Health365 eNews
September 2014 • Volume 5, Issue 3

Yummy, Yummy for Tiny Tummies

Once your baby moves beyond those first weeks of round-the-clock feedings, making sure your baby has the proper nutrition can get a bit more complicated. Breast milk or formula was all baby needed for the first six months of life.


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Once your baby moves beyond those first weeks of round-the-clock feedings, making sure your baby has the proper nutrition can get a bit more complicated. Breast milk or formula was all baby needed for the first six months of life. Over the next year to 18 months, though, expect a bit more adventure on the feeding front. Introducing solids, trying out table foods and weaning can leave many parents unsure about their little one’s nutrition. Starting good habits early helps set the stage for a lifetime of healthy eating.

Table talk
Healthy eating from the start, try some of these tips when starting solids:

  • Offer one new food at a time. Use single ingredient foods and wait a few days to watch for signs of allergy (rash, diarrhea, increased gas or fussiness) before trying another.
  • Start with rice cereal first and go through the grains available in your area. Veggies should be next, followed by fruits and then meats.
  • Limit juice, offer water if any other beverages are needed, such as during hot weather.
  • Use a rubber-tipped spoon to start. Don’t put cereal or food in your baby’s bottle. This can cause babies to eat too fast, leading to overeating, and doesn’t teach them to eat solids.
  • Pay attention to cues that baby is full. Your baby may turn away from the spoon,
lean backward or refuse to open his or her mouth. Resist trying to force another bite.
  • Keep trying new tastes and textures. At about 8 months, your baby’s probably ready for chunkier and coarser foods that require more chewing, such as mashed potatoes, yogurt, some dry cereals, light crackers, cottage cheese, shredded cheese, small pieces of chicken, ripe banana, well-cooked pasta and well-cooked or canned fruits and vegetables. You may also choose to fork-mash, cut up or grind whatever food the rest of the family is eating.
  • Always monitor for changes in behavior, skin and bowel patterns with dietary changes.

Making mealtimes work
During your child’s second year, his or her eating habits will evolve to be more like your own. Draw the high chair up to the table so he or she can join the rest of the family and try some of these strategies:

  • Establish a routine. Offer three meals and two to three snacks a day on a regular schedule so that your child learns to expect food at certain times.
  • Accept a missed meal. Toddlers may skip meals from time to time simply because they’re not hungry. Resist the temptation to keep offering something else. Don’t push food on a child who isn’t hungry.
  • Allow some control. Don’t make mealtimes a power struggle. You decide what healthy foods to offer, and your child decides which to eat, how much to eat and whether to eat at all.
  • Start the sippy cup. Offer whole milk (after age 1), breast milk, formula, water or juice in a trainer cup with a lid and spout. It may take several weeks before the cup becomes more than a new toy, but using a cup helps improve hand-to-mouth coordination and can pave the way for weaning.
  • Use whole milk. Continue to breastfeed if you wish, but if you use cow’s milk after
age 1, opt for whole milk instead of lower-fat versions until age 2.
  • Be persistent with new foods. Children often need at least 10 exposures to a new food before they’ll accept it. So keep offering broccoli, peas or any other foods about which they may seem hesitant.

  • Limit sweets and empty calories. Little tummies can only hold so much, so serve foods packed with the nutrients they need.

Remember to set a good example. Your baby will develop and model many food preferences and habits after your own.

Once your baby moves beyond those first weeks of round-the-clock feedings, making sure your baby has the proper nutrition can get a bit more complicated. Breast milk or formula was all baby needed for the first six months of life. Over the next year to 18 months, though, expect a bit more adventure on the feeding front. Introducing solids, trying out table foods and weaning can leave many parents unsure about their little one’s nutrition. Starting good habits early helps set the stage for a lifetime of healthy eating.

