Health365 eNews
October 2014 • Volume 6, Issue 10

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month!

Evaluate Your Diet and Risk of Breast Cancer

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. About 1 in 8 U.S. women or just over 12% will develop invasive breast cancer in her lifetime. Breast cancer incidence rates have been declining in the U.S. since 2000. One theory for the decline is due to reduced use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after a study was published in 2002 that suggested a connection with HRT and breast cancer.


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Evaluate Your Diet and Risk of Breast Cancer

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. About 1 in 8 U.S. women or just over 12% will develop invasive breast cancer in her lifetime. Breast cancer incidence rates have been declining in the U.S. since 2000. One theory for the decline is due to reduced use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after a study was published in 2002 that suggested a connection with HRT and breast cancer. Death rates have been declining since 1989 due to treatment advances and earlier detection screening. In 2013 there were more than 2.8 million women who are currently being treated or who have been treated for breast cancer. A women’s risk for breast cancer doubles if she has a first-degree relative with breast cancer (mother, sister, daughter). However, 85% of breast cancers occur in women with no family history of breast cancer. These cancers occur because of genetic mutations that happen as a result of the aging process and life in general.

In the past, there was concern that soy in the diet may increase risk of breast cancer due to the isoflavone compounds in soy that mimic the action of estrogen. New research shows breast cancer patients and survivors no longer need to worry about consuming moderate amounts of soy based on studies published by the American Institute of Cancer Research. Determining if soy was safe was a big research question and the evidence consistently shows it is safe now. Laboratory animal studies show these animals metabolize soy isoflavones differently than humans. Soy consumption does not lead to elevated estrogen levels in humans. A moderate amount of soy is one or two standard servings daily of whole soy food such as tofu, soy milk or edamame. As many as three servings have not shown increased risk. Additionally, lab studies show that soy isoflavones inhibit a number of cell signaling pathways linked to cancer growth suggesting some individuals may benefit more from soy’s compounds.

Consuming high amounts of fats in the diet is another area of research. A recent Italian study published in Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows there is a link to certain types of breast tumors. In the study, consuming high amounts of total fat, and specifically saturated fats are linked to increased risk of breast tumors fueled by hormones estrogen and progesterone. Three quarters of U. S. breast tumors are estrogen receptor positive. Increased risk comes from high amounts of saturated fats from burgers, butter and animal origin fats in the diet. A high fat diet is often a high calories diet as well which can lead to weight gain.

Lastly, there is a link between obesity and breast cancer. Fat tissue in the body produces excess amounts of estrogen and high levels are associated with risk of breast, endometrial and some other cancers.

General recommendations to reduce risk of developing breast cancer include:

  • Maintain a healthy weight (BMI 19 – 24) If you are overweight, make a goal to decrease calorie intake and start losing weight. Be physically active (30 min per day or more of aerobic exercise like walking, strength training 2x/week). Drink less alcohol (1 or less drinks per day). Breast feed (the longer the better). Don’t smoke. Minimize hormone therapy. Minimize exposure to radiation and environmental pollution.
  • Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables hasn’t consistently shown to offer protection from breast cancer. However, eating healthy diet may decrease your risk for other types of cancer as well as diabetes, heart disease and stroke. A healthy diet can help you maintain a healthy weight which is a key factor in breast cancer prevention.

-Your Fort HealthCare Nutrition Services

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Frequently Asked Questions: Mammograms

What are the benefits of screening mammography?

Today’s high-quality screening mammogram is the most effective tool available to detect breast cancer before lumps can be felt or symptoms appear. Early detection of breast cancer not only helps provide a woman with more options, but also increases her chances of having the best possible outcome.


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What are the benefits of screening mammography?

Today’s high-quality screening mammogram is the most effective tool available to detect breast cancer before lumps can be felt or symptoms appear. Early detection of breast cancer not only helps provide a woman with more options, but also increases her chances of having the best possible outcome.

Is there a risk of radiation exposure from having regular mammograms?

You may want to ask your doctor about the amount of radiation used during the procedure and the risks related to your particular situation. Special care is taken to ensure that the lowest possible amount of radiation is used when you have a mammogram.

What should a woman expect when having a mammogram?

A woman should not use deodorant, powder, or lotions and should wear two-piece clothing on the day of her mammogram. A specially trained radiology technologist will perform the X-ray. The radiology technologist will ask the woman to undress, put on a gown, and stand next to the X-ray machine. Two flat surfaces, or plates, are slowly squeezed together and compress each breast for a few seconds. This compression may be somewhat painful, but it is necessary to produce the best pictures using the lowest amount of radiation possible.

Are mammograms painful?

