Health365 eNews
April 2015 • Volume 7, Issue 4

Managing Family Stress

No one can avoid all stress, especially when it’s in your own home. Though a growing and changing family is exciting, sometimes it can be hectic, too. With children growing, potential family conflict, and busy schedules, the home can create a stressful environment. Here are some quick and easy steps to manage family stress in a fun, unified way.


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20140403-01No one can avoid all stress, especially when it’s in your own home. Though a growing and changing family is exciting, sometimes it can be hectic, too. With children growing, potential family conflict, and busy schedules, the home can create a stressful environment. Here are some quick and easy steps to manage family stress in a fun, unified way.

Understanding Family Stress

Family stress can be defined as a real or imagined imbalance between the demands of the family and the family’s ability to meet those needs. As a family, it is important to understand and address stress together as a whole team, not just as individuals. With open discussions about each family member’s stresses and troubles, it opens the door to express concerns and develop solutions. When one family members is stressed, it can create stress among every individual of the family.

Creating a Stress-Free Environment Together

With constant communication and an understanding of your family’s wants and needs, there are simple steps that you can take to make your home environment as stress free as possible.

  • Activities as a Family: working hard to keep your family functioning as a unit can create trust, along with better communication skills. Find an activity everyone will enjoy.
  • Building Self-Esteem: Showing appreciation for other family members creates a more positive, calm home. Taking care of each other and listening to other’s issues can boost mental health in a tremendous way
  • Nourishing the Spirit: It’s easy to forget what your values and goals are as a family. Sometimes, embracing your family and sharing your goals in life can create a stronger bond between one another. Put some fun back into your life and remain grateful for the important people around you.

 

These simple steps can create a home environment that is pleasant and supportive. Though no one can ever truly avoid stress it is important to keep a happy, healthy family. Communication, embracing values, and making time for one another are just a few ways in which your loved ones can be stress free.

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Manage Stress with a Healthy Lifestyle

Manage Stress with a Healthy Lifestyle

April is National Stress Management month. Managing stress is easier if you take good care of yourself. Make time for rest and recreation. Eat healthier meals. Take a walk now and then. And don’t forget to treat yourself. A little down time can go a long way.


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Manage Stress with a Healthy Lifestyle

April is National Stress Management month. Managing stress is easier if you take good care of yourself. Make time for rest and recreation. Eat healthier meals. Take a walk now and then. And don’t forget to treat yourself. A little down time can go a long way.

Get enough rest

When you don’t get enough sleep, you may be too tired to cope with stress. Also, stress can prevent you from sleeping well or may keep you awake. If this happens to you, try reading or listening to soothing music before you go to sleep.

Make time for yourself

In today’s world, there is often too much to do in too little time. It may seem hard to make time for yourself. But try to spend just a few minutes each day doing something you enjoy. This can improve the quality of your life and your mental outlook. Also, you’ll be more productive when handling your day-to-day duties. And you’ll be in a better frame of mind to cope with stress.

Eat right

It’s easy to react to stress by reaching for a bag of chips or a cup of coffee. This may give you a quick boost but may later drain your energy. To keep your energy level steady, eat healthy meals and snacks at home and at work. Try not to skip meals. Stick with a low-fat diet that’s rich in whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables.

Nourish your spirit

When life is hectic, it’s easy to forget what your values and goals are. To help prevent this from happening, find out what is most important in your life. Ask yourself, “What would I miss most if I had to start a new life alone somewhere else? My work? My family or friends? Something I love doing?” Then focus on embracing your values and what you want to achieve in your life.

Stay on the move

Exercise helps burn off the negative energy of stress. Doing something active that you enjoy also helps you get away from stressful situations. Try to walk, jog, skate, swim, dance, take a fitness class, or play a team sport on most days. Or, practice yoga or tai chi, which can help you relax.

Put some fun into your life

Some things you may enjoy doing are listed below. Check off the ones you’ll try. Then add your own.

