting an indoor Diabetes Walk on Monday, November 14 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at Fort Memorial Hospital. This is your chance to get active while learning more about diabetes! To learn more about diabetes and the programs available at Fort HealthCare, visit FortHealthCare.com/Diabetes.

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Caring for the Caregiver

Caregivers come in all shapes and sizes. They can be adult children, spouses, siblings, friends or neighbors, who help with daily activities such as bathing, feeding and clothing.


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Caregivers come in all shapes and sizes. They can be adult children, spouses, siblings, friends or neighbors, who help with daily activities such as bathing, feeding and clothing. The caregiver may be the only person who can take a loved one to doctors’ appointments. The long-distance caregiver may call weekly, help with expenses or support the main caregiver.

According to the National Family Caregivers Association (NFCA), more than 65 million people provide a level of care to a loved one with a chronic disease each year. More than one relative helps out in some families, but most caregivers go it alone. Caregiving can be demanding and time consuming; it may even increase the risk of acquiring stress related disorders.

How to succeed

These tips are drawn from professional, government and charitable groups: the American Society on Aging, the Federal Administration on Aging, The Family Caregiver Alliance, Children of Aging Parents and the NFCA.

Don’t go it alone

  • Ask others for help. Start with family and friends. Keep less engaged family members informed. Set up a family conference, seek suggestions and talk about disagreements.
  • Ask families with similar problems how they handled them.
  • Involve the person you’re caring for. If possible, help the person take responsibility and join in decisions.
  • Learn about your loved one’s condition. Find specialists for information and guidance.
  • Tap local, state and national resources. They can offer help with transportation, nutrition or day care.

Watch for problems
Mental and physical signs of caregiver stress:

  • A lot of anger or fear
  • A tendency to overreact
  • Feeling depressed, isolated or overburdened
  • Thoughts of guilt, shame or inadequacy
  • Taking on more than you can handle
  • Headaches
  • Digestive upsets
  • Weight loss or gain
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Fatigue
  • Illness

Take time out
Be good to yourself. Take time away from caregiving and don’t neglect your personal and professional needs:

  • Get lots of rest and exercise.
  • Enjoy relaxing music.
  • Eat nutritious meals.
  • Visit with friends, plan leisure activities.
  • Do deep breathing.
  • Read a magazine.
  • Don’t abuse alcohol or drugs, or overeat.
  • Keep a sense of humor.
  • Write your feelings in a journal.
  • Do spiritual meditation.
  • Set limits on what you can and cannot do.
  • Realize you’re doing the best you can.
  • Join a support group.
  • Use community resources for help.

Get help
It’s OK not to have all the answers. Seek help when you need it most:

  • Call a support hotline. Just having someone listen may help.
  • Speak with a counselor. A professional can help you understand your situation.
  • Talk with your religious adviser.
  • Attend a support group. Groups can explain your loved one’s condition, ease tension and provide a sense of what’s important.

General assistance

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Common Questions About Breastfeeding

The first weeks of breastfeeding may be the most challenging. It’s normal to have fears and questions. Don’t worry. The two of you will learn what you need to know together. You’ll be surprised how much you and your baby will teach each other.


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The first weeks of breastfeeding may be the most challenging. It’s normal to have fears and questions. Don’t worry. The two of you will learn what you need to know together. You’ll be surprised how much you and your baby will teach each other.

Here are answers to some questions new mothers often ask:

Is My Baby Getting Enough Milk?

When it comes to feeding your baby, what goes in must come out. You can tell how much milk your baby is getting by keeping track of the baby’s diapers:

  • By the first 24 hours after birth: The baby should have 1 to 2 wet diapers and 1 to 2 soiled (poopy) diapers.
  • The second and third day after birth: The baby should have 3 to 4 wet diapers and 2 to 3 soiled diapers.
  • After the first 4 or 5 days: The baby should have at least 5 to 6 wet diapers and 3 to 4 soiled diapers a day.

