Health365 eNews
January 2015 • Volume 7, Issue 1

Have you scheduled your tune-up?

Start the New Year with a regular tune-up. Visiting your doctor should be like taking your car to the mechanic. Regular maintenance keeps your car running like regular checkups help keep you going.


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Start the New Year with a regular tune-up. Visiting your doctor should be like taking your car to the mechanic.  Regular maintenance keeps your car running like regular checkups help keep you going.

Your Primary Care Physician is the best place to start when you need any type of health care. He or she can guide you in preventive care, diagnose diseases and illnesses and help you find the right specialists when you need them. They can help you navigate the health care system so you can concentrate on your health. They can work with any specialists you have and put all the pieces together to get the “big picture” of your overall health. Your Primary Care Provider is at the forefront of your care and can serve as your best resource. The goal is to find the right fit and establish a long lasting relationship in which you get the direction you need for your health and empower you to be your best advocate in improving your quality of life. To establish an even better relationship with a primary care provider, you can use MyCompass to continue to build that relationship and get the guidance you desire. Your health is important and the providers at Fort HealthCare are here for you.

You have spoken and Fort HealthCare has listened. Fort HealthCare’s My Compass patient portal now has on-line appointment scheduling. You can make appointments to get on the schedule you want, reducing time spent over the phone. From My Compass you can book your appointment anywhere at any time. Once you are in My Compass you have the option to choose the clinic, provider and why the appointment is needed. You can include information about your symptoms, special needs, how you would like to be contacted and then a confirmation. This allows for sick/same day visits, which is something patients have desired and Fort HealthCare is giving you better access to same day care through MyCompass. Direct scheduling is especially convenient for seeing the doctor when you or your child may have that unexpected need.

To help you stay active in the community, Fort HealthCare provides Health365events.com. Health365events.com is a community website for posting, sharing and browsing local health and wellness events.

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Tips to Jump-Start Your New Year's Resolutions

Healthier eating, losing weight and getting more exercise are among the most common New Year’s resolutions, and it’s important to make a plan and be patient to achieve these goals, an expert


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Healthier eating, losing weight and getting more exercise are among the most common New Year’s resolutions, and it’s important to make a plan and be patient to achieve these goals, an expert says

  • If you decide to start eating healthier, it can be difficult to decide where to start. It’s best to focus on specific changes to make your goal more attainable, said Kelly Hogan, a clinical dietitian at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.
  • Here are some examples: Replace fried chicken or fish with baked or broiled versions two or three times a week; eat four or five servings of vegetables every weekday; and cook dinner at home three nights a week instead of ordering carry-out food.
  • Instead of cutting out all your nightly desserts, plan to have one small dessert one or two nights per week. This will satisfy your sweet tooth and prevent intense cravings, Hogan said.
  • If you pledge to get more exercise, try to schedule workouts with a friend who has similar goals so you can hold each other accountable. You could also plan exercise in smaller increments throughout the day, Hogan said. For example, divide 30 minutes of daily exercise into three 10-minute sessions.
  • There are other easy ways to boost your physical-activity levels, Hogan said, such as getting off the subway a few stops early and walking the rest of the way.
  • If you vow to lose weight, you need to keep reminding yourself to be patient. People who lose weight gradually and steadily (1 or 2 pounds a week) are more successful at keeping the weight off, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • One good way to get started is to keep a food journal for a few days in order to get an idea of your eating habits and levels of food consumption, Hogan said. There are some good mobile apps to help you track calorie intake and exercise, she said. If you can, work with a registered dietitian to develop a plan and help you achieve your weight-loss goals, Hogan said.
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A Positive Step Toward Fitness

Are you having second thoughts about exercising?

The way you think about exercise can be the crucial factor in sticking with your fitness program. If you look on it as a disagreeable chore, it becomes one. But if you develop an image as an active, dynamic person, you’ll be more likely to stick to your fitness program.


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Are you having second thoughts about exercising?