Some women find the pressure of the plates on their breasts to be uncomfortable or even painful. Timing your mammogram when your breasts are not tender is important. In premenopausal women, this is usually one week after your menstrual period. If you do experience discomfort or pain, ask the technologist to reposition you to try to make it as painless as possible. Remember that each X-ray takes just a few moments and could save your life.

Who pays for mammography?

The Affordable Care Act mandates that mammograms for breast cancer screening be given without a co-pay or deductible beginning with plan years starting after August 1, 2012. However, health plans that were in place before the Act was passed (called grandfathered plans) do not have to comply. Those plans are covered by various state and federal laws. Medicare covers annual mammography screenings for women ages 40 and older. Most states now require that health insurance policies offer mammography screening reimbursement. In addition, many mammography facilities also offer special programs and lower fees during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October.
For low income women, mammograms are covered through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program. For more information, contact your state Department of Health.

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Have a Hazard-Free Halloween

When we think of Halloween, we picture children laughing in colorful costumes, jack-o’-lanterns glowing in house windows, and buckets brimming with candy and treats. Experts warn, however, that this fun-filled night can pose safety hazards.

An alternative is to throw a Halloween party and invite kids, rather than have them out on the street. Some precautions can make the evening safe and enjoyable for everyone.


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When we think of Halloween, we picture children laughing in colorful costumes, jack-o’-lanterns glowing in house windows, and buckets brimming with candy and treats. Experts warn, however, that this fun-filled night can pose safety hazards.

An alternative is to throw a Halloween party and invite kids, rather than have them out on the street. If your kids will be going door-to-door trick or treating, however, some precautions can make the evening safe and enjoyable for everyone.

Costumes

Safety begins at home, with the child’s costume. Every part of the costume–masks, beards, wigs and clothing–should be made of flame-resistant material, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). In the event that a child bumps up against a burning candle, such materials will quickly extinguish themselves. When purchasing a store-bought costume, look for a label that says "Flame Resistant." Choose costumes without big, loose sleeves, skirts, or pants legs to lessen the chance of coming into contact with an open flame.

If the costume is not brightly colored, and therefore not easily visible at night, add a strip of reflective tape, which is sold at hardware and sporting goods stores.

Around the home

To make your home safe and inviting for trick-or-treaters, leave your front lights on so they may have a well-lit path to your door. (A well-lit home also reduces your chances of being "tricked" by holiday vandals!) Remove items such as planters, hoses, and lawn decorations, so your visitors don’t trip on them. Keep pets inside, out of harm’s way.

Place candle-lit jack-o’-lanterns far away from the door, so tiny goblins won’t accidentally brush against them. Keep your indoor jack-o’-lanterns away from curtains and any decorations that could catch fire. The CPSC recommends against using candle-lit Halloween luminaries along your walkway; instead, place flashlights inside the bags.

On the streets

Young children should trick-or-treat with an adult or a responsible, older child. Instruct children to stay on the sidewalk and out of the roadway. Remind them to walk, not run, and to go to houses only where they know the people inside. They should avoid unfamiliar houses and lawns, where ornaments, furniture, and even tree stumps can cause them to trip. At no time should they enter a house, unless they are with a grown-up.

While driving on Halloween, remember that the night will be filled with excited children who may forget their parents’ warnings about street safety. Drive extra carefully, keeping an eye out for youngsters walking between driveways and cars, or crossing in the middle of the block rather than at the corners. Adult Halloween partiers should have a designated driver, of course.

If you are not walking with your children, make sure you know who is with them–and set a time for them to be home. Give them change for a pay phone, or let them carry a cell phone in case of emergency.

Instruct your kids not to eat any of their goodies until a grown-up has had a chance to carefully examine them.

Make sure the kids eat a healthy meal before trick-or-treating, so they’ll be less likely to over-indulge on candy.

Tips for costume safety
Follow these costume safety tips from the CPSC:

  • Purchase or make costumes that are light and bright enough to be clearly visible to motorists.
  • For greater visibility during dusk and darkness, decorate, or trim costumes with reflective tape that will glow in the beam of a car’s headlights. Bags or sacks should also be light colored or decorated with reflective tape.
  • To easily see and be seen, children should carry flashlights.
  • Costumes should be short enough to prevent children from tripping and falling.
  • Children should wear well-fitting, sturdy shoes. Mother’s high heels are not a good idea for safe walking.
  • Hats and scarves should be tied securely to prevent them from slipping over children’s eyes.
  • Apply a natural mask of cosmetics rather than have a child wear a loose-fitting mask that might restrict breathing or obscure vision. If a mask is used, however, make sure it fits securely and has eyeholes large enough to allow full vision.
  • Swords, knives, and similar costume accessories should be of soft and flexible material.