How Can I Tell When My Baby’s Hungry?

Don’t wait until your baby cries to feed her. Newborns should be nursed as soon as they show any hunger signs. These include:

  • Increased alertness or activity
  • Rooting reflex (nuzzling against your breast)
  • Smacking her lips or opening and closing her mouth
  • Sucking on her hand or fingers
  • Crying

How Often Should I Feed My Baby?

Feed your baby as often and as long as she wants. Make sure you’re nursing every 1-1/2 to 3 hours. Your baby may spend 10–15 minutes or more on each breast. You may need to wake your baby for some feedings. Newborns tend to be very sleepy. But don’t let your baby sleep for more than 3 hours at a time. And if your baby fusses when feeding, don’t worry. Some babies get distracted easily. To calm your baby, choose a quiet place for feeding. It may also help if you breastfeed in the same place in your home each time.

Will I Spoil My Baby?

Infants can’t be spoiled. When your baby needs comfort, food or holding, she’ll try to let you know. When you respond to your baby’s needs, you help her trust you. This is a time to shower your baby with love and attend to her needs.

Why Is My Baby So Hungry?

Babies eat a lot. This is even more true during a growth spurt. Growth spurts usually happen at 2 and 6 weeks of age. They happen again at 3 and 6 months. During these times, your baby will breastfeed more often. Don’t be alarmed. Your baby will not need formula or supplements.

If you are having difficulty breastfeeding, call (920-568-5300) one of our five certified Lactation Consultants to provide counseling. Often, simple adjustments can make a world of difference. Visit FortHealthCare.com/Baby to learn more about how we’re helping you have a healthier baby. Also, breastfeeding mothers and those considering breastfeeding are invited to attend the new breastfeeding mothers support group on Thursday, November 29 from 1:30 to 3 p.m. in the OB Classroom at Fort Memorial Hospital. This is a unique opportunity to get your questions answered, learn new techniques, share experiences and more.

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Holiday Foods May Trigger GERD Symptoms

Holiday foods and feasts can cause trouble for the estimated 30 million Americans with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but there are things they can do to be comfortable and symptom-free, experts advise.


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Holiday foods and feasts can cause trouble for the estimated 30 million Americans with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but there are things they can do to be comfortable and symptom-free, experts advise.

GERD occurs when a faulty valve between the stomach and esophagus allows stomach contents to flow back into the esophagus. Symptoms of GERD include heartburn, acid regurgitation, wheezing, sore throat and cough, according to the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE).

Things that may trigger GERD symptoms include obesity, pregnancy, smoking, excess alcohol use and consumption of fatty foods, tomato-based products, chocolate, peppermint, spearmint, citrus fruits and juices, carbonated beverages, caffeine and coffee.

Answering "yes" to two or more of the following questions may indicate that you have GERD, according to the ASGE:

  • Do you frequently have one or more of the following: Discomfort behind the breast bone that seems to move upward from the stomach? A burning sensation in the back of your throat? A bitter acid taste in your mouth?
  • Do you often have these symptoms after a meal?
  • Do you have heartburn or acid indigestion two or more times a week?
  • Do you find that antacids only provide temporary relief from these symptoms?
  • Are you taking prescription medication to treat heartburn but still having symptoms?

If you suspect you have GERD, seek diagnosis and treatment so that you can enjoy the holidays and every day.

Treatment options include lifestyle modifications, medication, surgery or a combination of methods.

National GERD Awareness Week is Nov. 18 to 24 in the United States. Fort HealthCare provides diagnosis and treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and related conditions. For more information and to find a doctor, visit FortHealthCare.com/GERD.

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Great American Smoke-Out is November 15: Tips to Successfully Quit

The American Cancer Society is marking the 37th Great American Smokeout on November 15 by encouraging smokers to use the date to make a plan to quit, or to plan in advance and quit smoking that day.


