Fort Memorial Hospital
611 Sherman Avenue East
Fort Atkinson, WI 53538
(920) 568-5000 | La linea de mensajes: (920) 568-5001


As Prescribed Blog



As Prescribed Blog

Five things new moms should know about breastfeeding

Beverly Haferman RN, LC Beverly Haferman RN, LC August 24, 2017 0 Comments Obstetrics

When you are having a baby, you are faced with many questions which can seem overwhelming.  One of the most important is, how you are going to feed your baby? All governing health agencies recommend breastfeeding as the best form of nutrition for your baby, and so does Fort HealthCare. Of course, the transition to breastfeeding is not always easy, so we  will help you in every way to make this a positive and successful experience.

Here are 5 things to remember:

  1. You will provide only one teaspoon of milk per feeding for the first 2-3 days of your infant’s life.  All infants have enough fluid to last for 2-3 days but it is important to remember that frequent early feedings will help your milk come in sooner and more abundantly.  We recommend feeding per infant cues, but at least 8 times daily.
  2. Infants are hardwired to breastfeed.  We can help this process by giving them early and unlimited access to the breast.  We initiate this with the use of skin-skin as soon as the infant is born.  This wakens the infant’s reflexes and we see infants breastfeeding more often and longer.
  3. Your infant should stay with you.  Your baby knows you and wants to be with you.  He will know you by smell and sound. By staying close to you he will be happier and you will learn to read his cues.  Babies breastfeed better when Mom recognizes their feeding cues and puts to breast.
  4. Your baby should not be given a bottle or pacifier without talking to a lactation consultant.  They may interfere with your baby's ability to latch.
  5. Breastfeeding should not hurt.  If you are having pain past the initial latch, call for help.  Remember this is new for you and your baby.  Don’t expect perfection.

Breastfeeding gives your new baby the very best start. It supplies food, comfort, and love. Experts agree: Breastfeeding is the healthiest choice for babies during the first year of life and beyond. It’s healthy for Mom, too. Breast milk has antibodies in it that helps infants’ immune systems fight off sickness, and contributes to lowering children’s risk for developing asthma, allergies, colic, and obesity later on in life. Breastfeeding may be challenging at first. But you and your baby can succeed together.

Fort HealthCare is a Baby-Friendly™ Facility. We are the 369th hospital in the United States to achieve this, and the 10th hospital in Wisconsin. The Baby-Friendly™ Hospital Initiative is a global program that was launched by the World Health Organization and UNICEF in 1991 to encourage and recognize hospitals and birthing centers that offer an optimal level of care for infant feeding and mother-and-baby bonding. The initiative outlines very specific guidelines that hospitals must follow to maintain this accreditation, many of which have always been routine for Fort HealthCare. Here, you will find an encouraging and caring environment where you and your baby are the center of our care, and breastfeeding is encouraged to take place whenever necessary. All of our staff that care for mothers and infants are specially-trained in breastfeeding and lactation management.

Encouraging breastfeeding is central to the Baby-Friendly™ initiative, as several advantages have been studied and are recognized to be essential in working toward the optimal health of mother other and baby. At Fort HealthCare, breastfeeding is discussed all throughout pregnancy, and more information is presented both in person and through childbirth preparation classes held at the hospital on an ongoing basis.

If you are having difficulty breastfeeding, call (920-568-5300) one of our five certified Lactation Consultants to provide counseling. Often, simple adjustments can make a world of difference. Visit to learn more about how we're helping you have a healthier baby.