The way you think about exercise can be the crucial factor in sticking with your fitness program. If you look on it as a disagreeable chore, it becomes one. But if you develop an image as an active, dynamic person, you’ll be more likely to stick to your fitness program.

  • Find an exercise partner. If you work out on your own, you may end up being less active. If your spouse or a friend goes with you, you’ll have a commitment to honor. You won’t want to let the other person down by not exercising.
  • Break it up and set attainable goals. Cruise through a short jog, for instance, instead of struggling to run three miles. Too often, people starting a fitness program set unrealistic goals. They build in failure because they have expectations that are too large .
  • Reward yourself. Complete a half-hour walk five days in a row? That could mean a trip to the mall to buy some new clothes. Make something that otherwise could be boring fun instead.
  • Before your workout, visualize what you’ll be doing. Try to imagine what you’d look like doing an exercise. It lets you see in your mind’s eye that exercise is beneficial.
  • Realize that only you can control your well-being and your destiny. The best way to change your attitude about exercise is to just do it. Do something a little more each time and recognize that you accomplished something, something to feel pleased about. You build on your accomplishments. You feel pleased with every little step.
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January: Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

What is the cervix?

The cervix is the lower, narrow part of the uterus (womb) located between the bladder and the rectum. It forms a canal that opens into the vagina, which leads to the outside of the body.


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What is the cervix?

The cervix is the lower, narrow part of the uterus (womb) located between the bladder and the rectum. It forms a canal that opens into the vagina, which leads to the outside of the body.

What are precancerous conditions of the cervix?

Precancerous conditions of the cervix are identified as cells that look abnormal, but are not cancerous at the present time. However, the appearance of these abnormal cells may be the first evidence of cancer that develops years later.

Precancerous changes of the cervix usually do not cause pain and, in general, do not cause any symptoms. They are detected with a pelvic exam or a Pap test.

Squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) is a term that refers to abnormal changes in the cells on the surface of the cervix:

  • Squamous. These cells are the flat cells found on the surface (of the cervix)
  • This means that the abnormal cells are present only in the surface layer of cells
  • This refers to an area of abnormal tissue

According to the National Cancer Institute, changes in these cells can be divided into 2 categories:

  • Low-grade SIL. This refers to early changes in the size, shape, and number of cells that form the surface of the cervix. They may go away on their own, or, with time, may grow larger or become more abnormal, forming a high-grade lesion.
    These changes may also be called mild dysplasia or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 1 (CIN 1).
  • High-grade SIL. This means there are a large number of precancerous cells, and, like low-grade SIL, these changes involve only cells on the surface of the cervix. The cells often do not become cancerous for many months, perhaps years, but without treatment, they will become cancer.
    High-grade lesions may also be called moderate or severe dysplasia, CIN 2 or 3, or carcinoma in situ.

What is cancer of the cervix?

If abnormal cells on the surface of the cervix spread deeper into the cervix, or to other tissues or organs, the disease is then called cervical cancer, or invasive cervical cancer. Cervical cancer occurs most often in women younger than the age of 50. It is different from cancer that begins in other parts of the uterus and requires different treatment. Most cervical cancers are squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas.

The mortality rates for cervical cancer have declined sharply as Pap screenings have become more prevalent. According to the American Cancer Society about 12,340 cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. during 2013. Some researchers estimate that noninvasive cervical cancer (also referred to as carcinoma in situ) is nearly 4 times more common than invasive cervical cancer.

What are risk factors for cervical cancer?

The following have been suggested as risk factors for cervical cancer:

  • Infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is the cause of nearly all cervical cancers. Infection with HPV is most often the result of unprotected sex.
  • Not getting regular Pap tests. Cervical cancer is more common in women who don’t have regular Pap tests. Pap tests help doctors find abnormal cells. These cells can then be removed, which usually prevents cervical cancer.
  • Infection with HIV or other conditions that weaken the immune system. HIV is the precursor to AIDS and can increase your risk of cervical cancer. Taking certain medications that suppress the immune system also increases the risk of cervical cancer.
  • Women who smoke are nearly twice as likely as nonsmokers to have cervical cancer.
  • Women with diets low in fruits and vegetables and those who are overweight are at increased risk for cervical cancer.
  • Chlamydia infection. Some studies have seen a higher risk of cervical cancer in women whose blood test results show evidence of past or current chlamydia infection when compared with women who have normal test results. Chlamydia is spread by sexual contact.
  • Using birth control pills for a long time. Using birth control pills for 5 or more years may slightly increase the risk of cervical cancer, but the risk decreases when women stop using birth control pills.
  • Having many children. Studies suggest that giving birth to 3 or more children may slightly increase the risk of cervical cancer in women with HPV infections.
  • Having sexual intercourse before the age of 18
  • Having many sexual partners, and having partners who have had many partners themselves
  • First full-term pregnancy at a young age. Women who were younger than 17 years when they had their first full-term pregnancy are almost 2 times more likely to get cervical cancer later in life than women who waited until they were 25 years or older to get pregnant.
  • Many low income women do not have access to adequate health care services, including Pap tests. So they are not screened or treated for cervical precancers.
  • Family history of cervical cancer. This cancer may run in some families. A woman’s chance of developing it are 2 to 3 times higher if her mother or sister had cervical cancer than if no one in her family had it.
  • Diethylstilbestrol (DES). DES is a drug that was used to prevent miscarriage between 1940 and 1971. Women whose mothers took DES while pregnant with them develop this cancer more than would normally be expected. The risk seems to be highest in women whose mothers took the drug during their first 16 weeks of pregnancy. (The FDA stopped the use of DES during pregnancy in 1971.)

Can cervical cancer be prevented?

Early detection of cervical problems is the best way to prevent cervical cancer. Routine, annual pelvic exams and Pap tests can detect precancerous conditions that often can be treated before cancer develops. Invasive cancer that does occur would likely be found at an earlier stage. Pelvic exams and Pap tests are used to determine if there are cervical problems. Women who are age 21 or older should have regular checkups, including a pelvic exam and Pap test.

According to the National Institutes of Health:

A pelvic exam and Pap test allow the doctor to detect abnormal changes in the cervix. If an infection is present, it is treated and the Pap test is repeated at a later time. If the exam or Pap test suggests something other than an infection, a repeated Pap test and other tests are performed to determine the problem.

Women who have had a hysterectomy (surgery to remove the uterus, including the cervix) should ask their doctor’s advice about having pelvic exams and Pap tests.

Because certain strains of HPV have been found to cause most cases of cervical cancer, research efforts have focused on developing a vaccine against HPV. Two HPV vaccines have been approved:

  • Gardasil protects against 4 types of the HPV virus — the 2 types of viruses that cause most cervical cancers, and the 2 that cause 90% of genital warts. It protects against other cancers caused by HPV, too, such as cancers and precancers of the vagina, vulva and anus.
  • Cervarix protects against the 2 types of the HPV virus that cause most cervical cancers. It protects against anal cancers, too.

These vaccines can only be used to prevent certain types of HPV infection before a person is infected. They cannot be used to treat an existing HPV infection.

Both vaccines are administered as a series of 3 injections over a 6-month period. To be most effective, one of the vaccines should be given before a person becomes sexually active.

What are the symptoms of cervical cancer?

Symptoms of cervical cancer usually do not appear until abnormal cervical cells become cancerous and invade nearby tissue:

  • The most common symptom is abnormal bleeding, which may:
    • Start and stop between regular menstrual periods.
    • Occur after sexual intercourse, douching, or a pelvic exam.
  • Other symptoms may include:
    • Heavier menstrual bleeding, which may last longer than usual
    • Bleeding after menopause
    • Increased vaginal discharge
    • Pain during intercourse

The symptoms of cervical cancer may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Consult a doctor for diagnosis.

How is cervical cancer diagnosed?

When cervical problems are found during a pelvic examination, or abnormal cells are found through a Pap test, a cervical biopsy may be performed.

