Health365 eNews
September 2014 • Volume 6, Issue 9

It’s in the Bag: Healthy School Lunches

Children and teens can get their hands on plenty of junk food, fast food, and other treats throughout the day. By sending them off to school with a healthy lunch, you can help ensure that they have at least one chance to fuel their bodies with nutritious options.

The ground rules are simple. Healthy basics are protein, whole grain foods, fruits and vegetables, and low-fat milk or other dairy foods. Good sources of protein are lean meat, such as chicken breast; peanut butter; and beans, including soybeans in the form of fun-to-eat edamame.


Read more

Children and teens can get their hands on plenty of junk food, fast food, and other treats throughout the day. By sending them off to school with a healthy lunch, you can help ensure that they have at least one chance to fuel their bodies with nutritious options.

The ground rules are simple. Healthy basics are protein, whole grain foods, fruits and vegetables, and low-fat milk or other dairy foods. Good sources of protein are lean meat, such as chicken breast; peanut butter; and beans, including soybeans in the form of fun-to-eat edamame.

Packing lunches with creativity

In addition to covering the basics, your kids will love surprises as well as being part of the planning. Try these ideas to pack a lunch that your young students will eat, rather than trade or toss out:

  • Get your children’s input. Kids are more likely to eat their lunch if they help prepare it. Ask your children what foods they prefer in each category, such as fruits and vegetables, and be sure to collect several ideas. Stock up so you’ll have enough ingredients on hand at all times.
  • Bring in some novelty. It’s easy for children to get into a rut, eating the same foods over and over. Take your child with you when you go to the supermarket and make a habit of trying new foods. The produce department offers many kinds of fruits with appealing shapes and textures, like starfruit and pomegranates. Also venture down the international foods aisle, where you’re likely to find unique beans, noodles, sauces, and other options to expand your child’s palate.
  • Prepare lunch with a creative flair. When it comes to feeding your children, you’re up against tough competition. Fast-food chains and snack makers know how to appeal to kids with brightly colored packaging and lots of added sugar. Counter these temptations by tossing fun options into their lunch bags or boxes to make mealtime more interesting. Fill a small, reusable container with honey mustard, barbecue sauce, or ketchup for dipping pieces of chicken or with low-fat ranch dressing for dipping baby carrots. Instead of always stacking sandwiches between two pieces of bread, roll up your fillings in a wrap or dispense with the bread entirely and place shaved turkey breast in a deli-sized slice of cheddar cheese and a lettuce leaf. Instead of packing one large sandwich, consider making a handful of tiny sandwiches on whole-wheat crackers. For a snack, replace chips with apple slices and a small container of almond butter for dipping or popcorn sprinkled with flavorful herbs.
  • Make lunch healthy and safe. Perishable items, such as meats and many cheeses, need to stay cold and shouldn’t linger at room temperature for more than two hours. Place a reusable frozen gel pack or frozen juice box into an insulated lunch box or bag to help keep foods cold. 
Hide

September: National Cholesterol Education Month

Eating for Heart Health – As Easy as 1, 2, 3!

When it comes to nutrition, some simple diet changes can improve your lipid numbers.  Lipids labs are the labs your doctor orders to check the levels of cholesterol, LDL (bad) cholesterol, HDL (good) cholesterol, and your triglycerides.


Read more

Eating for Heart Health – As Easy as 1, 2, 3!

When it comes to nutrition, some simple diet changes can improve your lipid numbers. Lipids labs are the labs your doctor orders to check the levels of cholesterol, LDL (bad) cholesterol, HDL (good) cholesterol, and your triglycerides.

Cholesterol is mostly made in the liver and little comes from our food. It is carried by the LDL particle to each cell of our body and is necessary to make cell walls, hormones, and even bile that breaks down fat and fiber. When we have too much cholesterol or the LDL particle is small and sticky, it forms plaque on our arteries.

HDL cholesterol hauls the excess cholesterol back to the liver to be recycled and acts like a “garbage collector.” It is good to have LOTS of garbage collectors. Most of our HDL is determined by heredity, but weight loss, exercise, and smoking cessation can raise HDL. The only food way to improve HDL is to eat to lower triglycerides.