What’s off limits?
Remember to keep solid food items pea-sized or smaller and that not every food is suitable for young children. Avoid feeding:

  • Cow’s milk, eggs, citrus or honey before age 1
  • Peanuts, peanut butter, fish or shellfish before age 3
  • Choking hazards like whole grapes, hot dogs, hard candy, raisins, popcorn, raw carrots, nuts or large pieces of meat before age 3

If you have questions about what to feed your toddler, bring it up to your provider at your next Well Child visit. Proper nutrition is critical in these early years and can set your child up for a lifetime of good choices.

Eating right is essential to keeping a body running at its best. During National Nutrition Month©, Fort HealthCare and the Academy of Nutrition offer a reminder to build an eating plan with lifestyle and nutritional needs in mind through the "Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day" promotion. As part of this public education campaign, Fort HealthCare dieticians will be visiting six local grocery stores during the month of March. Customers can sample fresh fruits and vegetables, get healthy recipes, have blood pressure checked and ask nutrition-related questions. A complete list of dates and locations can be found here.

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8 Excellent Reasons To Get Moving


Looking for the fountain of youth? Lace up your sneakers and get moving. You won’t find the secret of living long and healthfully in a pill, a potion, a lotion or a magic spell. But you will find yourself with more energy, a better outlook and, most important, better health by making physical activity part of your daily schedule. Need more incentive? Check out this list of benefits.


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Looking for the fountain of youth? Lace up your sneakers and get moving. You won’t find the secret of living long and healthfully in a pill, a potion, a lotion or a magic spell. But you will find yourself with more energy, a better outlook and, most important, better health by making physical activity part of your daily schedule. Need more incentive? Check out this list of benefits.

  1. Reduces heart disease risk
    Numerous studies have shown that regular exercise significantly reduces the risk of heart attack. Exercise protects against heart disease by improving your cholesterol profile and reducing your triglyceride levels. These changes help cleanse the blood of fats that can block arteries. Exercise also lowers blood pressure, which reduces physical stress on the heart.
  2. Prevents osteoporosis
    The development of the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis can be slowed through regular weight-bearing exercises like walking, jogging, stair climbing and aerobics.
  3. Controls diabetes
    People with diabetes either don’t produce enough insulin, a hormone the body needs to make use of sugar, or their bodies don’t respond normally to it. Their resulting high blood-sugar levels can cause many serious complications. Exercise reduces the body’s need for insulin, which improves blood-sugar levels. Studies show that adult-onset diabetes is much less likely to develop in active people than in non-active people. For those who have the disease, regular exercise may help reduce or eliminate the need for medication.
  4. Fights obesity
    Combined with a low-fat diet that provides the right number of calories, regular exercise helps prevent obesity. Exercise is part of every effective weight-loss program. When excess weight is dropped, the risks for heart disease, hypertension, diabetes and osteoarthritis drop along with it.
  5. Increases flexibility
    Regular exercise strengthens muscles and keeps joints, tendons and ligaments more flexible, allowing active people to move freely and easily.
  6. Elevates mood
    Health experts say exercise can have a positive effect on a person’s mood, including a reduction of anxiety and tension. It even shows promise in easing symptoms of depression.
  7. Reduces hot flashes
    While there isn’t much research to prove that exercise reduces hot flashes, there’s reason to believe that exercise may help menopausal women cope with the discomfort of this symptom. By improving circulation, exercise can make the body more tolerant of temperature extremes and able to cool down more quickly. Exercise also strengthens the endocrine system, so that the adrenal glands and the ovaries function more efficiently.
  8. Lessens discomforts of pregnancy
    Regular aerobic exercise during pregnancy improves circulation, which improves the transportation of oxygen and nutrients to the fetus. Exercise can also lessen some of pregnancy’s discomforts, such as backache, tiredness, fluid retention and hemorrhoids. Plus, the endurance that exercise builds helps women cope with labor.

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Colon Cancer Screening: Virtual vs. Traditional Colonoscopy


Colon Cancer Awareness Month is here and Fort HealthCare encourages those age 50 and over to have a colonoscopy. Seven out of 10 people age 50 years or older have not had a colonoscopy, primarily due to fears. Information and education can help alleviate many of the unknowns associated with colonoscopies. There are a number of options available to patients, but often questions arise about the differences between virtual and traditional colonoscopies.