There are several types of cervical biopsies that may be used to diagnose cervical cancer, and some of these procedures that can completely remove areas of abnormal tissue may also be used for treatment of precancerous lesions. Some biopsy procedures only require local anesthesia, while others require a general anesthesia. Several types of cervical biopsies include:

  • Loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP). A procedure that uses an electric wire loop to obtain a piece of tissue so it can be examined under a microscope.
  • A procedure that uses an instrument with magnifying lenses called a colposcope, to examine the cervix for abnormalities. If abnormal tissue is found, a biopsy is usually performed (colposcopic biopsy).
  • Endocervical curettage (ECC). A procedure that uses a narrow instrument called a curette to scrape the lining of the endocervical canal. This type of biopsy is usually completed along with the colposcopic biopsy.
  • Cone biopsy (also called conization). A biopsy in which a larger cone-shaped piece of tissue is removed from the cervix by using the loop electrosurgical excision procedure or the cold knife cone biopsy procedure. The cone biopsy procedure may be used as a treatment for precancerous lesions and early cancers.
  • HPV DNA test. A test that detects the presence of cervical HPV infection. The cells are collected as they are for a regular Pap test, but it is not a replacement for a Pap test. The HPV DNA test may be used as a screening test for women over 30 or for women with slightly abnormal Pap test results to determine if further testing or treatment is required.
  • Cold knife cone biopsy. A procedure in which a laser or a surgical scalpel is used to remove a piece of cervical tissue for further examination. This procedure requires the use of general anesthesia.

Treatment for cervical cancer

Specific treatment for cervical cancer will be determined by your doctor based on:

  • Your overall health and medical history
  • Extent of the disease
  • Your tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies
  • Expectations for the course of the disease
  • Your opinion or preference

Treatment may include:

  • Surgery, including:
    • Use of liquid nitrogen, or a probe that is very cold, to freeze and kill cancer cells.
    • Laser surgery. Use of a powerful beam of light, which can be directed to specific parts of the body without making a large incision, to destroy abnormal cells.
    • Surgery to remove the uterus, including the cervix. In some cases, a hysterectomy may be required, particularly if abnormal cells are found inside the opening of the cervix.
  • Radiation therapy
  • Chemotherapy

LEEP or conization may also be used to remove abnormal tissue.

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New statistical update looks at worldwide heart, stroke health

American Heart Association Annual Statistical Update Report

December 17, 2014 Categories: Heart News, Stroke News

DALLAS, December 17, 2014 — For the first time in the 50 years that the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association has released an annual snapshot of heart disease and stroke statistics in the U.S., the new report adds a global view.


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American Heart Association Annual Statistical Update Report

December 17, 2014 Categories: Heart News, Stroke News

DALLAS, December 17, 2014 — For the first time in the 50 years that the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association has released an annual snapshot of heart disease and stroke statistics in the U.S., the new report adds a global view.

Health data compiled from more than 190 countries show heart disease remains the No. 1 global cause of death with 17.3 million deaths each year, according to “Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics — 2015 Update: A Report From the American Heart Association.” That number is expected to rise to more than 23.6 million by 2030, the report found.

Stroke remains the No. 2 cause of death in the world. The stroke death rate — the number of deaths per 100,000 people — went down between 1990 and 2010. However, the number of people having first and recurrent strokes each year went up, reaching 33 million in 2010.

Follow this link for a few key statistics about heart disease, stroke, other cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors, in addition to commonly cited statistics about the association’s research program.

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Save the Date

365-150113-10

 

 

 

32,000 people from Wisconsin reached out to the American Cancer Society for help in 2014 alone.

The lives of your neighbors, your friends, and your loved ones will be changed by what we do—but only if everyone does what they can. Fort HealthCare was there with our team during Relay for Life raising several hundreds of dollars supporting the ACS cause. The 2015 Relay for Life event will take place again on June 13, 2015 in Barrie Park, Fort Atkinson. To participate and for details contact Corinna Bindrim at 920-568-5248 or Corinna.bindrim@forthc.com

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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Run Safely this Winter

It is that time of year when the temperature begins to drop and the days are shorter.  Because of this many people believe it means the morning and evening outdoor runs/walks need to come to an end.  This is very far from the truth, in my personal opinion; it is my favorite time of the year to go for morning runs.  I find it very relaxing and peaceful to be out there in the dark with not many people around.