Triglycerides are also made in the liver. Triglycerides should be below 150. High triglycerides are associated with: low HDL, sticky LDL particles, and insulin resistance (the start of diabetes). We really like low triglyceride levels.

To lower cholesterol and LDL:

1.Eat foods low in HARD fats.Hard fats tell your liver to over-produce cholesterol. Saturated and trans fats literally are hard at room temperature. Saturated fats are mostly from animals. Trans fats are man-made and not only raise cholesterol and LDL but lower the good HDL. Bottom line, the leaner the meat the better and avoid all trans fat foods.

2.Increase fiber in your diet. Especially oat cereals, fruits, vegetables, and legumes will lower blood cholesterol levels, also lowering LDL.

To lower triglycerides:

3.Increase the intake of “good” fats. Even though triglycerides are fat, they are raised with the high intake of refined carbohydrates, high intake of alcohol, or very large meals. They are lowered by adding olive oil, nuts, peanut butter, salmon, and other healthy fats.

To help you know what your lipid numbers mean to your health and to find out more dietary ways to change, ask to see a Registered Dietitian for some good advice.

-Your Fort HealthCare Nutrition Services

Cholesterol in the Blood Facts about cholesterol

Cholesterol is a fat-like, waxy substance that can be found in all parts of your body. It aids in the production of cell membranes, many hormones, and vitamin D. The cholesterol in your blood comes from two sources: the foods you eat and your liver. However, your liver makes all the cholesterol your body needs.

Cholesterol and other fats are transported in your blood stream in the form of spherical particles called lipoproteins. The two most commonly known lipoproteins are low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL).

What is LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol? What is HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol?
Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad" cholesterol, is a type of fat in the blood that contains the most cholesterol. It can contribute to the formation of plaque buildup in the arteries, known as atherosclerosis, which is linked to increased risk of heart attack and stroke. You want your LDL to be low. To help lower it:

  • Avoid foods high in saturated fat, dietary cholesterol, and excess calories
  • Exercise
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Stop smoking
High-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol, helps to remove cholesterol from the blood, preventing the fatty buildup and formation of plaque. You want your HDL to be as high as possible. Some people can raise HDL by:

  • Exercising for at least 30 minutes five times a week
  • Kicking the cigarette habit
  • Avoiding saturated fat intake
  • Decreasing body weight

For others, medicine may be needed. Because raising HDL is complicated, you should work with your physician on a therapeutic plan.

Checking your blood cholesterol level

A cholesterol screening is an overall look at, or profile of, the fats in your blood. Screenings help identify people at risk of heart disease. It is important to have what is called a full lipid profile to show the actual levels of each type of fat in your blood: LDL, HDL, triglycerides, and others. Consult your physician regarding the timing of this test.

What is a healthy blood cholesterol level?

High blood cholesterol is a significant risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Lowering blood cholesterol through increased physical activity, weight loss, smoking cessation, and proper diet lowers that risk. Blood cholesterol, however, is very specific to each individual and, for that reason, a full lipid profile is an important part of your medical history and important information for your physician to have. In general, healthy levels are as follows:

  • LDL-less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) is considered desirable
  • HDL-greater than 40 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl)
  • A total cholesterol level below 200 mg/dl is considered desirable

In some individuals who already have coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or who have an increased number of risk factors for coronary heart disease, a physician may determine that the LDL cholesterol level should be kept lower than 130. Recent studies have shown that those who are at highest risk for a heart attack should lower their LDL cholesterol level to less than 100, and that an LDL cholesterol level of 70 or less may be optimal for those individuals at the very highest level of risk. Always consult your physician for a diagnosis.

What treatments are available for high cholesterol?

Medical treatment may include:

  • Modification of risk factors. Some risk factors that can be changed include lack of exercise and poor dietary habits.
  • Cholesterol lowering medications. . Medications are used to lower lipids (fats) in the blood, particularly low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Statins are a group of antihyperlipidemic medications, and include simvastatin (Zocor), atorvastatin (Lipitor), and pravastatin (Pravachol), among others. Bile acid sequestrants—colesevelam (Welchol), cholestyramine (Questran), and colestipol (Colestid)—and nicotinic acid (niacin) are two other types of medications that may be used to reduce cholesterol levels.