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Colon Cancer Awareness Month is here and Fort HealthCare encourages those age 50 and over to have a colonoscopy. Seven out of 10 people age 50 years or older have not had a colonoscopy, primarily due to fears. Information and education can help alleviate many of the unknowns associated with colonoscopies. There are a number of options available to patients, but often questions arise about the differences between virtual and traditional colonoscopies.

Virtual Colonoscopy
During a virtual screening, a CT scan is used to produce pictures of the colon and rectum. A computer then assembles these pictures into detailed images that can show polyps and other abnormalities. Because it is less invasive than standard colonoscopy and sedation is not needed, virtual colonoscopy may cause less discomfort and take less time to perform. As with standard colonoscopy, a thorough cleansing of the colon is necessary before this test. Whether virtual colonoscopy can reduce the number of deaths from colorectal cancer is not yet known. 

While there are obvious advantages with the virtual method, a major fallback is that if polyps are found, the patient must still come in for a traditional colonoscopy to have them removed. Also, preparation for the procedure is more cumbersome, since the colon must be even more clear for the pictures to be accurate. Medicare does not cover the virtual colonoscopy.

Traditional Colonoscopy
In this test, the rectum and entire colon are examined using a thin, lighted instrument called a colonoscope. During a colonoscopy, precancerous and cancerous growths throughout the colon can be found and either removed or biopsied. A thorough cleansing of the colon is necessary before this test, and most patients receive some form of sedation. 

Because of the sedation, patients have no memory of the procedure. During a traditional colonoscopy, polyps are easily removed so there is no secondary procedure needed. Since colon cancer can develop in as little as five years from the formation of a polyp, it is important to have polyps removed in a timely manner, possibly making the traditional option even more effective.

Patients are encouraged to speak with their doctor about the best procedure for them. Medical needs may vary based on personal history, "Screening colonoscopies are recommended for everyone, beginning at the age of 50. If no polyps are found, repeat exams are recommended every 10 years. If polyps are found the repeat interval is every three to five years depending on the size, number and microscopic appearance of the polyps removed," says Fort HealthCare general surgeon Jonathon McLaughlin. He then adds, "If an immediate family member has had colon cancer, the age of a first colonoscopy should be at an age 10 years younger than the age at which the family member was diagnosed with cancer. Repeat exams in this situation are never more than five years apart, even when no polyps are found."

As part of Fort HealthCare’s commitment to quality healthcare, new equipment for performing colonoscopies was installed at Fort Memorial Hospital. The Olympus Endoscopy equipment provides high-definition technology for a better picture and higher resolution. This means that surgeons are able to see more clearly any abnormalities that may exist in the colon. This technology places Fort HealthCare at the same level as big city hospitals using similar technology.

A colonoscopy is a quick, easy outpatient procedure that can be vital to a healthy, happy and long life. The process usually lasts only 30 minutes to one hour, and only occasionally causes a small degree of discomfort. Risks can include infection, perforation of the bowel, bleeding or an adverse reaction to medication; however, risks are extremely rare and are minimal when compared with those associated with colon cancer. Patients should discuss risks and benefits of a colonoscopy with their doctor, especially if there are questions or concerns.

To book an appointment, call Fort HealthCare Surgical Associates at (920) 563-7900 or the Lake Mills Clinic at (920) 648-7683.

More information, including a 45-minute seminar on colonoscopies, can be found at FortHealthCare.com/Colonoscopy. Fort HealthCare participates in most insurance plans. Many insurances offer coverage for most common, age specific screening tests, including colonoscopies. Please consult with your insurance provider if you have questions about coverage. Visit FortHealthCare.com/Insurance for more information.