  • Try a new hobby
  • Plan a fun trip
  • Have lunch with a friend
  • Learn a new sport or game
  • Go see a movie
  • Take a class on something you always wanted to learn

 

Spring Cleaning Safety Tips

While doing their spring cleaning, families will use a wide range of products that can cause accidental poisonings, an expert says.

But taking appropriate precautions will reduce the risk of danger, said Earl Siegel, managing director of the drug and poison information center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio.

“It is vital that people arm themselves with basic information on poison prevention in the home, such as keeping chemicals out of the reach of children and carefully reading the labels and dosages on all products,” he said in a hospital news release.

Tips for preventing poisonings during spring cleaning are offered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Keep cleaning products in their original bottles or containers. Don’t store them in cups, bottles or jars. Never sniff containers to determine what’s inside.

Keep cleaning products locked up and out of sight and reach of children.

Read the label before you use a cleaning product. And never mix products together; doing so could create a dangerous gas.

Open windows and turn on fans when using cleaners or other chemicals. Also, wear protective clothing — long sleeves, long pants, socks, shoes and gloves — if you’re spraying pesticides or other chemicals. Stay away from newly sprayed areas for at least an hour, or until the spray has dried.

If you clean out your medicine cabinet, keep all medicines out of the sight and reach of children while you’re working.

If a poisoning occurs, call the Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222 immediately.

 

 

NCADD ACOHOL AWARENESS MONTH 2015

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Spring Cleaning Safety Tips

While doing their spring cleaning, families will use a wide range of products that can cause accidental poisonings, an expert says.

But taking appropriate precautions will reduce the risk of danger, said Earl Siegel, managing director of the drug and poison information center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio.

 


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While doing their spring cleaning, families will use a wide range of products that can cause accidental poisonings, an expert says.

But taking appropriate precautions will reduce the risk of danger, said Earl Siegel, managing director of the drug and poison information center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio.

“It is vital that people arm themselves with basic information on poison prevention in the home, such as keeping chemicals out of the reach of children and carefully reading the labels and dosages on all products,” he said in a hospital news release.

Tips for preventing poisonings during spring cleaning are offered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Keep cleaning products in their original bottles or containers. Don’t store them in cups, bottles or jars. Never sniff containers to determine what’s inside.

Keep cleaning products locked up and out of sight and reach of children.

Read the label before you use a cleaning product. And never mix products together; doing so could create a dangerous gas.

Open windows and turn on fans when using cleaners or other chemicals. Also, wear protective clothing — long sleeves, long pants, socks, shoes and gloves — if you’re spraying pesticides or other chemicals. Stay away from newly sprayed areas for at least an hour, or until the spray has dried.

If you clean out your medicine cabinet, keep all medicines out of the sight and reach of children while you’re working.

If a poisoning occurs, call the Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222 immediately.

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NCADD ACOHOL AWARENESS MONTH 2015

Alcohol Awareness Month, founded and sponsored by The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCADD) since 1987, is a national grassroots effort observed by communities throughout the United States to support prevention, research, education, intervention, treatment and recovery from alcoholism and alcohol-related problems.


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Alcohol and Your Heart

Over the last three decades, a number of studies have shown an association between moderate drinking and a lowered risk for heart attack, heart and circulatory diseases, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and gallstones.

But the research results lead to a kind of two-edged sword when it comes to alcohol. Alcohol may have some health benefits, but it may also lead to abusive drinking and other diseases. Because there is no sure way to know who will develop an abuse problem, the American Heart Association (AHA) and other experts don’t recommend starting to drink if you don’t already do so but to talk with your health care provider about the benefits and risks of moderate alcohol use.

Learn the meaning of moderation

Moderate drinking is defined as no more than one drink a day for women and two drinks a day for men. Pregnant women should avoid all alcohol as it can lead to birth defects. A drink is considered 12 ounces of regular beer, 4 to 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits.

