Health365 eNews
September 2014 • Volume 5, Issue 7

Stay fit (and cool) when the weather warms up

Hot summer weather doesn’t need to sideline outdoor exercise. But it does become more important to modify your routine to exercise safely in hot, humid weather.


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Hot summer weather doesn’t need to sideline outdoor exercise. But it does become more important to modify your routine to exercise safely in hot, humid weather.

Exercise Some Caution

The combination of physical activity, hot temperatures and bright sunshine increases stress on the heart and lungs. Not only does the heart have to work harder to deliver blood and oxygen to exercising muscles, but it also must circulate more blood to the skin where it can be cooled off through sweat evaporation. If the humidity is also high, your body can’t be cooled as effectively from its own sweat.

When exercising outdoors during summer months, it becomes important to adjust your routine to the cooler morning or evening hours – to avoid the midday sun. Some other tips to help keep you safe:

  • Stay hydrated. Drink lots of water when you’re exercising, even if you don’t feel thirsty. If your workouts are lengthy, consider alternating sports drinks with your water intake. Such drinks help replace important nutrients you are losing through sweating.
  • Take it easy as you start working out. As your body gets used to the heat, you can gradually increase the intensity and duration of your workouts.
  • Dress appropriately. Light-colored, loose-fitting clothing does a better job of keeping you cool. Dark colors soak up the heat, so avoid wearing them. Wearing a hat with a brim can reduce sun exposure.
  • Use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher. This reduces sunburn risk. Apply liberally 30 minutes before heading outdoors and reapply during extended workouts.
  • Move your workout indoors. A good way to avoid the heat and sun altogether is to exercise indoors. Fort HealthCare offers many group fitness classes during the summer months, and it is a great way to stay motivated and fit.

Signs That the Sun Is Winning

Symptoms that the sun, heat and humidity may be getting to be too much for you during hot-weather exercise could include:

  • Paleness and weakness
  • Heavy sweating
  • Headache, nausea or vomiting
  • Muscle cramps

More severe warning signs include:

  • Dizziness or confusion
  • Red, hot, dry skin with no sweating
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • High body temperature

If you suspect a heat-related illness, stop exercising immediately and get out of the heat. Seek shade or move indoors. Drink plenty of water and cool skin by wetting it with a damp cloth. Seek immediate medical attention if you or an exercise partner becomes faint or confused, or develops a fever higher than 102 degrees Fahrenheit.

Heat-Related Illnesses

  • Heat exhaustion – This is a milder heat-related illness that can develop several days after heat exposure because of unbalanced fluids. Most at risk include the elderly, people with high blood pressure and people working or exercising outdoors.
  • Heat stroke – Also known as hyperthermia, heat stroke is a life-threatening condition. It occurs when the body is unable to regulate temperature, sometimes rising to 106 or more degrees Fahrenheit. Seek emergency care immediately.
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Hydro power!

Nothing beats a nice cool glass of water on a hot day. Water is one of the essential elements needed to keep your body functioning properly. Fortunately, it’s reasonably cheap and easy to find. From filtered tap water to the trendy bottled kind, water serves a variety of purposes, such as regulating body temperature, flushing out toxins and transporting nutrients to your organs. Without it, the body can become dehydrated, leading to a loss of energy, weakness, dizziness and dry mouth.


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Nothing beats a nice cool glass of water on a hot day. Water is one of the essential elements needed to keep your body functioning properly. Fortunately, it’s reasonably cheap and easy to find. From filtered tap water to the trendy bottled kind, water serves a variety of purposes, such as regulating body temperature, flushing out toxins and transporting nutrients to your organs. Without it, the body can become dehydrated, leading to a loss of energy, weakness, dizziness and dry mouth.

Are You Drinking Enough Liquids?

Your body loses about a liter of water each day through respiration, urination and perspiration. When thirst appears, you may already be mildly dehydrated. To replenish fluids and stay hydrated, the average adult needs eight cups of water or other liquid per day.