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The American Cancer Society is marking the 37th Great American Smokeout on November 15 by encouraging smokers to use the date to make a plan to quit, or to plan in advance and quit smoking that day. By doing so, smokers will be taking an important step towards a healthier life – one that can lead to reducing cancer risk.

Tips for a Successful Quit Smoking Day

You’ve done your homework, made your plan, tossed out all your cigarettes and now the big day is here: Day One of your plan to quit smoking. You’ve probably heard that nicotine withdrawal is unpleasant and that most people need to quit several times before they reach their goal. But the good news is that, if you can make it through this first day and this first week, when nicotine withdrawal symptoms are at their worst, you will be on your way to success.

One of the most important things you can do right now is remind the people around you that today is the day you are quitting cigarettes and ask for their help. This might mean asking some people not to smoke around you, so that you aren’t tempted to give in to a craving.

How you might feel today

You may experience a range of nicotine withdrawal symptoms today or during this first week. It’s not unusual to have four or more of these reactions:

  • Cravings for cigarettes (nicotine)
  • Anger
  • Frustration
  • Irritability
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Weight gain
  • Increased appetite

If your doctor has prescribed nicotine replacement products, such as nicotine patches, be sure to use them as directed to help relieve symptoms. If he or she suggested antidepressants, which are sometimes helpful, make sure you understand how and when exactly to take them.

Getting through tough moments

Here are no- or low-cost strategies for meeting today’s challenges:

  • Plan a new morning ritual. If smoking was a big part of how you started every day, create new positive habits, like making a healthy breakfast from scratch. Ideally the activity should last an hour or more and keep you busy and distracted.
  • Plan activities. Schedule activities that you enjoy (but that you don’t associate with smoking) to stay occupied and avoid feelings of boredom or frustration. It’s OK to bribe yourself a little bit, too—reward yourself after you get through the afternoon without a cigarette by going to the movies or getting a manicure.
  • Lean on others for support. Ask friends and family to help motivate you, and reach out to support groups available both in person and online. Don’t be afraid to contact them—you want to create a network of cheerleaders who will keep you on track.
  • Drive differently. If you smoked in your car—on your way to work or just the supermarket, for example—you might need to change your route, listen to new music, or find another way to drive without smoking. You might even consider joining a carpool or taking a train to shake up your daily commute.
  • Get physical. Taking a walk or jog or engaging in any kind of physical activity that you really like can reduce feelings of anxiety, anger, frustration and stress that are often part of nicotine withdrawal.
  • Fiddle. If you enjoyed the feeling of a cigarette in your hand, find a small object, such as a paperclip, pencil, or even a squishy stress ball, that you can play with instead.
  • Keep your mouth busy. Try chewing sugar-free gum, sucking on hard candy, or chomping on fruits and veggies whenever you get a craving—have all these choices handy at all times.
  • Take a deep breath. Do deep breathing exercises as often as you need them to relieve stress, and every time you exhale, remind yourself that the urge to smoke will pass.
  • Seek out smoke-free distractions. Take advantage of public smoking bans by enjoying smoke-free places in your community. Savor the fresh air filling your lungs.
  • Create a plan to manage triggers. You probably have favorite times and places to smoke or certain stressful (but predictable) events that cause you to want to light up. Plan your day so that you avoid as many of your trigger situations as possible; have an alternative activity you can do when a trigger is unavoidable, such as drinking a glass of water rather than smoking during scheduled coffee breaks.
  • Cut back on alcohol. Not only does alcohol weaken your resolve to follow a number of healthy lifestyle options, it also often acts as a trigger for smoking. In particular, avoid any specific drinks you used to enjoy with a cigarette.
  • Distract yourself. If you find you have time on your hands, keep those hands busy with an interesting book or magazine to read or a puzzle to solve.
  • Know key contacts. If you have a weak moment, call a friend, a loved one, the American Lung Association helpline (800-548-8252), or the National Cancer Institute helpline (877-448-7848) for encouragement so that you do not reach for a cigarette. 