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Back to Basics for Healthy Weight Loss


While there are plenty of ways to lose weight, maintaining your weight loss over the long term is often unsuccessful. If you’ve lost and found the same pounds several times before, it’s probably time to go back to the basics of a healthy weight:


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While there are plenty of ways to lose weight, maintaining your weight loss over the long term is often unsuccessful. If you’ve lost and found the same pounds several times before, it’s probably time to go back to the basics of a healthy weight:

  • Prevention of weight gain or stopping recent weight gain can improve your health.
  • Health can improve with relatively minor weight reduction (5 percent to 10 percent of body weight).
  • Adopting a healthy lifestyle – eating smarter and moving more – can improve your health status even if you don’t lose any weight at all.

If you want to maintain a healthy weight for the rest of your life, it’s all about energy balance.

Here are three basic steps for success:

  1. Make Smart Choices from Every Food Group – Your body needs the right fuel for your hectic, stress-filled schedule. The best way to get what you need is to enjoy a wide variety of nutrient-rich foods that are packed with energy, protein, vitamins and minerals from all the MyPlate food groups.

    Where can you find these smart choices? When you go shopping, look to the four corners of your supermarket:

    • Fruits and vegetables from the produce aisles
    • Whole grains from the bakery
    • Low-fat milk products from the dairy case
    • Lean proteins from the meat/fish/poultry department

    Here’s an easy way to eat more produce: Enjoy one fruit and one vegetable as a snack each day. It’s quick, easy, tasty and very nutrient-rich.

  2. Get the Most Nutrition from Your Calories – The biggest nutrition challenge for most Americans is posed by high-fat, high-sugar foods and drinks, such as snack foods, candies and sugary drinks. Eating smarter does not mean you have to immediately go sugar-free and fat-free. You can make a big difference in your calorie intake by just eating and drinking smaller portions and by making empty calorie choices less often.

    The key is to moderate, not eliminate. Watching portion sizes is an easy way to cut back without cutting out. If you want to cut back on sugar, drink water instead of sugary drinks and eat desserts less often.

  3. Balance Food and Physical Activity– What you eat is just one part of the energy balance equation. The other is your physical activity. Most of us take in more calories than we spend on our daily activities. Finding a healthier balance means fitting more activity into your day. The minimum for good health is 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity each day. To reach a healthy weight, you may need to be physically active longer (60 minutes a day) or participate in more intense activities. How much activity do you usually get now? If it’s only 15 minutes, try adding a 15- or 20-minute walk during your lunch break.

Over 1500 individuals are participating in Fort HealthCare’s 2013 Slimdown Challenge, a free competition encouraging local residents to engage in exercise and healthy nutrition with a goal of reduced weight and improved emotional health. The ultimate goal is to improve the health and well-being of our community, as described in the Fort HealthCare mission statement. The 12-week challenge began February 18 and winners will be announced on May 15, 2013.

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Clearing The Air: Don't Let COPD Take Your Breath Away


Day and night, our lungs expand and contract without needing any reminders. In fact, most of the time we don’t even realize we’re breathing. However, for those who suffer from emphysema and chronic bronchitis, breathing is a constant concern. Because both conditions commonly occur together, they’ve been classified under the term chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The more you know about COPD, the earlier you’ll be able to spot symptoms and get treatment.


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Day and night, our lungs expand and contract without needing any reminders. In fact, most of the time we don’t even realize we’re breathing. However, for those who suffer from emphysema and chronic bronchitis, breathing is a constant concern. Because both conditions commonly occur together, they’ve been classified under the term chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The more you know about COPD, the earlier you’ll be able to spot symptoms and get treatment.

Worsens slowly
COPD develops slowly, causing shortness of breath that worsens over time. Because the onset is gradual, you may not think you have a problem.

For those suffering from COPD, tiny breathing sacs in the lungs called alveoli become scarred. The breathing tubes–called bronchioles–thicken and narrow, and extra mucus develops in the airways. It becomes harder to breathe out because air becomes trapped in the lungs.

