Health365 eNews
September 2014 • Volume 4, Issue 8

Having Healthy Babies: Experts Recommend Full Term Pregnancy

Every week of a pregnancy is crucial to a newborn’s health. Nationally, a trend has been noted that more and more births are being scheduled a little early for non-medical reasons. Experts are learning that this can cause problems for mom and baby.


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Every week of a pregnancy is crucial to a newborn’s health. Nationally, a trend has been noted that more and more births are being scheduled a little early for non-medical reasons. Experts are learning that this can cause problems for mom and baby. If possible, it’s best to stay pregnant for at least 39 weeks. If there are problems with your pregnancy or your baby’s health, you might not have a choice about when to have your baby, and you may need to have your baby earlier. But if you have a choice and you’re planning to schedule your baby’s birth, wait until at least 39 weeks.

With each decreasing week of gestation below 39 to 40 weeks, there is an increased risk of complications like respiratory distress, jaundice, infection, low blood sugar, extra days in the hospital (including time in the neonatal intensive care unit), and in some cases, even death of a newborn.

Although tests may show that the baby’s lungs are well developed at around 37 weeks, research has demonstrated that the risk of newborn complications is still significantly higher than if delivery occurs two to three weeks later than that. Many early deliveries contribute to an unacceptable number of premature births and avoidable, costly complications.

Satwant Dhillon, MD, an obstetrician and gynecologist with Fort HealthCare Center for Women’s Health states, “Studies have shown that newborns do much better if they are allowed to develop through at least 39 weeks gestation. Babies are just more mature closer to term than earlier. Their swallowing reflex is much stronger, and that is a necessary function for successful breastfeeding. Also, babies are more content, bilirubin levels are good, they can maintain their body temperature better, and they do not seem to experience respiratory difficulty when breathing regular room air compared to babies that are delivered too early.”

Although many women think that weight gain is all that happens to babies during the last few weeks of pregnancy, vital organs like the brain, lungs and liver are still developing. Babies aren’t fully developed until at least 39 weeks. For example, a baby’s brain at 35 weeks gestation weighs only two-thirds of what it will weigh at 39 to 40 weeks. There are also fewer vision and hearing problems among babies born at full term.

This is not to suggest that women should panic if labor begins earlier on its own. The recommendation applies not just to women whose labor is induced, but also to those having a scheduled Caesarean delivery. Too often, women are mistaken about when they got pregnant, which can throw off the calculation of their due date. Even when a “dating” ultrasound is done during the first trimester of pregnancy, there can be as much as a two-week margin of error. Thus, a woman may think her pregnancy has lasted 39 weeks when it is only 37 weeks along. Or she may think she is 37 weeks pregnant when she is only 35 weeks; a delivery at that point would result in a premature birth.

Why at least 39 weeks is best for your baby:

  • Babies born too early may have more health problems at birth and later in life than babies born full term.
  • Important organs like the brain, lungs, and liver get all the time they need to develop.
  • The child is less likely to have vision and hearing problems after birth.
  • Babies born too soon often are too small. Babies born at a healthy weight have an easier time staying warm than babies born too small.
  • The baby can suck and swallow and stay awake long enough to eat after he or she is born. Babies born early sometimes can’t do these things.

To help raise awareness about this important aspect of a healthy pregnancy, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services launched a multi-faceted perinatal health campaign in 2011 called “Strong Start.” This awareness campaign is designed to let women and health care providers know that if a pregnancy is healthy, it is best to wait for labor to begin on its own, rather than scheduling an induction of labor or a Cesarean section.

Dhillon continues, “We regularly conduct our own internal audits of patient care. Our practice really changed years ago to establishing a firm tradition of only delivering babies as close to full term as possible. This decision was based on the results of our own observations and research at Fort Memorial Hospital. We instituted our practice of doing things this way before the rest of the country did, even years before the national recommendation was established.”

The work of the pediatricians, obstetricians/gynecologists, and obstetrics nurses and staff at Fort Memorial Hospital in Fort Atkinson is also prominently featured among the Wisconsin Association of Perinatal Care, to share best practices and research findings with other hospitals in Wisconsin.