Safety tips for pumpkins

Follow these pumpkin safety tips from the CDC:

  • Carve pumpkins on stable, flat surfaces with good lighting.
  • Have children draw a face on the outside of the pumpkin; parents should do the cutting.
  • Place lighted pumpkins away from curtains and other flammable objects.
  • Don’t leave lighted pumpkins unattended.
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Preventing Falls: How to Prepare and What to Do

Falling is not something you want to think about. But it can make a big difference to plan ahead. If you’re prepared, you’ll know how to get help. And you’ll be less likely to panic if you fall. This means you’ll be able to do what’s needed to get help right away.


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Falling is not something you want to think about. But it can make a big difference to plan ahead. If you’re prepared, you’ll know how to get help. And you’ll be less likely to panic if you fall. This means you’ll be able to do what’s needed to get help right away.

How to Prepare

  • Have someone check on you daily.
  • Keep a list of emergency numbers near the phone.
  • Always have a way to call for help. Keep a cell phone with you at all times. Or talk with your health care provider about how to set up a home monitoring service. This involves wearing a small device around your neck. If you fall, you can press the button on the device. This alerts emergency responders.
  • Talk with your health care provider about an exercise program that’s right for you. Regular exercise may reduce the risk of falling and the risk for injury related to a fall.
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  • It’s important to have good lighting in your home. Avoid using throw rugs, because they can raise your risk of tripping and falling. Add grab bars in the bathroom to help reduce the risk of falling. Small changes can make your home safer. Talk with your health care provider about making your home safer. 

What to Do If You Fall

Above all, try to stay calm:

  • If you start to fall, try to relax your body. This will reduce the impact of the fall.
  • After you fall, press your monitor button, or phone for help.
  • Roll onto your side, then crawl to a chair. Pull yourself up into the chair slowly.
  • Don’t rush to get up. First, make sure you’re not hurt.
  • You should be checked if you struck your head, lost consciousness, were confused afterward, or have any other concerns for injury. 
  • Be sure to tell your doctor that you fell. 

A Note to Family and Friends

If you’re with a loved one when he or she starts to fall, don’t try to stop the fall. Ease the person to the floor carefully, so neither of you gets hurt. Don’t leave the person alone. And don’t try to move him or her. Put a pillow under his or her head. Check for injuries. If help is needed right away, be sure to call 911.

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Maintaining Weight Loss

Benefits of maintaining weight loss

While losing weight is difficult for many people, it is even more challenging to keep the weight off. Most people who lose a large amount of weight have regained it 2 to 3 years later. One theory about regaining lost weight is that people who decrease their caloric intake to lose weight experience a drop in their metabolic rate, making it increasingly difficult to lose weight over a period of months.


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Benefits of maintaining weight loss

While losing weight is difficult for many people, it is even more challenging to keep the weight off. Most people who lose a large amount of weight have regained it 2 to 3 years later. One theory about regaining lost weight is that people who decrease their caloric intake to lose weight experience a drop in their metabolic rate, making it increasingly difficult to lose weight over a period of months. A lower metabolic rate may also make it easier to regain weight after a more normal diet is resumed. For these reasons, extremely low calorie diets and rapid weight loss are discouraged.

Losing no more than 1/2 to 2 pounds per week is recommended. Incorporating long-term lifestyle changes are required to increase the chance of successful long-term weight loss.

Weight loss to a healthy weight for a person’s height can promote health benefits such as lower cholesterol and blood sugar levels, lower blood pressure, less stress on bones and joints, and less work for the heart. Thus, it is vital to maintain weight loss to obtain health benefits over a lifetime.

Keeping extra weight off requires effort and commitment, just as losing weight does. Weight loss goals are reached by a combination of changes in diet, eating habits, exercise, and, in extreme circumstances, bariatric surgery.

Weight loss maintenance strategies

The strategies that encourage weight loss also play an important role in maintenance:

  • Support systems used effectively during weight loss can contribute to weight maintenance. According to the National Weight Control Registry, 55% of registry participants used some type of program to achieve their weight loss.
  • Physical activity plays a vital and essential role in maintaining weight loss. Studies show that even exercise that is not rigorous, such as walking and using stairs, has a positive effect. Activity that uses 1,500 to 2,000 calories per week is recommended for maintaining weight loss. Adults should try to get at least 40 minutes of moderate to vigorous level physical activity at least 3 to 4 times per week.
  • Diet and exercise are vital strategies for losing and maintaining weight. Ninety-four percent of the registrants in the National Weight Control Registry increased their physical activity.
  • Once the desired weight has been reached, the gradual addition of about 200 calories of healthy, low-fat food to daily intake may be attempted for one week to see if weight loss continues. If weight loss does continue, additional calories of healthy foods may be added to the daily diet until the right balance of calories to maintain the desired weight has been determined. It may take some time and record keeping to determine how adjusting food intake and exercise levels affect weight.