Statistics about cholesterol

Elevated cholesterol is a risk for many Americans. Consider these statistics:

  • According to the American Heart Association, about 99 million American adults have total blood cholesterol levels of 200mg/dl and higher, and of those about 32 million American adults have level of 240 or above.
  • Elevated cholesterol levels early in life may play a role in the development of adult atherosclerosis.
  • According to the American Heart Association, high blood cholesterol that runs in families will affect the future of an unknown (but probably large) number of children.

What are triglycerides?

Triglycerides are another class of fat found in the bloodstream. The bulk of your body’s fat tissue is in the form of triglycerides.

Triglyceride levels and heart disease

The link between triglycerides and heart disease is under clinical investigation. However, many people with high triglycerides also have other risk factors such as high LDL levels or low HDL levels.

What causes elevated triglyceride levels?

A healthy triglyceride level is less than 150 mg/dl. Elevated triglyceride levels may be caused by medical conditions such as diabetes, hypothyroidism, kidney disease, or liver disease. Dietary causes of elevated triglyceride levels may include high intake of alcohol, and foods containing cholesterol, saturated fat, and trans-fat.

Hide

Sports-Related Injuries

Most sports injuries are due to either trauma or overuse of muscles or joints. The majority are caused by minor trauma involving muscles, ligaments, tendons, or bones, including:

  • Contusions (bruises)
  • Sprains
  • Strains
  • Fractures
  • Dislocations

Read more

Most sports injuries are due to either trauma or overuse of muscles or joints. The majority are caused by minor trauma involving muscles, ligaments, tendons, or bones, including:

  • Contusions (bruises)
  • Sprains
  • Strains
  • Fractures
  • Dislocations

What is a contusion?

A contusion (bruise) is an injury to the soft tissue. It is often caused by blunt force such as a kick, fall, or blow. The immediate result will be pain, swelling, and discoloration.

What is a sprain?

A sprain is a stretch or tear of a ligament. Ligaments are flexible bands of fibrous tissue that connect bones to bones, and bones to cartilage. They also hold together the bones in your joints. Sprains often affect the ankles, knees, or wrists.

What is a strain?

A strain is twist, pull or tear of a muscle or tendon, and is often caused by overuse, force, or stretching. A tendon is a tough cord of tissue that connects muscles to bones.

Some examples of strains are:

  • Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis). Lateral epicondylitis, also known as tennis elbow, is characterized by pain in the back side of the elbow and forearm, along the thumb side when the arm is alongside the body with the thumb turned away. The pain is caused by damage to the tendons that bend the wrist backward away from the palm. 
  • Golfer’s or baseball elbow (medial epicondylitis). Medial epicondylitis, also known as golfer’s elbow, is characterized by pain from the elbow to the wrist on the palm side of the forearm. The pain is caused by damage to the tendons that bend the wrist toward the palm. 
  • Lumbar strain. A lumbar strain is an injury to the lower back, which results in damaged tendons and muscles that spasm and feel sore. Trauma of great force can injure the tendons and muscles in the lower back. Pushing and pulling sports, such as weight lifting or football, can lead to a lumbar strain. In addition, sports that require sudden twisting of the lower back, such as basketball, baseball, and golf can lead to this injury.
  • Jumper’s knee. Jumper’s knee, also known as patellar tendonitis, is a condition characterized by inflammation of the patellar tendon, which connects the kneecap to shin bone (tibia). The condition may be caused by overuse of the knee joint, such as frequent jumping on hard surfaces.
  • Runner’s knee. Runner’s knee, also known as patellofemoral stress syndrome, is when the patella, or kneecap, does not move well in the groove of the femur (thigh bone). Runner’s knee may be caused by a structural defect, or a certain way of walking or running.

What is a fracture?

Fractures are breaks in the bone that are often caused by a blow or a fall. A fracture can range from a simple hairline fracture (a thin fracture that may not run through the entire bone) to a compound fracture, in which the broken bone protrudes through the skin. Most fractures occur in the arms and legs.

Stress fractures are weak spots or small cracks in the bone caused by continuous overuse. Stress fractures often occur in the foot or leg after training for gymnastics, running, and other sports. The bones in the midfoot (metatarsals) in runners are especially vulnerable to stress fractures.

What is a dislocation?

