Fort Memorial Hospital
611 Sherman Avenue East
Fort Atkinson, WI 53538
(920) 568-5000 | La linea de mensajes: (920) 568-5001

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CareLine Program

The CareLine (PERS) unit allows individuals to remain in their homes, perform the normal activities of daily living and avoid losing their independence. The system gives peace of mind to both the subscriber and their family. The quick response time minimizes the risk of further injuries that can occur when people do not receive immediate assistance after a fall or major incident.

How it works

Each subscriber has a communicator unit and a portable waterproof button that is worn on a cord around the neck or strap around the wrist. The user can be anywhere inside the home, in the yard, or even on the go with our Mobile Care unit, to benefit from the program. A fall detector waterproof button is an option for subscribers who fall frequently, or have concerns about falling such as weakness, dizziness, or walking difficulties. The fall detector button can detect a fall automatically and immediately contact emergency help for you without the need to physically press the button. Our Mobile Care unit includes a built in fall detector and GPS location services. In most cases, subscribers do not need a phone for CareLine service.

Although CareLine’s normal focus is on the frail and elderly, the service may be utilized by all ages, including latchkey children and pregnant women confined to their homes during a difficult pregnancy.

At the first sign of medical distress, the subscriber pushes the button. This automatically sends an electronic message to our medical alert monitoring service. Trained personnel can quickly find out if you’ve experienced a problem. If the subscriber is having a problem, responders whose names have been supplied by the subscriber. Subscribers provide the names and telephone numbers of those selected to respond in the event of an emergency. Typically, responders are chosen according to their everyday availability and close proximity. These responders are usually relatives, friends or neighbors.

In addition to the list of responders, the monitoring center staff will have a brief medical history of each subscriber and their private physician’s name on file. They will contact the necessary parties such as police, rescue unit and private physician as appropriate.

Getting started

The program is coordinated through the hospital’s Volunteer Services Department, utilizing Fort HealthCare Partners. There is a one-time set-up fee in addition to a nominal monthly fee for the CareLine service.

For more information, call (920) 568-5275 Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m

Tele-Care program offers security and friendship

Imagine that changes in your health have caused you or your family to be concerned about your ability to live independently. In the event of a worsening medical condition, one’s ability to stay in the home they’ve lived in for years can be compromised. If only there was a service that could check on you each day and ask, quite simply “Is everything OK?”

The Fort HealthCare Partners Organization offers such a service. The Partners extend the Tele-Care Program to all members of the community regardless of age or level of illness. Tele-Care is a free service that provides a daily phone contact for persons who may benefit from such a service. Fort HealthCare volunteers call subscribers each Monday through Friday mornings between 9:00 and 10:00 a.m.; weekends and holidays excluded. If a Tele-Care subscriber can not be reached, a neighbor or relative is asked to check on the individual to make sure that they are well.

Recognizing that most people still have active lives regardless of age or illness, subscribers may choose an approximate time each day that they would like to be called. If an individual plans to be away from home, even for a day, they can simply tell the volunteer caller in advance. A voice mail message can be left with the volunteer callers if pre-arrangements for a planned absence have not been made.

In addition to making sure the Tele-Care subscriber is well, the calls also provide a social connection for people who may not get a lot of phone calls or visitors. Reminiscing about the “good old days,” gardening, current events, and the weather are among the topics of conversations between the subscribers and volunteer callers.

“Strong bonds of friendship are often formed between the volunteers and the Tele-Care subscribers”, said Kari Behling, manager of Fort HealthCare Volunteer Services. “In my twenty years of experience with the Tele-Care program, several subscribers received emergency medical help because they had the service. If we don’t reach the subscriber we send help, and over the years we have found people that had fallen, people that had strokes, people that were disorientated for one reason or another, and people found still in bed that couldn’t get up because of weakness or chest pain,” she added. But more importantly, the goals of the program are to safeguard the welfare of subscribers and provide peace of mind for their families.

On those occasions when a telephone is not answered as expected, Tele-Care volunteers call an alternative phone number provided during the enrollment process. This is typically a family member, but can also be a trusted neighbor. These individuals will be asked to come to the home if an emergency situation is suspected. Enrollment information also includes instructions on how to enter a home in the event of an emergency. The police may be asked to make entry if necessary.

Persons interested in subscribing for the free service should review the following frequently asked questions and submit the application. Service begins almost immediately upon receipt of the application by Volunteer Services. Please call 920-568-5276 for more information. The Volunteer office is always seeking individuals to help extend this valuable service to others. If you are interested in greeting others with a cheery “Good morning, this is Tele-Care calling,”please call us!

Application materials