Moderation is defined differently for men, women, and older adults because alcohol’s effects depend on how the body absorbs and metabolizes alcohol. Older adults metabolize, or break down, alcohol more slowly than younger people. This means alcohol stays in their bodies longer. A person’s height and weight are critical in alcohol absorption. The smaller and lighter you are, the more quickly alcohol is absorbed.

Know how you react to alcohol

People respond differently to alcohol for other reasons besides height and weight. Your gender, age, genetics, overall health, the amount of alcohol you drink, when you drink it, and any history of problem drinking can affect your reaction to alcohol.

When alcohol is consumed, it passes from the stomach and small intestine into the blood and is transported to all organs of the body. Alcohol is water soluble, so it enters your organs in proportion to the amount of water they contain. The more water available in the organs to absorb alcohol, the less alcohol remains in your bloodstream.

Your liver does most of the work of breaking down, or metabolizing, the alcohol you drink. The liver removes alcohol from your body so it won’t damage other organs. The liver can break down only a certain amount of alcohol per hour, regardless of the amount you drink. A very small percentage of alcohol escapes this metabolic process and is eliminated unchanged in your breath, sweat and urine. (This alcohol can be detected in a breathalyzer test.) Until all the alcohol in the body has been metabolized, it stays in the brain and other tissues of the body and continues to cause effects.

Men vs. women

In general, women and older men have less water in their organs than younger men. Therefore, less alcohol enters their organs and more alcohol remains in their bloodstream. Younger women produce less of a stomach enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase, which breaks down alcohol in the stomach. This means more alcohol is available to be absorbed into the blood. As a result, a young woman will have a higher blood alcohol level than a man of the same age who drinks the same amount of alcohol.

Heredity may play a role in how alcohol and your body interact. Moderate drinkers who have genes that cause a slower metabolism of alcohol are at much lower risk for cardiovascular disease than moderate drinkers who have genes that cause rapid metabolism of alcohol.

Alcohol is metabolized more slowly than it is absorbed. Absorption is slowed when you drink alcohol during or immediately after a meal. The slower absorption allows the liver to metabolize alcohol at a rate that prevents more of it from reaching other organs.

Because the liver metabolizes alcohol, people with liver disease are more sensitive to drinking. Certain medications may trigger adverse reactions if you drink while taking them. Alcohol affects the metabolism of a wide variety of medications by increasing the activity of some and decreasing the activity of others. Most notably, heavy alcohol consumption when taking acetaminophen (Tylenol) can lead to liver damage.

Additionally, for people with a history of alcoholism, the danger of drinking is far greater than the possible cardiovascular benefits.

Health benefits and concerns

The AHA says moderate alcohol consumption helps protect against heart disease by raising HDL (“good”) cholesterol and reducing plaque accumulations in your arteries. Alcohol also has a mild anticoagulating effect, keeping platelets from clumping together to form blood clots. According to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, moderate drinking may lower the risk for coronary heart disease among men older than 45 and women older than 55. Moderate consumption provides little, if any, health benefit for younger people, and the risk of alcohol abuse increases when drinking starts at an early age. Remember that alcohol doesn’t provide complete protection against heart disease or compensate for negative health habits like smoking, which lowers HDL and increases the risk of harmful blood clots.

Moreover, the AHA says, regular physical exercise also can raise HDL. And excessive drinking can raise triglyceride levels, increase blood pressure, and raise the risk for stroke.

Consider alcohol’s caloric content

There’s no fat in alcohol. That’s the good news. But there are 7 calories per gram, and that translates to between 100 and 150 calories for the alcohol in a typical beer, wine, or spirits drink. Add to that the calories in drink mixers, and drinking could be a setup for weight gain.

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AHA Corner


As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

March (Nutrition) Madness

I missed everyone last week, and have returned from vacation. (No, my boss didn’t give me permission to leave my job to exercise 24/7, if that’s what you thought).

