Health365 eNews
March 2015 • Volume 7, Issue 3

March: National Nutrition Month

Dieting and Exercise usually go hand-in-hand when talking about lifestyle changes. You need to be making healthy food choices while moving your body to create a calorie deficit that will help you to lose weight.


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Dieting and Exercise usually go hand-in-hand when talking about lifestyle changes. You need to be making healthy food choices while moving your body to create a calorie deficit that will help you to lose weight.

This video that highlights Fort HealthCare physician Dr. Misorski, he discusses the recent lifestyle changes he has made and the dramatic weight loss success he has had. He discusses how he was noticing a lack of energy, joint paid and a general feeling of lethargy when he was heavier, and finally found the motivation when his wife had decided to lose weight for their son’s upcoming wedding.

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He credits his lifestyle change to portion control, exercising, watching foods that were high in fat and sugar and ultimately kept a calorie count daily and stuck with it. Lifestyle changes are difficult to accomplish when you feel there is a ‘finish line’, and you decide to go back to your old habits. You have to be ready for the commitment, and take it step by step.

We have experts that can help you along the way. When you’re ready to begin your weight-loss journey, please contact Fort HealthCare’s Nutrition Services at 920-568-5464.

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How to Make Heart-Healthy Food Choices

Maintaining a healthy diet is one of the best weapons for fighting cardiovascular disease and other heart conditions.

Assuming most Americans know this fact, why is heart disease still the number 1 killer among adults? A major reason is that most Americans eat too many high-fat, high-calorie foods.


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Maintaining a healthy diet is one of the best weapons for fighting cardiovascular disease and other heart conditions.

Assuming most Americans know this fact, why is heart disease still the number 1 killer among adults? A major reason is that most Americans eat too many high-fat, high-calorie foods.

These steps will help you reduce your risk for this condition:

  • Eat at least 2 cups of fruit and 2½ to 3 cups of vegetables every day. Produce is full of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and other essential nutrients. And produce is practically free of fat and cholesterol.
  • Cut back on high-fat foods containing partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, trans fat, and saturated fat. Use liquid vegetable oils in place of soft or hard margarine or shortening. Limit cheese, butter, ice cream processed and fatty meats, cakes, cookies, pastries, muffins, pies, and doughnuts.
  • Eat more seafood, and eat fish at least two times a week. Recent research shows that eating fish like salmon, trout, and herring can be good for you. All of these contain omega-3 fatty acids. They may help lower your risk for death from coronary artery disease.
  • Read and compare food labels. To make the best use of food labels, first look at how many servings the package contains. Then look at the calories and fat per serving. Multiply the calories and fat by the number of servings you’re going to eat.
  • Cut back on foods that are high in cholesterol. Some of these foods are eggs, red meat, and liver.
  • Limit sugary beverages like soda or pop and juice with added sugar.
  • If you drink alcoholic beverages, limit your intake. Alcohol is high in calories. Limit intake to 1 drink per day for women and 2 for men.
  • Prepare foods with little or no added salt.

After you purchase nutritious foods, make certain you prepare them in a healthy manner. Grill fish and chicken instead of frying them. Finally, watch food portion size — and watch your health improve the longer you select heart-healthy food choices!

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Exercise and Eat Smart to Keep the Weight Off

Exercise Every Day

People in the National Weight Control Registry, a group of more than 10,000 members, have lost an average of 60 pounds and kept their weight stable for up to 5 years. In order to keep their weight off, members report exercising, on average, about 1 hour per day.

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recommends that a person get at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. But if you’re trying to lose weight or maintain your weight, you’ll need to boost your physical activity to 60 to 90 minutes a day. It will also help to chart your progress as you increase your activity level.


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Exercise Every Day

People in the National Weight Control Registry, a group of more than 10,000 members, have lost an average of 60 pounds and kept their weight stable for up to 5 years. In order to keep their weight off, members report exercising, on average, about 1 hour per day.

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recommends that a person get at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. But if you’re trying to lose weight or maintain your weight, you’ll need to boost your physical activity to 60 to 90 minutes a day. It will also help to chart your progress as you increase your activity level.

To begin an exercise program:

  • Talk with your health care provider first and then start slowly. Begin with 10 to 30 minutes of moderately intense activity, like walking 3 days a week. Build up to 45 to 60 minutes on most days.
  • Schedule your physical activity a week in advance, use a diary to record the actual time you exercise, and try to set aside a regular time of the day for exercise if possible.