The Water is Wide

Instead of reaching for soda, alcohol or coffee, which can contribute to dehydration, keep a glass or bottle of water nearby and refill it throughout the day. Fruits and vegetables contain a significant amount of water and are a great way to stay hydrated and help you achieve the recommended daily intake of fluids. In fact, for example, a tomato is 95 percent water.

Not everyone requires the same amount of liquid each day. Athletes, those who live in warm climates, breast-feeding women and people with certain illnesses, such as diarrhea or vomiting, tend to lose more water than the average person and may need to up their fluid intake. The color of one’s urine can help determine if hydration is sufficient, especially in children and older adults. Urine should be clear or light yellow in color. Dark yellow urine may signal dehydration.

If you notice symptoms such as dry mouth and lips, thirst, fatigue or infrequent urination, you may have a mild-to-moderate case of dehydration. If symptoms persist, consult your health care professional about how much water you should be drinking daily.

When Does Dehydration Become Severe?

Drinking extra water may help resolve mild dehydration, but severe cases can be life-threatening and require urgent medical attention. Seek emergency care if you or someone you know shows the following symptoms:

  • Lethargy
  • Fast heart rate
  • Dry mouth
  • No tears when crying
  • Sunken eyes
  • Infrequent or no urination

If severe dehydration is suspected, your doctor may give you intravenous fluids to regulate your fluid intake. He or she can also determine the cause of the dehydration.

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Splash into shape—dive into a summer water workout

Beat the heat with water workouts. Summer is the perfect time to dive into a water workout routine! Whether you’re looking to mix up your routine or you need to burn calories without stressing your joints, a water workout might be the solution—even if you can’t do more than a doggie-paddle. Water workouts are also convenient for those week-long summer vacations at the cabin on the lake.


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Beat the heat with water workouts. Summer is the perfect time to dive into a water workout routine! Whether you’re looking to mix up your routine or you need to burn calories without stressing your joints, a water workout might be the solution—even if you can’t do more than a doggie-paddle. Water workouts are also convenient for those week-long summer vacations at the cabin on the lake.

Consider a water workout if you:

  • are weak or have balance problems
  • suffer from respiratory conditions
  • are in pain due to fibromyalgia or arthritis
  • want to increase bone strength or flexibility

Plus, it’s more fun to exercise in water than on land, and you can be active longer without feeling pain.

Exercising in a pool is ideal for people who are obese or have arthritis. When you move through water, you don’t have to lift your own weight. This puts less stress on your joints. Pushing against water provides natural resistance that can help strengthen your muscles. And, being immersed in water can keep you cool even when you’re working hard.

Water workouts aren’t weight-bearing activities, so they can’t help you increase your bone strength like walking or lifting weights can. But, they can help you become more flexible, increase your range of motion, lose weight and improve your heart health. Try these options:

  • Shallow-water workouts. Experts recommend exercising in water that’s between waist and chest height. The water will be deep enough that you can move your arms under-water comfortably, but not so deep that you’ll have trouble standing squarely in place. Some people wear pool shoes for better traction.
  • Deep-water workouts. Try treading water or "jogging" laps for a whole-body workout. To intensify your routine, wear hand webs, which add resistance as you move your hands through the water. For safety, wear a life jacket.
  • Swimming. Whether you do a fast forward crawl or a slow backstroke, laps can help you get into shape. Start with a 10-minute workout and gradually add more time. For extra intensity, grab a kickboard and propel yourself forward, using your legs.
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Surviving the summer—water safety

Whether they’re sailing, swimming or just splashing around, even most land lubbers appreciate the refreshing joys of spending time near or on the water when the temperature rises. But water fun can also be dangerous. Thousands of people drown each year, and drowning is the second-leading cause of injury-related death among children and teens. Whether you’re hanging 10 or just hanging out, don’t take a vacation from safety.