Fort HealthCare has teamed up with the American Lung Association to bring you a self-paced, online and free smoking cessation program. Freedom From Smoking allows 24 -hour access to learning modules and message boards. There are also bi-weekly motivational messages and help lines. If you are thinking about quitting smoking or are in the process, please join this program today.  You provide the commitment, and we provide the tools and assistance. 

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Do You Know Your Blood Type?

Blood is a fluid that flows throughout the body in blood vessels. Blood is needed for life. Blood carries oxygen and nutrients to your organs and tissues and helps remove waste. Blood also helps you fight infections and heal from injuries.


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Blood is a fluid that flows throughout the body in blood vessels. Blood is needed for life. Blood carries oxygen and nutrients to your organs and tissues and helps remove waste. Blood also helps you fight infections and heal from injuries.

Although all blood is made of the same basic elements, not all blood is alike. In fact, there are eight different common blood types, which are determined by the presence or absence of certain antigens – substances that can trigger an immune response if they are foreign to the body. Since some antigens can trigger a patient’s immune system to attack the transfused blood, safe blood transfusions depend on careful blood typing and cross-matching.

The ABO Blood Group System

There are four major blood groups determined by the presence or absence of two antigens – A and B – on the surface of red blood cells:

  • Group A – has only the A antigen on red cells (and B antibody in the plasma)
  • Group B – has only the B antigen on red cells (and A antibody in the plasma)
  • Group AB – has both A and B antigens on red cells (but neither A nor B antibody in the plasma)
  • Group O – has neither A nor B antigens on red cells (but both A and B antibody are in the plasma)

Did you Know?

  • O+ blood is needed more frequently than any other type?
  • O- red blood cells can be given to any patient in need and is the universal blood type?
  • All A-, B- and AB- types together make up less than 10 percent of the population?
  • Only 5 percent of eligible adults donate blood?

BloodCenter of Wisconsin will be hosting a blood screening event at Fort Memorial Hospital on Wednesday, November 7 from 4 to 6 p.m. At this event, BloodCenter staff and volunteers use a self-test kit to learn more about your blood type. You will also learn how your blood donation can save lives. Other health screenings, including blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose and bone density will also take place during this time.

Blood screening is fast, safe and easy and it’s a chance to learn something new about yourself. The screening test provides 90 – 95 percent accuracy. You may find that you have a rare blood type, or perhaps you have a blood type that can help many different people.

This screening is your chance to learn your type and learn how you can save lives.

To make an appointment for any of the screenings offered on Wednesday, November 7 from 4 to 6 p.m., please contact the Fort HealthCare Community Health and Wellness Department at (920) 568-5244.

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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Calming a Crying Baby – The Safe Way

Babies cry. It’s how they know to communicate with the world around them. But when a baby won’t stop crying, it can be frustrating.


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News

Dermatologist Glinert Receives UW Med School Clinical Teacher Award

Fort HealthCare dermatologist Robert Glinert, MD has received the University of Wisconsin Department of Family Medicine Clinical Teacher Award. This award recognizes volunteer faculty members practicing at outpatient clinical rotation sites such as Fort Memorial Hospital for their educational and teaching activities.


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Commitment to Corporate Wellness Award Presented by Fort HealthCare to 3 Local Companies

Being well is made easier when you are surrounded by those who share similar goals and can help make good choices. With this in mind, Fort HealthCare is encouraging businesses and other organizations in the area to promote wellness in the workplace.


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Fort HealthCare Center for Hand Care

It is easy for people to take the full function of their hands for granted. Perhaps thousands of times each day we reach, touch, hold, point and lift with these essential parts of the body. Therefore, any loss of function through injury or disease can devastate lives.


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Fort HealthCare Lake Mills Clinic and Therapy & Sport Center Open House

The Fort Healthcare Lake Mills Clinic and Fort Healthcare Lake Mills Therapy & Sport Center will be hosting an open house event for the public on Saturday, November 10, 2012 between 11a.m. and 1 p.m. The open house will be held at the clinic, located at 200 East Tyranena Park Road in Lake Mills.