Eat Smart

Most successful dieters make changes in what, when, and how much they eat. The American Heart Association recommends following these healthy eating habits:

  • Eat reasonable portions. Studies show most Americans eat food portions 2 or 3 times larger than necessary for good nutrition and weight maintenance. To restrict your portion sizes, use a salad plate instead of a dinner plate when dining at home. When dining out, split an entrée with a dining companion or order appetizer plates instead of full meals.
  • Eat breakfast. People who eat breakfast eat fewer calories throughout the day and are less likely to overdo because of hunger at lunch or dinner.
  • Shop smart. Stock up on fresh, low-fat foods. Use a shopping list, and don’t shop when you’re hungry.
  • Plan all your meals. When you’re going to a party or out to eat, decide ahead of time what you can do to make it easier to eat healthy.
  • Manage cravings. When you really crave a high-calorie food, eat a small amount of it, instead of resisting until you give in and eat too much.
  • Eat slowly. Taking your time and enjoying each bite makes meals and the food you eat more satisfying, so you are likely to eat less.
  • Maintain motivation. Keeping your motivation up is an important part of making any change permanent. Try the following strategies if your effort starts to sag:
  • Weigh yourself regularly. Doing so is an excellent way to keep your target goal — maintaining your weight — in front of you. Weekly (not daily) weigh-ins are best and allow you to take action, by cutting calories, exercising more, or both, if your weight creeps up to three pounds over your maintenance target.
  • Cut yourself some slack. A lapse is a small mistake or a temporary return to old habits. This can happen when you have a bad day and overeat or don’t exercise. A relapse is when you go back to old habits for several days or weeks. Remember, having a lapse or relapse isn’t necessarily failing. Don’t give up, but do get back on track.
  • Avoid emotional eating. Try to use other ways to respond to life’s stresses besides eating. Take a walk, start a new hobby, or calm yourself through meditation.
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Fill your Grocery Cart with Savings

Tightening your belt doesn’t have to mean going hungry. It’s possible to eat well and save money at the same time.

Here are a few ways to trim your food budget while still serving wholesome, healthy meals to your family:


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Tightening your belt doesn’t have to mean going hungry. It’s possible to eat well and save money at the same time.

Here are a few ways to trim your food budget while still serving wholesome, healthy meals to your family:

  • Make a plan. Each week, check your cabinets and grocery store ads. Combine foods you already have with sale or special items to plan a menu. Keep in mind that some products almost always give you a nutritious bang for your buck. These include dried beans, sweet potatoes, brown rice, and noninstant, whole-grain oatmeal. Write down each meal and a grocery list of foods you need to complete them.
  • Follow through. At the store, stick to your list. Stay at the outer edges – near the produce, meat, dairy, and bakery – and in the canned and frozen aisles. You’ll avoid being tempted by fancy displays or unhealthy, expensive processed foods. Read labels carefully to be sure you’re getting the lowest price per ounce. Consider store brands instead of brand names.
  • Shop in season. Buy fresh fruits and vegetables near the time when they’re grown. Check farmers markets if they aren’t available at your grocery store. Only buy as much as you need. Or try frozen fruits and veggies. They’re just as healthy and often less expensive, especially outside growing season.
  • Get help if you need it. The USDA offers assistance programs for families in need. Call 800-221-5689 or visit the USDA website for details.

Quick tip

When you can’t cook, eat out smart. Share an entrée or take home your leftovers. Combine leftovers with fresh produce or pantry items for a whole new meal.

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American Heart Association on Nutrition

The leading risk factor for death and disability in the United States is suboptimal diet quality, which in 2010 led to 678,000 annual deaths of all causes.

Major contributors were insufficient intakes of fruits, nuts/seeds, Whole grains, vegetables, and seafood, as well as excess Intakes of sodium. In the United States, an estimated 58,000 annual CVD deaths in 2010 were attributable to sodium intake >2.0 g/d, representing 1 in 16 (6.3%) of all CVD deaths and 1 in 8 (13.1%) CVD deaths before age 70 years.


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2015-02-03-04

Article information provided from:

SCIENCE NEWS From ISC 2015
International Stroke Conference 2015
Friday, February 13, 2015                                                                                     

Nutrition (an excerpt from chapter 5 of report)

The leading risk factor for death and disability in the United States is suboptimal diet quality, which in 2010 led to 678,000 annual deaths of all causes.

Major contributors were insufficient intakes of fruits, nuts/seeds, Whole grains, vegetables, and seafood, as well as excess Intakes of sodium. In the United States, an estimated 58,000 annual CVD deaths in 2010 were attributable to sodium intake >2.0 g/d, representing 1 in 16 (6.3%) of all CVD deaths and 1 in 8 (13.1%) CVD deaths before age 70 years.