A dislocation occurs when extreme force is put on a ligament, allowing the ends of two connected bones to separate. Stress on joint ligaments can lead to dislocation of the joint.

Rehabilitation for sports injuries

A rehabilitation program for sports injuries is designed to meet the needs of the individual patient, depending on the type and severity of the injury. Active involvement of the patient and family is vital to the success of the program.

The goal of rehabilitation after an amputation is to help the patient return to the highest level of function and independence possible, while improving the overall quality of life–physically, emotionally, and socially.

In order to help reach these goals, sports injury rehabilitation programs may include the following:

  • Activity restrictions
  • Physical or occupational therapy
  • Exercise programs to stretch and strengthen the area
  • Conditioning exercises to help prevent further injury
  • Heat or cold applications and whirlpool treatments
  • Applications of braces, splints, or casts to immobilize the area
  • Use of crutches or wheelchairs
  • Pain management techniques
  • Patient and family education

The sports injury rehabilitation team

Rehabilitation programs for sports injuries are usually conducted on an outpatient basis. Many skilled professionals are part of the sports injury rehabilitation team, including any or all of the following:

  • Orthopedist/orthopedic surgeon
  • Physiatrist
  • Physical therapist
  • Occupational therapist
  • Exercise physiologist
  • Sports medicine specialist
  • Athletic trainer
Hide

Exercise During Pregnancy

Regular exercise, with the approval of your doctor or midwife, can often help to minimize the physical discomforts of pregnancy and help with the recovery after the baby is born. There is evidence that physical activity may be especially beneficial for women with gestational diabetes. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, women who exercised and were physically fit before pregnancy can safely continue exercising throughout the pregnancy. Women who were inactive before pregnancy or who have medical or pregnancy complications should consult with their doctor or midwife before beginning any exercise during pregnancy.


Read more

Regular exercise, with the approval of your doctor or midwife, can often help to minimize the physical discomforts of pregnancy and help with the recovery after the baby is born. There is evidence that physical activity may be especially beneficial for women with gestational diabetes. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, women who exercised and were physically fit before pregnancy can safely continue exercising throughout the pregnancy. Women who were inactive before pregnancy or who have medical or pregnancy complications should consult with their doctor or midwife before beginning any exercise during pregnancy.

All women should be evaluated by their doctor or midwife before beginning or continuing an exercise program in pregnancy.

Exercise may not be safe if the pregnant woman has any of the following conditions:

  • Preterm labor in current or past pregnancies
  • Vaginal bleeding
  • Cervical problems
  • Leaking of amniotic fluid
  • Shortness of breath
  • Dizziness and/or fainting
  • Decreased fetal activity or other complications
  • Increased heart rate (tachycardia), although heart rate is typically higher in pregnant women 
  • Certain health problems, such as high blood pressure or heart disease

Types of exercise to avoid during pregnancy:

  • Horseback riding
  • Water skiing
  • Scuba diving
  • High altitude skiing
  • Contact sports
  • Any exercise that can cause a serious fall
  • Exercising on your back after the first trimester (because of reduced blood flow to the uterus)
  • Vigorous exercise in hot, humid weather, as pregnant women are less efficient at exchanging heat
  • Exercise involving the Valsalva maneuver (holding one’s breath during exertion), which can cause an increased intra-abdominal pressure
Hide

As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Jumping Outside The Box

September has made it!

I know people say that Labor Day marks the ‘end of summer’, but I don’t see it that way. After all, it seems like summer just began!

One of my favorite parts of summer is exercising outdoors. I love that the sun is up early in the morning when I run and is out later in the evening.  It is refreshing being able to get out of my office and apartment to spend time in the fresh air and getting a tan. The downside? The smell of fresh doughnuts at local grocery stores in the morning and grills fired up in the evening. Pick your poison.


Read more
News

New Forensic Light Source for SANE Program

The Fort HealthCare Partners Organization recently purchased and donated a forensics Focus LED light source to the Fort Memorial Hospital Sexual Assault Nurse Exam (SANE) Program. The light provides more sensitivity than traditional methods, leading to an increased amount of evidence that can be uncovered during the exam of a victim of domestic or sexual assault.