Continuing to use behavioral strategies is necessary to maintaining weight. Be aware of eating as a response to stress and use exercise, activity, or meditation to cope instead of eating.

A temporary return to old habits does not mean failure. Paying renewed attention to dietary choices and reverting to exercise can help sustain behaviors that maintain weight loss. Identifying situations such as negative moods and interpersonal difficulties and incorporating alternative methods of coping with such situations rather than eating can prevent relapses to old habits.

Weight cycling

Weight cycling is losing and regaining weight multiple times. Some studies suggest that weight cycling, also called "yo-yo dieting," may result in some health risks, such as high blood pressure, gallbladder disease, and high cholesterol. However, these studies are not true for everybody. The best strategy is to avoid weight cycling and to maintain healthy weight through a commitment to increased physical activity and healthy eating.

One myth about weight cycling is that a person who loses and regains weight will have more difficulty losing weight again and maintaining it compared to a person who has not gone through a weight-loss cycle. Most studies show that weight cycling does not affect the rate at which the body burns fuel and a previous weight cycle does not influence the ability to lose weight again. In addition, weight cycling does not increase the amount of fat tissue or increase fat distribution around the stomach.

Always consult your doctor for more information.

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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Avoid the plague!

It became very apparent last weekend and a little into this week that fall is coming quickly, and if you’re not ready—too bad! I ran a 5k this previous weekend, and the temperature at the start of the race was 41 degrees! Holy moly! I had to pull the gloves AND running tights out!

With fall comes a lot of positives—pumpkin-flavored EVERYTHING, football games, changing leaf colors, and, my personal favorite, caramel apples. In midst of all of the negatives, it seems that illness runs rampant through schools, corporations, and wherever else you decide to venture out to.


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News

Rock the Walk begins October 6th!

In 2013, 884 players took 309,190,420 steps in six weeks. Let’s rock the competition in 2014! As in previous years, there will be weekly prizes and a grand prize drawing for all those who achieve at least 5,000 steps per day. The more steps you take, the higher your chances of winning. Remember, any activity can be converted into a number of steps; just get out there and get active!


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Mike Wallace: Light of Wellness Leadership Award winner

On Wednesday, September 24, 2014 Mike Wallace, President/CEO of Fort HealthCare was recognized as the Light of Wellness Leadership Award winner at the Wellness Council of Wisconsin’s Annual Well Workplace Awards Ceremony at the Hilton Milwaukee City Center. This is an annual honor given out by the Wellness Council of Wisconsin.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
October 1 AHA Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
October 2 Basic Life Support (BLS)
October 3 Childbirth Preparation Classes
October 6 Basic Life Support
October 7 Healthy-Steps
October 10 Obtaining ABG's (Arterial Blood Gases)
October 15 Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS)
October 17 Basic Life Support (BLS)
October 18 Red Cross Babysitting
October 20 Critical Care Classes
October 21 AHA Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support Recognition Course
October 22 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED
October 27 Boot Camp
October 27 Cardio Kickboxing
October 27 Core, Balance, and Stretch
October 27 Skinny Arms Express
October 28 Basic Life Support (BLS)
October 28 Boot Camp
October 28 Glutes & Abs
October 29 Upper Body Sculpt
October 29 Body Blast
October 29 Glutes & Abs
October 29 Skinny Arms Express
October 29 Step Aerobics
October 30 Boot Camp
October 30 Cardio Kickboxing
October 30 Glutes & Abs
October 30 Lower Body Sculpt
October 31 Cardio Kickboxing Express
October 28 Glutes & Abs
Recipes

Cilantro Edamame Hummus

Try this new twist on Hummus!



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Ingredients:

  • 1 – 12 oz package frozen shelled edamame (green soybeans)
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • ½ c tahini
  • ½ c water
  • ½ c packed cilantro leaves
  • ½ c lemon juice
  • 3 T extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 t Kosher salt
  • ¾ t ground cumin
  • 1/8 t cayenne pepper

Directions:
Place edamame into a large pot and cover with salted water. Place over med-low heat, bring to simmer, and cook until tender, about 5 minutes, drain

Puree garlic in food processor until minced. Add edamame, tahini, water, cilantro, lemon juice, olive oil, kosher salt, cumin and cayenne pepper. Blend until smooth.

Serve with pita chips or celery sticks.

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