I’m not sure about you, but this warmer weather and SUNSHINE gives me the hypers….more than what I already have! I guess it shouldn’t shock me, but it’s a whole different world in Wisconsin when the temperature gets above 40 degrees. People emerge from EVERYWHERE, and it’s such a great sight. I went for a run on Tuesday evening, and I kid you not within 2 miles, 6 houses were grilling. Do you know how tough it is to run while your stomach is eating itself because you smell charcoal and delicious food?

Anywho, March is National Nutrition month and what a perfect topic for this week’s blog.


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News

DR. JEFFREY D. LARSON, MD, PROVIDES PLASTIC SURGERY SERVICES TO FORT HEALTHCARE

FORT ATKINSON – Dr. Jeffrey D. Larson, MD, board certified Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon from Meriter-Unity Point Health will be providing both non-surgical and surgical treatments as an outreach specialist at Fort HealthCare once a week. Dr. Larson specializes in plastic, reconstructive, and hand surgery.

With the goals of making a positive impact in someone’s life, Dr. Larson specializes in both non-surgical cosmetic services (Botox, Juvéderm, Latisse, Vein Care) and a full spectrum of aesthetic surgical procedures (Body Contouring, Breast Augmentation, Lift, Reduction, Facelift, Liposuctions, Rhinoplasty, Tummy Tuck, and Upper & Lower Eyelid Surgery).

With building strong, personal relationships, he will work to identify a goal for his patients and develop a treatment plan tailored to each individual. His broad experience makes him uniquely suited to help patients achieve the results they desire. Dr. Larson will work closely with the Fort HealthCare physicians in providing quality care close to home.

For more information call (920) 568-5334.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
April 6 Boot Camp
April 6 Cardio Kickboxing
April 6 Form and Function
April 6 Core, Balance, Stretch
April 6 Obtaining ABG’s
April 6 Childbirth Prep Class
April 7 Upper Body Sculpt
April 7 Glutes and Abs
April 7 Boot Camp
April 8 Step Aerobics
April 9 Lower Body Sculpt
April 9 Glutes and Abs
April 9 Boot Camp
April 9 Cardio Kickboxing
April 10 Skinny Arms Express
April 10 Cardio Kickboxing Express
April 11 On my own at home
April 13 Continuing Yoga
April 13 Beginning Yoga
April 13 Having Healthy Babies
April 14 No Nonsense, Low-Impact
April 14 Beginning Yoga
April 15 Skinny Arms Express
April 15 Body Blast
April 15 Glutes and Abs
April 15 Noon Beginning Yoga
April 17 Basic Life Support (BLS)
April 20 Zumba
April 20 Basic EKG Class
April 22 Zumba
April 23 Zumba
April 27 Critical Care Class
April 28 Basic Life Support (BLS)
April 29 Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS)
Recipes

Fruit Cups

Keeping the family in mind, a fun activity to share together is making yummy treats that will create wonderful memories. Your children can help make this easy snack that’s colorful and nutritious for everyone in your family to enjoy. Have all your supplies and ingredients ready before you begin; be careful with boiling water and small children!



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Keeping the family in mind, a fun activity to share together is making yummy treats that will create wonderful memories. Your children can help make this easy snack that’s colorful and nutritious for everyone in your family to enjoy. Have all your supplies and ingredients ready before you begin; be careful with boiling water and small children!

Ingredients

1 15-ounce can fruit cocktail (in its own juice)

1 3-ounce package sugar-free Jell-O, or any other gelatin mix, any flavor

1 cup boiling water

1 cup cold water

Directions

Place equal amount of fruit cocktail in each of four small bowls. Put boiling water into a mixing bowl. Sprinkle in Jell-O powder and stir for about two minutes. You can let an older child stir, while a younger child watches the clock or counts slowly to 120. Add cold water. Use a ladle to pour Jell-O into the bowls over the fruit.

Put bowls in refrigerator for 1½ to 2 hours. When Jell-O is firm, it’s ready.

Optional: Top with one tablespoon of vanilla fat-free yogurt.

Serves Four

Each dessert contains approximately 70 calories, less than 1 gram protein, zero grams fat, 13 grams carbohydrate. Enjoy!

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