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Diabetes Day Indoor Walk Event at Fort HealthCare

Diabetes does not discriminate. It can affect persons of any age, race, or socio-economic status and nearly everyone knows someone who is living with diabetes. To help spread the word regarding treatment and the search for a cure, World Diabetes Day is held each November, which is also American Diabetes Month.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
November 5 AHA Heartsaver Family & Friends CPR
November 6 Healthy Steps
November 7 Having Healthy Babies
November 7 Free Health Screening
November 7 Blood Type Screening
November 8 Brother, Sister: Sibling-to-Be
November 12 Zumba
November 13 Aqua Zumba
November 13 Bladder Control Problems
November 13 Zumba
November 14 Zumba
November 14 World Diabetes Day
November 15 Bladder Control Problems
November 15 Zumba
November 17 AHA Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
November 17 Happiest Baby on the Block
November 17 On My Own at Home
November 17 Red Cross Babysitting
November 17 Zumba
November 19 Boot Camp
November 19 Boot Camp Express
November 19 Cardio Kickboxing
November 19 Cardio Kickboxing Express
November 20 Boot Camp
November 20 Glutes & Abs
November 20 Step Aerobics Express
November 26 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED
November 26 Yoga
November 27 No Nonsense, Low-Impact Workout

November 27 Yoga
November 28 Body Blast
November 28 Glutes & Abs
November 28 Skinny Arms Express
November 28 Step Aerobics
November 28 Yoga Express
November 29 Boot Camp
November 29 Cardio Kickboxing
November 29 Gluten Free: Is It for Me?
November 29 Glutes & Abs
November 29 Step Aerobics Express
November 30 Boot Camp Express
November 30 Cardio Kickboxing Express
December 1 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED
December 4 AHA Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
December 4 Childbirth Preparation
December 5 Having Healthy Babies
December 5 Free Health Screening
Recipes

Roasted Turkey Breast with Cranberry Sauce

Turkey:

1 boneless, skinless turkey breast half
(about 2 1/4 pounds)
3/4 cup nonfat plain yogurt
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar
1 tsp. black peppercorns, crushed
1 tsp. cumin seed, crushed
1 tsp. dried rosemary, crushed
1 tsp. minced fresh ginger
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon



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Turkey:

1 boneless, skinless turkey breast half
(about 2 1/4 pounds)
3/4 cup nonfat plain yogurt
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar
1 tsp. black peppercorns, crushed
1 tsp. cumin seed, crushed
1 tsp. dried rosemary, crushed
1 tsp. minced fresh ginger
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon

Cranberry sauce:
2 cups fresh cranberries
1/2 cup dried apple slices
Grated rind of 1 orange
1 cup orange juice
1/2 cup all-fruit apple butter
3 Tbsp. maple syrup

Rinse turkey with cold water and pat dry with paper towels. Set aside. In a large, nonreactive bowl (plastic, glass or stainless steel), combine yogurt, garlic, vinegar, pepper, cumin, rosemary, ginger and cinnamon. Add turkey and turn to coat evenly. Cover and refrigerate overnight, turning the meat occasionally.

While turkey is marinating, combine cranberries, apples, orange rind and orange juice in a food processor or blender. Process until finely chopped but not pureed. Transfer mixture to a medium saucepan. Add the apple butter and maple syrup. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer uncovered for about 10 minutes. Transfer to serving bowl and allow to cool. Cover and refrigerate until serving time.

To roast turkey, remove from marinade and place in an oven cooking bag. Discard marinade. Roast turkey according to manufacturer’s directions or until internal temperature reaches 170F. Start checking internal temperature after 1 hour.

Remove turkey from cooking bag and let stand for 10 minutes before slicing and serving. Serve with cranberry sauce.

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Phone: 920.568.5000 | www.forthealthcare.com