Health365 eNews
July 2015 • Volume 8, Issue 7

Three Fort HealthCare Employees Voted Best of the Area in Healthcare

Fort HealthCare congratulates Dr. Donald Williams, RN Elizabeth Bourke and Paramedic Larry Fritz, voted the Best Doctor, Best Nurse and Best EMT in the area. Dr. Williams has been caring for members of our community at Fort Medical Group’s Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Clinic for 35 years, since 1980. Dr. Williams has received this honor 7 of 9 years since the poll began.


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Fort HealthCare congratulates Dr. Donald Williams, RN Elizabeth Bourke and Paramedic Larry Fritz, voted the Best Doctor, Best Nurse and Best EMT in the area. Dr. Williams has been caring for members of our community at Fort Medical Group’s Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Clinic for 35 years, since 1980. Dr. Williams has received this honor 7 of 9 years since the poll began. Nurse Bourke has been caring for our newest arrivals as an obstetrics nurse at the Fort Memorial Hospital Birthing Center for over 9 years, since 2005. Paramedic Fritz has been involved in Emergency Medical Services for 12 years and part of Fort Memorial Hospital’s Paramedic Intercept program for the past 5 years, responding to emergency calls throughout the Jefferson County area.

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Donald Williams, MD Fort Medical Group Internal Medicine & Pediatrics

Elizabeth Bourke, RN Fort Memorial Hospital Birthing Center

Lary Fritz - 2015 010-Pro-HR

Larry W. Fritz, Paramedic, Fort Memorial Hospital Paramedic Intercept

The readers’ vote of confidence in our caring professionals reflects Fort HealthCare’s pride in the great work Dr. Williams, Elizabeth, Larry and all their colleagues do every day, close to home.

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Talking to Your Health Care Provider

Telling your health care provider (HCP) about yourself will help improve your care. And ask questions when you don’t understand something, or just want to know more. Don’t be afraid to speak up! Good communication with your HCP helps you get the most out of your health care.


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Telling your health care provider (HCP) about yourself will help improve your care. And ask questions when you don’t understand something, or just want to know more. Don’t be afraid to speak up! Good communication with your HCP helps you get the most out of your health care.

Talk About Your Lifestyle

All sorts of things can affect your health. So your HCP needs to know about your daily life.

Tell Your HCP

  • Where you work and what you do
  • Whether you live alone or with others
  • About your eating and sleeping habits
  • Whether you get regular exercise
  • If you drink alcohol or smoke
  • If you are under a lot of stress
  • If you are dealing with a major life change such as marriage, divorce, or retirement
  • Your health and wellness goals

Share Your Symptoms

Symptoms are a change from what’s normal. They suggest illness or injury. If you notice a change in the way your body looks, works, or feels, tell your HCP.

Tell Your HCP

  • The type of symptom, such as pain, fever, nausea, or weakness
  • When your symptoms started
  • How often you have symptoms
  • Whether your symptoms wake you up at night
  • Whether you have symptoms at a certain time of day or while you are doing specific things
  • How bad your symptoms are
  • Whether your symptoms interfere with your daily activities and, if so, how
  • Whether other family members or people you spend time with have similar symptoms
  • Whether your symptoms are getting better or worse
  • Whether you have had these symptoms before
  • Whether you have other symptoms

Discuss Your Diagnosis

A diagnosis identifies the cause of an illness or the reason for symptoms. Be sure you understand your diagnosis. This will make it easier for you and your HCP to reach decisions about your treatment and care.

Ask Your HCP

  • The name of the condition
  • The cause of the condition
  • How long the condition will last
  • Whether there will be any long-term effects
  • What you can do to prevent the condition in the future
  • How you can learn more about the condition

Ask About Medical Tests

Medical tests include things such as blood tests and X-rays. If you have a medical problem, tests can give your doctor more information. Tests can also uncover hidden health problems.

Ask Your HCP

  • Why you need the test
  • What the test results will show
  • If there are any risks
  • How accurate the test results will be
  • How much the test will cost and if there is a less expensive option
  • How the test is done and how long it will take
  • What you need to do to get ready for the test
  • How you will feel after the test
  • If you will be able to drive yourself home

Think Over Your Treatment Options

Many medical conditions can be treated. Your HCP may recommend a certain treatment. But it’s a decision you need to make together.

Ask Your HCP

  • About all your treatment options, including diet, exercise, medication, and surgery
  • How much treatment will cost
  • How soon you should start treatment
  • How long treatment will last
  • Whether there are risks
  • What will happen if the condition is not treated

Ask About Prevention

The goal of prevention is to keep from developing diseases or conditions. It’s easier to prevent illness than it is to cure it. Talk to your HCP about what you can do to keep yourself healthy.

Ask Your HCP

  • How often you should come in for checkups
  • Whether you should get shots to prevent disease
  • How often you should get screening tests
  • Whether you should make any lifestyle changes
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Children with Asthma, Food Allergies Need a School Emergency Plan

Children with asthma or a food allergy may find school a challenge. A sudden asthma attack or allergic reaction can quickly turn into an emergency. Unfortunately, not all students with these conditions have a care plan in place to help deal with such a situation.


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Children with asthma or a food allergy may find school a challenge. A sudden asthma attack or allergic reaction can quickly turn into an emergency. Unfortunately, not all students with these conditions have a care plan in place to help deal with such a situation.

In an emergency

The number of children with asthma and food allergies is growing. In fact, more than 10% of children now suffer from asthma. Around 8% have a food allergy—most often to nuts. These conditions can usually be managed. But an emergency can happen anytime, even during the school day.