Dhillon adds, “We not only stay up-to-date on the latest advances in technology and patient care here, but we also continually work to identify ways to improve the health of our patients. We’re continuously conducting quality assurance measures like this ourselves, because it results in the best care that we can give our patients, and that is the most important thing to all of us.”

Proper prenatal care and good health of the mother before and during pregnancy are important factors in having a healthy baby. Dr. Dhillon is one of the expert OB/GYNs on a team of women’s health specialists that includes Julie Mokhtar, DO, Christine Chuppa, MD, Nancy Aguirre, MD and Joyce Dedrick, NP with Fort HealthCare Center for Women’s Health. To learn more, visit FortHealthCare.com/Women.

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Riding Out a Heat Wave

Disrespect the powerful summer sun and it could get dangerously hot. But with the right safeguards, you can keep heat-related problems from ruining your summer fun.


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Disrespect the powerful summer sun and it could get dangerously hot. But with the right safeguards, you can keep heat-related problems from ruining your summer fun.

Sweating it

Hot weather brings trouble when your body can no longer cool itself with perspiration. Usually, the culprit is simply not knowing when to quit an activity. Overexertion drains the body of fluids and electrolytes—minerals that help keep our cells working properly.

The result can be:

  • heat cramps in the abdomen, back or legs that disappear after cooling down and drinking plenty of fluids.
  • heat exhaustion, a condition marked by rapid heartbeat; faintness; nausea; and clammy, ashen skin. To treat, get to a shady or air-conditioned place, lie down, elevate feet, loosen clothing and sip cold water or juice.
  • heat stroke, a medical emergency. Symptoms include soaring body temperature; hot, red skin; shallow breathing; delirium; and fainting. Call 911 and get the person into an air-conditioned room and a cool tub or shower, or cover him or her with water-soaked towels.

(Note: Certain medicines for Parkinson’s disease, some tranquilizers and conditions like obesity or poor circulation can make you overheat more easily. Ask your doctor for special heat-safety advice.)

To keep cool, take safety measures such as:

  • Staying informed. Knowing your weather forecast can give you a vital head’s-up if you’ve got outdoor plans.
  • Drinking plenty of water, sports drinks or fruit juices—two to four cups an hour. Avoid caffeine and alcohol, which act as diuretics and rid the body of fluids.
  • Chilling out. Stay in an air-conditioned place, and don’t cook, do laundry or take hot baths or showers. Dress in light, loose clothes and avoid heavy, spicy meals.

Looking for a place to cool off? The lobby of Fort Memorial Hospital is open until 8 pm. Water is available and we have an indoor walking path so you can stay active and be safe. Please let your neighbors and family members know – especially the elderly.

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Back to school: The ABCs of calming first-day jitters

As summer begins to wind down and your kids are getting ready to go back to school, your to-do list will likely be filled with items such as buying new school clothes, stocking backpacks with supplies and arranging car pools.


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As summer begins to wind down and your kids are getting ready to go back to school, your to-do list will likely be filled with items such as buying new school clothes, stocking backpacks with supplies and arranging car pools.

At the same time, you should also be preparing your children to cope with the changes that will take place in their lives—whether they’re starting a new school or returning from summer vacation.

A reassuring approach

Some children become anxious when faced with the prospect of going back to school. Kids may worry about making friends. Sometimes they’re scared of the class bully or nervous about having a “mean” teacher. Or they may be worried about failing certain subjects. Others are self-conscious about their weight or how they look and are concerned they’ll be teased by other kids. And some children may feel the stress of a recent divorce or death in the family and be uneasy about leaving home.

Encourage your children to discuss what they like and dislike about school or why they don’t want to leave home. If you find out what’s bothering them, you can help ease anxiety and even get them excited about the prospect of going back to school.

Try these tips to help make the transition go smoothly:

  • A few weeks before school starts, set a normal routine; eat dinner at the same time every night and have your children go to bed and wake up earlier.
  • Let your kids take an active role in choosing their school clothes and supplies so they have a say in how well outfitted they are for the semester.
  • If your children are uncomfortable about meeting new friends or teachers, try role playing to help them feel prepared for these social encounters.
  • Visit the school with your children to meet new teachers. Peek at your kids’ classrooms. Point out the cafeteria, gym, library, art room, nurse’s office and so on if they’re unfamiliar with the school’s layout.
  • If your children will be attending a new school this year, ask school administrators whether they have orientation events such as ice cream socials or storytelling. Older kids can meet new school friends through summer recreation programs.
  • Tell your children how much you value education and that you plan to help them with their homework. Let them know you will volunteer at school and are looking forward to attending their school games and activities.