Globally, an estimated 1.65 million annual CVD deaths were attributable to sodium intake >2.0 g/d, representing nearly 1 in 10 (9.5%) of all CVD deaths.

Although healthier diets cost modestly more than unhealthful diets, comparing extremes of unhealthful versus healthful food-based diet patterns, the more healthful patterns cost on average ≈$1.50 per day more. Similarly priced options are also common; in a comparison of 20 fruits and vegetables versus 20 common snack foods such as cookies, chips, pastries, and crackers, the average price per portion of fruits and vegetables was 31 cents, with an average of 57 calories per portion, versus 33 cents and 183 calories per portion for snack foods.

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Are You Up-to-Date on Colorectal Cancer Screening

Colorectal cancer is a stealthy disease. It can begin unnoticed in your colon or rectum. By the time you develop symptoms, it has grown and possibly spread, making it harder to treat. Screening can help spot this cancer early. But too many U.S. adults ages 50 and older are still skirting this lifesaving tool.

 


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Colorectal cancer is a stealthy disease. It can begin unnoticed in your colon or rectum. By the time you develop symptoms, it has grown and possibly spread, making it harder to treat. Screening can help spot this cancer early. But too many U.S. adults ages 50 and older are still skirting this lifesaving tool.

Stalled Screening Rates

In a recent study, researchers set out to find the latest screening rates for colorectal cancer in the U.S. They looked at data from a 2012 national health survey. The survey asked adults questions about lifestyle behaviors, such as smoking. It also asked about preventive care, including cancer screenings.

Past research noted an 11% jump in screening rates for colorectal cancer from 2002 to 2010. The proportion of adults being screened rose from 54% to 65%. In this latest study, though, that progress seems to have sputtered. Researchers found that the percentage of adults screened in 2012 hovered at 65%. That leaves more than one-third of eligible adults not up to date or completely unscreened for colorectal cancer.

Your screening options

Colonoscopy is the most commonly used screening tool. A doctor looks at the entire rectum and colon for signs of cancer with a colonoscope—a flexible, lighted tube with an attached camera. He or she can even remove precancerous growths called polyps during the procedure.

Unfortunately, some people may avoid a colonoscopy because it requires a lengthy process to clean out the colon before the procedure. In fact, they may pass up colorectal cancer screening altogether. Other screening options are available, though. These include:

A fecal occult blood test: A lab scans a stool sample for blood, a possible sign of cancer.
Sigmoidoscopy: This procedure is similar to a colonoscopy, but it looks only at the rectum and the lower colon.
Barium enema: A series of X-rays highlight any problems in the colon and rectum.
Virtual colonoscopy: A CT scan supplies detailed images of the colon.

Each screening test has benefits and risks. If you are age 50 or older, talk with your doctor to find out which option is right for you. No matter your choice, screening can save your life.

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We Recommend Routine Maintenance on Your Tailpipe to Keep You Up and Running.

Get a Colonoscopy, Get a Gas Card

Are you due for a colon screening? Are you are over the age of 50 and haven’t had one in the last 10 years? Then it is time for a checkup. Fort HealthCare is proudly participating in Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month sharing information and $25 gas cards for eligible patients. Even if you do not have a family history of colon cancer, we encourage you to speak with your doctor about a colon screening.

 


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2015-02-03-07

(We’re not talking about your car.)

Get a Colonoscopy, Get a Gas Card

Are you due for a colon screening? Are you are over the age of 50 and haven’t had one in the last 10 years? Then it is time for a checkup. Fort HealthCare is proudly participating in Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month sharing information and $25 gas cards for eligible patients. Even if you do not have a family history of colon cancer, we encourage you to speak with your doctor about a colon screening.

Colon cancer is a big deal in the United States. Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, “most of these deaths could have been prevented if everyone over the age of 50 years got screened for colorectal cancer.” Polyps are growths that stick out of the lining of the colon or rectum, often show no symptoms, and some types can turn into cancer within five to 15 years. Doing a routine colonoscopy, polyps can be removed, preventing cancer from ever forming.

Community members are encouraged to call and schedule a colonoscopy at Fort HealthCare by April 15th. Eligible patients, those over the age of 50 who are otherwise healthy and not have a had colonoscopy in the past 10 years, who schedule and come in for a colonoscopy before April 16th will receive a $25 gas card.