Experts recommend that children with a chronic condition like asthma or a food allergy have a school emergency care plan. But a recent study suggests that too few children do. Researchers looked at the use of these plans in the Chicago Public School System. It’s the third largest public school district in the U.S. There, only a quarter of children with asthma and only half of those with a food allergy had such a plan on file.

An emergency care plan can help teachers and school employees properly care for a child during a health crisis. It’s also sometimes called a 504 Plan. This document may explain a child’s condition. It may provide step-by-step care instructions. It may also list current medicine, asthma triggers, or special dietary needs. It often contains the name and phone number of the child’s doctor.

A vital tool

An emergency care plan is a vital tool in your child’s care. School employees don’t always know how to care for a child who is suffering from an asthma attack or allergic reaction. They may not recognize the symptoms or know how to give needed medicine. In these cases, an emergency care plan can make a difference. It can save your child from a serious health scare.

If your child has asthma or a food allergy, work with his or her doctor to create a school emergency care plan. The following steps can also help protect your child during a health-related emergency:

  • Tell your child’s teachers and other school employees about your child’s condition. Be sure they know how to identify symptoms that the condition is getting worse.
  • Make sure your child has enough medicine on hand during the school day. See if the school can store extra asthma inhalers or epinephrine injections in case they are needed.
  • Give written consent. Your child’s school may require you to sign a form that allows staff members to contact your child’s doctor during an emergency. You may also need to fill out a similar form for your child’s doctor to talk to school staff.
  • Review your child’s emergency care plan every year. Update it as needed. Immediately notify the school if contact information for you or your child’s doctor changes.

An asthma action plan is another tool that can help your child better manage asthma. Find out more here.

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Pre-Participation Physical Exams

A pre-participation exam may be required for any child who wants to take part in a school athletic activity. This may also be needed for an organized sports activity outside of school.


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A pre-participation exam may be required for any child who wants to take part in a school athletic activity. This may also be needed for an organized sports activity outside of school.

WHY IS A PRE-PARTICIPATION EXAM IMPORTANT?

A pre-participation exam for your child is used to:

  • Find any medical or physical problems that could make participation risky.
  • Find any medical or physical problems that could be fixed to make participation a more beneficial experience.
  • Help maintain health and safety.
  • Make sure your child is fit enough to participate in the activity.
  • Teach your child about the activity.
  • Meet all the legal and insurance requirements for participation in the activity.

WHEN IS PRE-PARTICIPATION EXAM NEEDED?

Pre-participation exams are usually necessary before starting an activity. They may be required again if treatment is needed before clearance is given. If your child is injured while playing the sport, he or she may need to have another exam for permission to return to play. How often your child needs to have an exam depends on the activity and the local laws governing the activity. In many cases, annual exams are required.

WHAT’S INVOLVED?

Pre-participation exams usually require a medical history and physical exam by a qualified medical professional like your pediatrician. In many cases, a form will need to be filled out. Sometimes, your family health care provider will be able to do the exam and fill out the form. Other times, the exam may have to be done at a particular clinic.

Girls usually receive the same type of pre-participation exam as boys. They may be asked if they have any problems related to menstrual periods. They may also be asked about their feelings concerning their weight and appearance. This is to check for an eating disorder. Girls may also be advised about an increased risk for stress fractures and knee injuries.

A pre-participation exam is a good way to make sure your child can safely enjoy an organized physical activity. It is also a chance to learn about the activity and the possible risks of participation

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As Prescribed
Looking for timely and accurate health and wellness information from the Fort HealthCare clinicians you know and love? Visit FortHealthCare.com/Blog for updates on women's health, nutrition, skin care, foot pain and many other health topics.

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If you’re like me, then you are possibly missing a few ZZZ’s nightly and have the same thought every morning– “5 more minutes, please!”

I’ve struggled with sleep issues since my sophomore year of college. I started not being able to sleep one night and didn’t think much about it. The same thing happened a few days later, and I chalked it up to stress over exams, projects, and making sure my social schedule was being filled. As the weeks went on and my sleeplessness was becoming a habit, the days without sleep were more frequent than the nights with sleep. Cue: irritability, unhealthy eating, fogginess, not exercising, syncopal episodes and just a general “always feeling like crap” feeling.


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Upcoming Events
Fort HealthCare is proud to sponsor a number of community events. All year long, you can find a number of health and fitness related events and classes for the whole family. Check out Health365Events.com to find more activities throughout the community.
August 12 Camp 911
August 26 Basic Life Support Course
September 4 Basic Life Support Renewal
August 15 AHA Heartsaver Family & Friends CPR
August 12 AHA Heartsaver First Aid/CPR/AED
August 17 Basic EKG Class
August 24 Critical Care Classes
August 19 Pediatric Emergency Assessment Recognition and Stabilization (PEARS)
Recipes

Recipe: Blueberry Banana Smoothie

A summertime or anytime refreshing smoothie which is gluten-free and gout-friendly. Try this tasty and simple recipe to add fruits and calcium to your daily diet.



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A summertime or anytime refreshing smoothie which is gluten-free and gout-friendly. Try this tasty and simple recipe to add fruits and calcium to your daily diet.

Ingredients

1 frozen ripe banana
1/2 cup frozen blueberries
1 cup skim milk

Directions

Bananas that are getting past ripe work perfectly in smoothies. Peel them, wrap them in plastic, and freeze them. Later, cut the banana into pieces. Put ingredients into blender and puree till smooth. Pour into two glasses.

Each serving contains about 122 calories, 5 g protein, 0 g fat, 24 g carbohydrates, 3 g fiber, and 63 mg sodium.

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Phone: 920.568.5000 | www.forthealthcare.com