Emphysema and bronchitis differ from each other in several ways. In emphysema, the walls of the alveoli become inflamed. As the disease progresses, the damage to the alveoli increases and they lose their elasticity. Pockets of dead air form, making it difficult to exhale. In chronic bronchitis, the structure of the airways changes so that airflow is diminished. A person with chronic bronchitis has a chronic cough and produces excess mucus.

Causes of COPD
Smoking is the main cause in nine out of 10 cases of COPD. Other causes include exposure to secondhand smoke, fumes, dust and other environmental irritants. Other irritants that can increase the risk for COPD include toxic chemicals, such as silica or cadmium, industrial smoke and dust. Occupations that can expose workers to these irritants include miners, grain farmers, and cooks.

Symptoms
The broad symptoms of COPD include shortness of breath that worsens over time, a cough that produces phlegm, and wheezing.

Symptoms of emphysema usually appear in heavy smokers by their mid-50s. They become short of breath with even light exertion, but they may only have a minor cough. By the time symptoms appear, people with emphysema have lost a significant portion of their normal lung tissue.

Symptoms of chronic bronchitis include coughing with excess mucus and frequent bacterial infections. To be diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, you must have a cough that lasts for at least three months of the year and continues over the course of two consecutive years. The other main symptom is shortness of breath, but it is not as severe while at rest as with emphysema. As the disease progresses, symptoms often force a person to sleep sitting up. Females are more than twice as likely to be diagnosed with chronic bronchitis as males.

Treatment can make COPD easier to live with, but the only way to change the course of the disease is to stop smoking and avoid exposure to secondhand smoke and other environmental irritants. 

Warning signs
Don’t take breathing for granted. Talk with your doctor if you notice any of these signs:

  • Coughing that lasts longer than the cough you usually get with a cold. A cough that lasts longer than that also could be acute bronchitis. Coughing with acute bronchitis can last up to a month.
  • Coughing or trouble breathing when you move. You should be able to climb a flight of stairs without coughing or being short of breath.
  • Excess sputum or phlegm. If you’re producing the same amount of sputum as you might for a bad cold, but it continues for weeks or a month, see your doctor.
  • Wheezing. This can be a sign of asthma. The classic signs of an asthma attack are coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath.
  • A feeling of tightness or fullness in the chest.
  • Colds that often spread to the chest. People with COPD and asthma face a greater risk for infection in the bronchial tubes and lungs.
  • Increasing trouble breathing around certain irritants. These include smoke, dust, pollen, and air pollution.

If diagnosed with COPD, a treatment plan will likely include several forms based on the symptoms and the underlying cause. Treatments can include medications to relieve symptoms and control inflammation in the lungs. Oxygen therapy may also be prescribed if your blood contains too little oxygen.

Fort HealthCare is celebrating pulmonary awareness month on Thursday, March 14! Join us from 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. in the Cardiac Rehab Department for free screenings (Pulmonary Function Testing, Blood Pressure and Body Fat), demonstrations (Chair Yoga and Strengthening) and presentations by Dr. Donald Williams and Lori Sache, Respiratory Therapist.

Fort HealthCare’s pulmonary rehabilitation program consists of progressive exercise to strengthen muscles and increase endurance as well as provide emotional support to those suffering from COPD. The team, led by Dr. Donald Williams, includes a respiratory therapist, exercise psychologist, registered nurse, registered dietitian, your personal physician, social worker and occupational therapist. If you like to learn more about the program, please call (920) 568-5349, between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

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Diabetes: Are You At Risk?


Diabetes is a serious disease that strikes nearly 26 million children and adults in the United States, and a quarter of them-7 million-do not even know they have it. An additional 79 million, or one in three American adults, have prediabetes, which puts them at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes.


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Diabetes is a serious disease that strikes nearly 26 million children and adults in the United States, and a quarter of them-7 million-do not even know they have it. An additional 79 million, or one in three American adults, have prediabetes, which puts them at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes is a condition in which your body has trouble using a sugar called glucose for energy. As a result, the sugar level in your blood becomes too high. Diabetes is a chronic (lifelong) condition. Left untreated, it can result in major health problems.