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Whether they’re sailing, swimming or just splashing around, even most land lubbers appreciate the refreshing joys of spending time near or on the water when the temperature rises. But water fun can also be dangerous. Thousands of people drown each year, and drowning is the second-leading cause of injury-related death among children and teens. Whether you’re hanging 10 or just hanging out, don’t take a vacation from safety.

By the pool

Follow these safeguards at the pool:

  • Supervise children. It only takes a second for a child—even one who can swim—to slip into a pool or gulp too much water.
  • Don’t rely on inflatable "swim aids." They give you and your child a false sense of security and can deflate unexpectedly.
  • Dive only in designated areas. Anywhere else, it’s feet first at all times.
  • Steer clear of drains. Teach children to avoid drains (even covered ones) in pools, spas or hot tubs. Pin up long hair and know where to find the pump’s manual switch.
  • Fence in your pool. Install a four-foot high perimeter fence with self-latching gates. Keep a rescue ring, shepherd’s hook or long, sturdy pole and a phone poolside. After swimming, remove all toys so children aren’t tempted to re-enter.
  • Learn CPR. Adults and kids ages 13 and older should learn this life-saving technique. CPR classes are available at Fort HealthCare.

At the beach

Enjoy the sand and surf, but take these precautions:

  1. Swim in areas supervised by lifeguards. Ask lifeguards about surf, currents and water conditions and avoid swimming past your ability. That sandbar or raft may look a lot closer than it is.
  2. Buddy up. A friend can summon help in an emergency.
  3. Avoid alcohol. Cocktails impair your ability to react to an urgent situation.
  4. Never dive from rafts, docks or piers. Currents and tides change the depth of the ocean floor.
  5. Keep two hands on tots. Even in knee-deep water, breaking waves can send a small child tumbling. Even better, keep little ones in life vests.

On the water

Set a good example for your kids by following smart boating basics:

  1. Develop a float plan. Before boating, tell a responsible person details about where you’re heading and how long you plan to be gone.
  2. Wear Coast Guard-approved life vests when boating. Kids need one even if they’re just by the water’s edge or on the dock.
  3. Avoid tubing or rafting in streams, creeks and rivers after a heavy rain.

Beware of Mother Nature

Don’t let blistering sun and sudden storms take you by surprise. Be prepared with these tips:

  1. Slather on sunscreen. Choose a waterproof formula with an SPF of 15 or greater, apply 30 minutes before sun exposure (even on cloudy days) and reapply every few hours. Stay indoors or keep covered during the intense ultraviolet hours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  2. Duck lightning. When you hear thunder, get out of and away from water immediately. Avoid isolated trees and open fields and head indoors.
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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Icky, icky ticky ticky!

I don’t know about you, but it seems like every time I turn around, someone is talking about how bad the ticks are this year, and with summer here we’re all outdoors more: booking campsites, dusting off your hiking boots and planting the vegetable garden. Ticks are the last thing we want to worry about while enjoying our favorite summer activities, but understanding ticks and taking preventative measures can help reduce anxiety and risk.


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News

Named Top 100 Workplace four years running

Fort HealthCare is pleased to announce that the organization has once again been named a ‘Top 100 Workplace’ by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. The honor was announced in a special "Top 100 Workplaces" section of the newspaper. The section profiles high-performing companies, including Fort HealthCare, which has made the list since 2010.


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Fort HealthCare Scholarship Winners Announced

Fort HealthCare recently provided a total of $10,400 in scholarship money to ten area residents. Fort HealthCare believes that investing in students who have shown academic leadership or community involvement will result in future leaders able to make their communities healthier places.


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Nasco staff view products in action at Fort HealthCare symposium

Over 100 clients and representatives from Fort Atkinson-based Nasco, an international supplier of educational and agricultural supplies, attended a half-day symposium at Fort HealthCare’s Fort Memorial Hospital. Held on June 4, the event allowed Fort HealthCare staff to demonstrate how they use Nasco products to improve staff training and skills, and therefore, the quality of healthcare in the community.