A colonoscopy is a quick and easy outpatient procedure which uses a colonoscope that allows the doctor to look at the inner lining of you large intestines and identifies polyps. A colonoscopy can be vital for a healthy, happy and long life. The process usually takes about 30 minutes to an hour, and only occasionally causes a small degree of discomfort. Risk can include infection, perforation of the bowel, bleeding or an adverse reaction to medication; however, risks are extremely rare and are minimal when compared with those of colon cancer. Patients should discuss the benefits and risks of a colonoscopy with their doctor, especially if there are questions or concerns.

To book an appointment, contact Fort HealthCare Surgical Associates at (920) 563-7900 or the Lake Mills clinic at (920) 648-8393 Appointments are available now through April 15th on a first come first serve basis to be eligible to receive a $25 gas card. If you’re not ready to make an appointment at this time, you are more than welcome and encouraged to schedule a colonoscopy at any time throughout the year.

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March Monthly Contest ‘For Health’

Learn about Colon Nutrition and enter to win a FREE Health Class at FortHealthCare.com/Heart for the February Monthly Contest For Health.


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Learn about Colon Nutrition and enter to win a FREE Health Class at FortHealthCare.com/Heart for the February Monthly Contest For Health.

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February Contest ‘For Health’ Winner: Jane Wegner of Whitewater won a Free Heart Saver course provided through the Fort HealthCare American Heart Association Training Center.

Congratulations Jane!

 

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News

FROSTY ROCK CHALLENGE PRESENTS CHECK TO JEFFERSON COUNTY CANCER COALITION

 

$6,541.38 check was presented to the Jefferson County Cancer Coalition (JCOCC) by Fort HealthCare Therapy & Sport, Orthopaedic Associates and Integrated Family Care due to the success of the 2nd Annual Frosty Rock Challenge hosted in 2014.

With a total of 300 runners and 80 volunteers registered in 2014, the Frosty Rock Challenge gives the local community the opportunity to donate and support JCOCC. This non-profit organization provides financial assistance to cancer victims and their families of Jefferson County who have difficulties meeting everyday needs while fighting cancer. With 100 percent of the proceeds of the Frosty Rock Challenge being donated to the JCOCC, the organization strives to assist cancer patients with transportation services, disease education, and research funding.


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HealtheLife App for MyCompass

There is now a mobile app for the MyCompass patient portal. The HealtheLife app for Apple iOS app gives patients easy mobile access to Fort HealthCare’s MyCompass patient portal. The content shown in the app is the same information available on the website. You can download the app for iPhones from the Apple Store today. The HealtheLife app makes access to your health records in Fort HealthCare’s MyCompass patient portal easier than ever before. The benefits of using the MyCompass patient portal are always growing and improving. We continually strive to increase your options for personalized and professional care close to home and access to your health information from wherever you are and whenever you need it.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
March 2 Early Season Golf Tactics
March 2 Basic EKG
March 2 Zumba
March 4 Basic Life Support (BLS)
March 4 ZUMBA
March 9 Having Healthy Babies
March 10 Aqua Zumba
March 10 Weight-loss surgery seminar
March 12 Free Health Screening
March 12 Brother, Sister, Sibling-to-be
March 12 Basic Life Support
March 15 On my own at home
March 15 Whitewater W3 Wellfest
March 18 AHA Heartsaver Family and Friends
March 18 Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS)
March 21 AHA Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
March 22 Jefferson JUMP Wellness Fair
March 23 Critical Care Classes
March 25 AHA ACLS Renewal
March 25 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED
March 31 Healthy Steps
Recipes

Fruit Nutty Spinach

Including nuts in your diet can provide a host of health benefits. The list includes lower cholesterol levels, reduced risk for heart disease and stroke, better weight control, and lower insulin needs for people with diabetes. High fiber and these additional benefits also contribute to better colon health.



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Including nuts in your diet can provide a host of health benefits. The list includes lower cholesterol levels, reduced risk for heart disease and stroke, better weight control, and lower insulin needs for people with diabetes. High fiber and these additional benefits also contribute to better colon health.

Ingredients

2 tbsp. chopped walnuts, toasted

1 tsp. olive oil

1 9-oz. bag of fresh spinach (about 4 cups raw)

2 tbsp. golden raisins

Directions

Heat a frying pan and add chopped walnuts. Shake the pan to turn the nuts. When you begin to smell them toasting, turn off the heat. Transfer toasted nuts to a bowl.

Remove stems from spinach. Rinse and drain in a colander and pat with a paper towel. Heat oil in the frying pan and sauté spinach until soft and bright green. Add raisins and nuts and stir until hot. Serve immediately.

Makes two servings

Each serving contains 110 calories, 7 g fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 49 mg sodium, 10 g carbohydrates.

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