What Puts You At Risk?
Everyone should be aware of the risk factors for type 2 diabetes. People who are overweight, under active (living a sedentary lifestyle) and over the age of 45 should consider themselves at risk for the disease. African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders and people who have a family history of the disease also are at an increased risk for type 2 diabetes.

Unfortunately, diagnosis often comes 7 to 10 years after the onset of the disease, after disabling and even deadly complications have had time to develop. Therefore, early diagnosis is critical to successful treatment and delaying or preventing some of its complications such as heart disease, blindness, kidney disease, stroke, amputation and death.

Studies have shown that type 2 diabetes can often be prevented or delayed by losing just 7% of body weight through regular physical activity (30 minutes a day, five days a week) and healthy eating.

Signs of Diabetes
Do any of the following questions apply to you?

  • Do you feel tired all the time?
  • Do you urinate often?
  • Do you feel thirsty or hungry all the time?
  • Are you losing weight for no reason?
  • Do cuts and bruises heal slowly?
  • Do you have numbness or tingling in your fingers or toes?

Why Worry About Diabetes?

  • Diabetes keeps your body from turning food into energy.
  • Diabetes can cause problems with your eyes, kidneys, nerves, and feet. It can also hurt your heart and blood vessels.
  • Once you get diabetes, it won’t go away.

The American Diabetes Association encourages everyone to participate in Diabetes Alert Day, a one-day "wake-up call" by assessing your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. On March 25, anyone can come to Fort Memorial Hospital to have a free blood glucose screening and have their risk for diabetes assessed by certified diabetes educators from Fort HealthCare’s ADA-recognized program for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Screenings will be held on the first floor near the Volunteer office from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. No registration is required for this free event.

Fort HealthCare’s diabetes education program is available to help both newly diagnosed and those who have been living with diabetes. As part of the diabetic education program, individuals with diabetes and those who support them can attend support groups, speakers and one-on-one sessions. Visit FortHealthCare.com/Diabetes for more information.

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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Breastfeeding Benefits for Both

Breastfeeding is one of the most natural and beneficial ways a mother can care for her baby.  The experience of breastfeeding is very special and while some may feel breastfeeding is unnecessary, it provides endless value for your child, and is just as rewarding for you, too.  It may be challenging at first, but you and your baby can succeed and find value in the numerous benefits of breastfeeding.


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News

Fort HealthCare Promotes National Nutrition Month


Eating right is essential to keeping a body running at its best. During National Nutrition Month®, Fort HealthCare and the Academy of Nutrition and offer a reminder to build an eating plan with lifestyle and nutritional needs in mind through the "Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day" promotion.


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Varicose Veins Treatment: Free Seminar


Bill Kontny, MD of Fort HealthCare Surgical Associates is hosting a free informational seminar about effective treatment for venous reflux disease (varicose veins) on Tuesday, March 12 starting at 6:00 p.m. in the Fort Memorial Hospital Auditorium. The hospital is located at 611 Sherman Avenue East in Fort Atkinson. Individuals are invited to register for this free event online at FortHealthCare.com/Classes, or by calling 920-568-5244.


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Local Brownie Troop Donates Blankets to Fort HealthCare Pediatric Patients


On February 22, Girl Scouts around the world considered how they can “Help Save Children,” the theme of this year’s World Thinking Day.¬†Brownie Troop #2637 from Jefferson made blankets for children, which were donated to Fort HealthCare’s pediatric patients.¬†Included with the blankets were notes for blanket recipients.


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Geri Manikin Donation Made to Fort HealthCare Simulation Lab


Following a February 5 Chamber of Commerce open house, the Fort HealthCare Simulation Lab accepted the generous donation of a GERI manikin. This new manikin joins two others already housed in the Simulation Lab, but provides a more realistic opportunity for nurses and other healthcare professionals to practice over 30 various skills, including tracheostomy and catheter insertion on elderly patients. The GERI manikin was donated by Arthur and Nancy Nesbitt.