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Audiologist Lori Fish Earns Doctorate Degree

Lori Fish, Au.D., audiologist with Fort HealthCare Ear, Nose & Throat Specialists, has earned a doctorate degree in Audiology, the highest level of training available, after completing all required examinations and clinical studies. This high level of certification offers assurance to the public that the audiologist treating them has achieved the highest recognition of competency in the profession.


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Fort HealthCare begins door-to-door health needs survey

Each year, Fort HealthCare authorizes a comprehensive survey to assess the general public’s individual healthcare status and health-related behaviors. Survey results guide the organization in identifying the need for new and improved services, addressing individual health conditions more effectively and in assessing the overall health of the communities it serves. This year’s survey will again be a door-to-door canvass and occur throughout the Fort HealthCare service area including Jefferson County, Cambridge and Whitewater. The survey process begins during the week of June 10 and will continue until 400 surveys are completed.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
July 6 Hole In One 5K Fun Run/Walk
July 8 Continuing Yoga
July 9 Weigh-Loss Surgery Seminar
July 9 Continuing Yoga
July 9 No Nonsense, Low Impact Workout
July 10 Yoga Express
July 10 Jefferson County Fair
July 11 Brother, Sister: Sibling-to-Be
July 13 Relay For Life – Whitewater
July 13 Cambridge EMS Cannonball Run
July 14 St. Joseph’s School Golf Outing
July 17 AHA Heartsaver Family & Friends CPR
July 17 Rainbow Hospice Care Golf Outing
July 19 Tomorrow’s Hope – 2013 Hope Fest
July 20 AHA Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
July 20 Lakeside Lutheran Warrior Classic Run/Walk
July 26 On My Own at Home
July 27 Lake Ripley Ride
July 27 Fort Atkinson Youth Triathlon
July 29 Zumba
July 30 Rusty Hinges
July 31 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED
July 31 Zumba
Recipes

Country Potato Salad

From EatingWell, this updated picnic potato salad gets subtle flavor from smoked ham. If you can find them, small, thin-skinned early potatoes are best in this salad.



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From EatingWell, this updated picnic potato salad gets subtle flavor from smoked ham. If you can find them, small, thin-skinned early potatoes are best in this salad.

Prep time: 40 minutes
Ready in: 60 minutes
Servings: 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds small potatoes, preferably heirloom
  • 1 cup chopped celery
  • 2 ounces smoked ham, sliced into strips
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives, or scallions
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint, or dill
  • 3/4 cup nonfat buttermilk
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon peanut or canola oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 2 large hard-boiled eggs, (see Tip), peeled and coarsely chopped
  • Preparation

    1. Place potatoes in a large saucepan, cover with water and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium and cook, partially covered, until just tender, 12 to 20 minutes, depending on their size. Drain and let cool for about 15 minutes.
    2. When the potatoes are cool enough to handle, taste a bit of potato skin—if it’s bitter or tough, peel the potatoes. Otherwise, leave the skins on. Cut the potatoes into bite-size pieces and put them in a large salad bowl.
    3. Add celery, ham, parsley, chives (or scallions) and mint (or dill) to the potatoes. Toss to combine. Add buttermilk, lemon juice, oil, salt and pepper; stir to combine. Gently stir in chopped egg. Serve at room temperature or chilled.

    Nutrition

    • Per serving (1 cup) : 138 Calories; 4 g Fat; 1 g Sat; 2 g Mono; 58 mg Cholesterol; 20 g Carbohydrates; 6 g Protein; 2 g Fiber; 272 mg Sodium; 643 mg Potassium

    Tips & Notes

    • Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate for up to 1 day. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired.
    • Tip: To hard-boil eggs: Place eggs in a single layer in a saucepan; cover with water. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low and cook at the barest simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat, pour out hot water and cover the eggs with cold water. Let stand until cool enough to handle before peeling.
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