Read more

Fort Memorial Hospital Cardiopulmonary Rehab Recertified

Fort HealthCare’s Cardiopulmonary Rehab and Wellness staff would like to announce the recertification of their Pulmonary Rehab Program. The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehab (AACVPR) recently confirmed that the program meets the criteria for AACVPR Program Recertification. The program first became certified in 2005 after a rigorous review by the AACVPR National Committee. Each certified program is required to resubmit and apply for recertification every three years.


Read more

Local Boys’ Bake Sale Benefits Hospitalized Children

Just before school let out and summer vacation started for three 10 year old boys, they organized a bake sell for a school picnic at Barrie Elementary School. Vincent Healy, Drew Evans and Brayden Brown sold Cake Pops, Scotcheroos and M&M Cookies. Their bake sale idea was in response to the Fort Atkinson School District GATE Mini-Grant program. 


Read more

Rock the Walk 2014 Registration is Open!

Rock the Walk 2014 is an opportunity for employees of our local businesses and members of our communities to increase physical activity while competing for prizes. The ultimate goal is to improve the health and well-being of our community, as emphasized in Fort HealthCare’s mission. Participants are invited to join their business, their community coalition, or their county to compete in the challenge. 


Read more
Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
September 10 Yoga Express
September 10 Body Blast
September 10 Glutes & Abs
September 10 Lower Body Sculpt
September 10 Skinny Arms Express
September 10 Step Aerobics
September 10 Upper Body Sculpt
September 10 Zumba®
September 11 Boot Camp
September 11 Cardio Kickboxing
September 11 Glutes & Abs
September 11 Lower Body Sculpt
September 11 Brother, Sister: Sibling-to-be
September 12 Beginner Boot Camp
September 12 Cardio Kickboxing Express
September 13 Red Cross Babysitting
September 15 Zumba ®
September 16 Movin’ and Losin’ Families
September 16 Basic ECG Class – Continuing Education
September 17 Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) Renewal Course
September 17 Zumba
September 18 Rock the Walk Eligibility Registration Form Deadline
September 19 Zumba
September 19 Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Providers Renewal Course
September 20 AHA Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
September 21 Critical Care Classes – Continuing Education
September 24 Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Providers Renewal Course
September 24 AHA Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support Renewal Course
September 24 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED
Recipes

Creamy Penne Pasta with Vegetables

September is National Fruit and Vegetable Month! At every meal and for a snack, make sure you incorporate a hearty serving of fruits or vegetables. Visit FruitsandVeggiesMoreMatters.org for all things fruits and veggies. This month’s recipe is featured on Greatist.com as a healthier pasta recipe. Choose wheat noodles, substitute for a healthier sauce, and add veggies for a delicious and nutritious meal tonight!   



Read more

Prep time10 mins

Cook time15 mins

Total time25 mins

Author: Linda Wagner

Recipe type: Dinner

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 box spelt penne pasta
  • 1 zucchini, diced
  • 1 yellow squash, diced
  • 1 yellow onion, diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 12oz plain Greek yogurt
  • 4oz raw goat cheddar, shredded
  • sea salt & fresh cracked pepper
  • several leaves of kale or spinach, torn into tiny pieces

 Instructions

  1. In a large pot with hot water, cook your pasta according to the directions on the box.
  2. While your pasta is cooking prepare your sauce. In a medium skillet over med-high heat add ¼ cup water, minced garlic, diced onion, yellow squash, zucchini, a pinch of sea salt, and pepper and cook for several minutes until soft. Using water eliminates the need for oil or butter. You’ll still have the same great taste but without the added fat! If the pan starts to get dry, simply add more water. Continue to cook for about 10mins or so until veggies get very soft and start to dissolve. If your picky eaters are sensitive to texture, you could also use an immersion blender or food processor to blend.
  3. In a large mixing bowl combine the cooked veggies with the kale or spinach, Greek yogurt and shredded goat cheddar, adding sea salt and pepper to taste as needed. Then stir in your pasta and serve immediately.
  4. Your whole family will love this dish, even the picky eaters! It’s considerably lower in fat, contains a fair amount of vegetables, and uses nutrient rich ingredients. Try it and let me know how it goes!
Hide
©2016 Fort HealthCare | 611 Sherman Avenue East Fort Atkinson, WI 53538
Phone: 920.568.5000 | www.forthealthcare.com