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Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Program Launches, Partnership Between Fort HealthCare and PADA


The Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Program at Fort HealthCare began providing confidential services to sexual assault victims on Friday, February 8. Prior to that date, Jefferson County had no facility offering these services. Victims were referred to other hospitals, in more urban communities. SANE is provided in partnership with People Against Domestic and Sexual Abuse (PADA), Jefferson County’s program for domestic and sexual abuse victims.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
March 11 Free Health Screening
March 11 Cardio Kick Boxing
March 11 Core, Balance, and Stretch
March 11 Lower Body Sculpt
March 12 Boot Camp
March 12 Glutes and Abs
March 12 Healthy-Steps
March 12 Skinny Arms Express
March 12 Varicose Veins Information Seminar
March 12 Weight-Loss Surgery Seminar
March 13 Rusty Hinges Water Exercise Class
March 13 Step Aerobics
March 14 Boot Camp
March 14 Glutes and Abs
March 14 Healthy-Steps
March 14 Skinny Arms Express
March 15 Boot Camp Express
March 15 Cardio Kickboxing Express
March 16 AHA Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
March 18 Beginning Yoga
March 18 Cardio Kickboxing
March 18 Continuing Yoga
March 18 Core, Balance, and Stretch
March 18 Lower Body Sculpt
March 19 Boot Camp
March 19 Continuing Yoga
March 19 Glutes and Abs
March 19 Healthy-Steps
March 19 No Nonsense, Low-Impact Workout
March 19 Skinny Arms Express
March 20 Rusty Hinges Water Exercise Class
March 20 Step Aerobics
March 20 Yoga Express
March 21 Boot Camp
March 21 Glutes and Abs
March 21 Healthy-Steps
March 21 Skinny Arms Express
March 22 Boot Camp Express
March 22 Cardio Kickboxing Express
March 23 On My Own at Home
March 25 Beginning Yoga
March 25 Cardio Kickboxing
March 25 Continuing Yoga
March 25 Core, Balance, and Stretch
March 25 Lower Body Sculpt
March 26 Boot Camp
March 26 Continuing Yoga
March 26 Glutes and Abs
March 26 No Nonsense, Low-Impact Workout
March 26 Skinny Arms Express
March 27 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED
March 27 Rusty Hinges Water Exercise Class
March 27 Step Aerobics
March 27 Yoga Express
March 28 Boot Camp
March 28 Glutes and Abs
March 28 Skinny Arms Express
March 29 Boot Camp Express
March 29 Cardio Kickboxing Express
March 14 Pulmonary Awareness Celebration
Recipes

BBQ Chicken and Blue Cheese Pizza


Ingredients

  • 1 (8 ounce) prebaked thin pizza crust
  • 1/3 cup barbecue sauce
  • 1 1/2 cups shredded skinless, boneless rotisserie chicken breast
  • 1/2 cup vertically sliced red onion
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped yellow bell pepper
  • 1/2 cup (2 ounces) crumbled blue cheese
  • 2 plum tomatoes, thinly sliced (about 1/4 pound)


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Ingredients

  • 1 (8 ounce) prebaked thin pizza crust
  • 1/3 cup barbecue sauce
  • 1 1/2 cups shredded skinless, boneless rotisserie chicken breast
  • 1/2 cup vertically sliced red onion
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped yellow bell pepper
  • 1/2 cup (2 ounces) crumbled blue cheese
  • 2 plum tomatoes, thinly sliced (about 1/4 pound)

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 500°
  2. Place pizza crust on a baking sheet. Spread sauce over crust, leaving a 1/2 –inch border. Top with chicken and remaining ingredients. Bake 10 minutes or until cheese melts and crust is crisp. Cut into 12 wedges.
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Phone: 920.568.5000 | www.forthealthcare.com