Because of the darkness though, some guidelines must be followed for safe running or walking.


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News

New Providers at Fort HealthCare

Mary Miller, MD: Family Physician

Dr. Mary Miller returns to the Lake Mills Clinic. Dr. Miller is a family physician who chose to specialize in Family Medicine because of its wide scope of care and knowledge.  This allows her to address the many factors that contribute to a person’s current state of health. “I like to use a common sense approach to healthy living and preventative care.”  Dr. Miller has also completed additional studies in massage therapy, acupressure, reflexology, medicinal herbs, and clinical aromatherapy, expanding her knowledge in these areas so she may offer her patients more options in their overall healthcare.

Lynne Edebohls, APNP: Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Lynne Edebohls, APNP, joins the Cambridge Clinic. “My goals as a nurse practitioner are to help patients and communities find ways to improve and maintain their health in order to live their lives to their full potential.”  Lynne enjoys helping patients take part and remain active with  things they enjoy and that matter most to them.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
January 26 Fort Healthcare Slimdown Challenge
January 17 Healthy Living
January 28 AHA ADVANCE CARDIOVASCULAR LIFE SUPPORT RENEWAL COURSE
January 14 AHA HEARTSAVER FAMILY & FRIENDS CPR
January 17 AHA HEARTSAVER FIRST AID/CPR/AED
January 20 AQUA ZUMBA®
January 19 BASIC LIFE SUPPORT (BLS) FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER CERTIFICATION - RECOGNITION COURSE
January 23 BASIC LIFE SUPPORT (BLS) FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER CERTIFICATION - RENEWAL COURSE
January 7 BODY BLAST
January 8 BROTHER, SISTER: SIBLING-TO-BE
January 26 CRITICAL CARE CLASSES
January 7 GLUTES & ABS
January 13 HAVING HEALTHY BABIES
January 6 MOVIN' AND LOSIN'
January 21 PEDIATRIC ADVANCED LIFE SUPPORT (PALS) - RECOGNITION COURSE
January 31 RED CROSS BABYSITTING
January 7 SKINNY ARMS EXPRESS
January 13 WEIGHT-LOSS SURGERY SEMINAR
January 5 ZUMBA®
January 7 ZUMBA®
January 8 ZUMBA®
Recipes

Butternut-Beef Chili

Ingredients

  • 1 small butternut squash (about 3/4 lb)
  • 3/4 lb ground beef
  • 10 oz. chopped onion, celery and peppers
  • 2 14.5 oz. cans stewed tomatoes
  • 3/4 C water
  • 3/4 t ground cumin
  • 3/4 t chili powder
  • 16 oz. can kidney beans, drained
  • 1 t bottled minced garlic


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Ingredients

  • 1 small butternut squash (about 3/4 lb)
  • 3/4 lb ground beef
  • 10 oz. chopped onion, celery and peppers
  • 2 14.5 oz. cans stewed tomatoes
  • 3/4 C water
  • 3/4 t ground cumin
  • 3/4 t chili powder
  • 16 oz. can kidney beans, drained
  • 1 t bottled minced garlic

DIRECTIONS

Pierce squash with a fork and place on a paper towel in microwave oven; Microwave at high for 2 minutes; Peel and cube squash; Set aside 1 ½ cups cubed squash.

Cook bean and vegetable blend in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat until meat is browned, stirring to crumble. Add squash, tomatoes and remaining five ingredients; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat and simmer 17 minutes or until squash is tender, stirring occasionally.

Recipe makes 4 (2 cup) servings.

Leave Out the beef for a vegitarian Chili

Nutrition

Calories: 310
Fat: 8.1 gm
Saturated Fat: 3.1 gm
Carbohydrate: 37 gm
Cholesterol: 31 mg
Sodium: 981 mg

From ‘Fort HealthCare.com/Recipes’

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