A smooth road ahead

Expect the first week to be a bit bumpy as children meet new teachers and learn new school routines and rules. Remind your children that everyone has first-day jitters—but chances are they’ll be gone by snack time.

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August is National Breastfeeding Month

When you are having a baby, you are faced with many questions which can seem overwhelming.  One of the most important is, how you are going to feed your baby? All governing health agencies recommend breastfeeding as the best form of nutrition for your baby, and so does Fort HealthCare. Of course, the transition to breastfeeding is not always easy, so we will help you in every way to make this a positive and successful experience.


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When you are having a baby, you are faced with many questions which can seem overwhelming.  One of the most important is, how you are going to feed your baby? All governing health agencies recommend breastfeeding as the best form of nutrition for your baby, and so does Fort HealthCare. Of course, the transition to breastfeeding is not always easy, so we will help you in every way to make this a positive and successful experience.

Here are 5 things to remember:

  1. You will provide only one teaspoon of milk per feeding for the first 2-3 days of your infant’s life. All infants have enough fluid to last for 2-3 days but it is important to remember that frequent early feedings will help your milk come in sooner and more abundantly. We recommend feeding per infant cues, but at least 8 times daily.
  2. Infants are hardwired to breastfeed. We can help this process by giving them early and unlimited access to the breast. We initiate this with the use of skin-skin as soon as the infant is born. This wakens the infant’s reflexes and we see infants breastfeeding more often and longer.
  3. Your infant should stay with you. Your baby knows you and wants to be with you. He will know you by smell and sound. By staying close to you he will be happier and you will learn to read his cues. Babies breastfeed better when Mom recognizes their feeding cues and puts to breast.
  4. Your baby should not be given a bottle or pacifier without talking to a lactation consultant. They may interfere with your baby’s ability to latch.
  5. Breastfeeding should not hurt. If you are having pain past the initial latch, call for help. Remember this is new for you and your baby. Don’t expect perfection.

Breastfeeding gives your new baby the very best start. It supplies food, comfort, and love. Experts agree: Breastfeeding is the healthiest choice for babies during the first year of life and beyond. It’s healthy for Mom, too. Breastfeeding may be challenging at first. But you and your baby can succeed together.

If you are having difficulty breastfeeding, call (920-568-5300) one of our five certified Lactation Consultants to provide counseling. Often, simple adjustments can make a world of difference. Visit FortHealthCare.com/Baby to learn more about how we’re helping you have a healthier baby.

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11 real-world ways to find exercise time

The fact that exercise is good for your health is no secret. But in recent years, a growing body of research shows that your level of physical activity is directly linked to your risk for cancer, especially colon, breast, endometrial, prostate and lung cancers. Exercise helps ward off cancer by keeping weight in check, aiding digestion and altering hormone levels in ways that discourage cancer from developing in your cells.


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The fact that exercise is good for your health is no secret. But in recent years, a growing body of research shows that your level of physical activity is directly linked to your risk for cancer, especially colon, breast, endometrial, prostate and lung cancers. Exercise helps ward off cancer by keeping weight in check, aiding digestion and altering hormone levels in ways that discourage cancer from developing in your cells.

Experts say to aim for an hour of moderate to vigorous activity a day. That may be well and good, but finding that extra hour is a challenge for many busy people. Remember, every little bit helps. Try some of these tips to squeeze exercise into your life without having to invent the 25-hour day:

  1. See the sunrise. Set your alarm for 30 minutes earlier than usual and use the time to ride the stationary bike, take a walk, jog or work out to an exercise DVD.
  2. Schedule it. Mark your workout on your calendar as you would any appointment such as business meetings or dental cleanings. Sign up for a class or have a standing date with a workout buddy.
  3. Start a lunch club. Recruit co-workers to join you for lunchtime treks.
  4. Use your commute. Can you walk or bike to work? Why not park one mile away or get off the bus several stops earlier?
  5. Make family time active. Start a tradition of an after-dinner walk or a Saturday afternoon hike or bike ride.
  6. Walk and talk. Instead of meeting for coffee, drinks or lunch, ask friends you see regularly to take a walk with you––a healthier way to catch up.
  7. Take the less convenient path. You’ve heard these before, but do you do them? Take the stairs instead of the elevator (or jog up the escalator); in parking lots, park in the spot farthest from the door.
  8. Use commercial breaks. When you watch television, get in the habit of standing up during every commercial and doing some exercise––jog in place, do a few jumping jacks, calisthenics or stretching exercises.
  9. Turn chores into calorie-burners. Turn on some music and pick up the pace as you do housecleaning, yard work or other chores.
  10. Play with kids. Whether they’re your own or your neighbors’, it’s hard to find a kid who doesn’t love a good game of tag. Walk laps around the field while watching the grandkids’ soccer games.
  11. Pace with a pedometer. This inexpensive gadget tracks the number of steps you take while wearing it. Write down your total steps at bedtime and challenge yourself to increase your number each day.

 

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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

Treating a Sunburn for a Pain Free Summer

News

Fort HealthCare Jefferson Clinic Nears Completion

August 7th marks the anticipated opening of the new Fort HealthCare Jefferson Clinic at 840 West Racine Street. This brand new building replaces the former clinic building that served patients for more than 39 years at that location.


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Fort HealthCare Kids Konnection Daycare, Preschool and 4K Garden

Nursing Scholarships Available Through Fort HealthCare Partners

Stepping On Program Offered for Seniors

Fort HealthCare is once again offering Stepping On, a fall prevention program for seniors. Those 65 and older, who have had a fall, are fearful of falling or are living in their own home or apartment are encouraged to attend the workshop led by Lee Clay, RN and Faith Nurse coordinator. Participants must be able to ambulate independently or with minimal assistance, such as a cane. No walkers, please.


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New Fitness Classes Start in August

Fort HealthCare is committed to improving the health and well-being of our community. We encourage everyone to explore opportunities for self-enhancement. These new fitness classes beginning in August and other offerings can help.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
January 1 Having Healthy Babies
January 1 Free Health Screening at Fort HealthCare Internal Medicine & Pediatrics
January 1 AHA BLS Recognition Course
January 1 Carbone’s Race for Research
January 1 Tri for the Rock Bike Ride
January 1 AHA BLS Renewal Course
January 1 Boot Camp
January 1 Boot Camp Express
January 1 Cardio Kickboxing
January 1 Cardio Kickboxing Express
January 1 Yoga
January 1 Zumba
January 1 AHA Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
January 1 No Nonsense, Low Impact
January 1 Step Aerobics
January 1 Yoga Express
January 1 Zumba
January 1 Boot Camp
January 1 Cardio Kickboxing
January 1 Glutes & Abs
January 1 No Nonsense, Low Impact
January 1 Step Aerobics Express
January 1 Zumba
January 1 Boot Camp Express
January 1 Cardio Kickboxing Express
January 1 AHA Heartsaver CPR/AED
January 1 AHA BLS Renewal Course
January 1 On My Own at Home
January 1 AHA BLS Renewal Course
January 1 Glutes & Abs
January 1 Red Cross Babysitting
January 1 Fort HealthCare Family Health Fair
January 1 Free Health Screening at Fort Memorial Hospital
Recipes

Honey Soy Broiled Salmon

Submitted by Lisa Ashwill, Clinical Dietitian



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Submitted by Lisa Ashwill, Clinical Dietitian

1 scallion, minced
2 T reduced-sodium soy sauce
1 T rice vinegar
1 T honey
1 tsp. minced fresh ginger
1 pound center-cut salmon fillet, skinned and cut into 4 portions
1 tsp. toasted sesame seeds

Whisk scallion, soy sauce, vinegar, honey and ginger in a medium bowl until the honey is dissolved. Place salmon in a sealable plastic bag, add 3 tablespoons of the sauce and refrigerate; let marinate for 15 minutes. Reserve the remaining sauce.

Preheat broiler. Line a small baking pan with foil and coat with cooking spray. Transfer the salmon to the pan, skinned-side down. (Discard the marinade.) Broil the salmon 4 to 6 inches from the heat source until cooked through, 6 to 10 minutes. Drizzle with the reserved sauce and garnish with sesame seeds.

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